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The only problem with this collection is that there's not more.

Wendy Cope's gleeful, impish smile on the cover of the jacket pretty much tells the reader what's going on inside the pages of these selected poems.

Damn, she's good!

The title poem "Two Cures for Love" is only two lines long. Just two lines and yet it makes up the book's title? Can you believe it? But such pithiness and wit is in the poem, it almost hurts to understand how brilliant it is. There are two cures for love and one of them is not to write nor see the person ever again. But what's the second cure? You must read the poem -- or the second line in the poem. Is it really worth the price of the book? Oh, yes, yes! And cheaper than the price of any psychotherapist!

Almost all the poems selected are short on the page; just three are longer than a page, and there's some sonnets in here as well. You'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll wonder why just these sounds that she's composed and not others that might be mentioned are the very ones to make you grin and even squeal with delight -- without revealing a single clue as to how she pulled any of them off.

I loved her poem "Being Boring," "Two Cures for Love" and the one about being in love with A.E. Housman even though he's been dead since 1936 called "Another Unfortunate Choice."

Wendy Cope's poems are so funny, touching and satiric, dour Anita Brookner would be forced to guffaw impuslively if she were given the opportunity to read them. I love this refreshing collection of irreverent, sardonic poems, and they're wonderful to reread, too. I've never met her, but she's been my favorite poet for the last twenty years.
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on 30 March 2009
This is a fantastic selection of Wendy's poems - some from previous anthologies and some previously unpublished ones too (both old and new). A must have for anyone who hasn't read her fabulous poetry before and a great addition for fans with insights from Wendy about each poem in a reference at the rear.
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on 2 July 2013
she has a gentle 'way with words' dealing with routine daily life observations... just purchased her book 'Making Cocoa for Kinglsey Amis'. In which the first poem is a reaction prompted by an employment advert for engineering vacancies(the ad comically suggests the popularity of youngsters choosing engineering for a career as opposed to dreaming of their becoming talented celebrity poets)... Ms Cope's sarcasm in her poetry response is 'harmless' and refreshing... chatty and just the kind of thing one would say in passing to another over coffee... well 'under'stated... like an 'easy conversation'. I like a variety of writings from Beckett to stories for children - Ms Cope's is the genre of poetry you pick up at the end of the day for a peaceful 'smile' at life. Its an added bonus to hear the author reading from their works. The Set here comprises of a mini book-all the poems on the audio cassette in writing- and one audio cassette.. the poet is well worth listening to as she introduces each poem(describes the 'form' it is written in) and is clear in her reading ability-not full of 'added music or special effects' but plain and simple.

poems included:

Making Coca for Kinglsey Amis
A Nursery Rhyme
Waste Land Limericks
A Policeman's Lot
Reading Scheme
Rondeau Redouble
From June to December
III Summer Villanelle/V Some People/VI Going too Far
My Lover
At 3 a.m.
Tich Miller
Sisters
from Strugnells Sonnets The Expense of spirits/Good and the Jolly Bored Bog-Mouse
The Lavatory Attendant
Strugnells Haiku
From Twiddling your Thumbs Telling/Thomas Thumb/Kissing
From Serious Concerns Bloody Men/Flowers/the Orange/After the Lunch/Favourite
Another Unfortunate Choice
Loss
Two Cures for Love
Defining the Problem
The Aerial
Some More Light Verse
Exchange of Letters
The Uncertainty of the Poet
Kindness to Animals
A Green Song
A Christmas Poem
Valentine
Nine-line Triolet
In the Rhine Valley
Faint Praise
Men and Their Boring Arguments
Strugnells Christian Song III
Legacy/Names/Leaving
Uncollected
Song/An ending/Wiggle that Toe/Huff/An attempt at Unrhymed Verse
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on 1 July 2011
I've been a big fan of Wendy Cope for about 8 years, when I came across her work in my first year at university. Her critics state that she is a lightweight, that she cannot be considered a 'serious' poet. I beg to differ. She is naturally lighthearted - something you cannot deny as you read her work. But that does not mean that her work does not have depth.

There are layers upon layers in the short, pithy, sentences. Cope is able to use simple language to convey a wealth of emotion, and engages the discerning reader from the very first word. It is this incredible skill which makes her so popular; people of all walks of life and educational backgrounds are touched by her poetry.

I only wish her work was a little more prolific!
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VINE VOICEon 22 June 2009
This is the first book of poems by Wendy Cope that I have read and I very much enjoyed it. There is one in particular that stands out for me personally - 'Names' - which will resonate with anyone that has had an aged relative in hospital.
There a poems that are witty and cleverly done like 'A Policeman's Lot' and poems of love when all is rose-tinted and new and others when it goes wrong and dies and some when it is just plain wrong in the first place.
I would definitely like to read more from Wendy Cope
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on 2 January 2012
I love Wendy Cope's work and already have some of her poems in my head; they come to mind all the time, in all kinds of different situations. They are funny and sad and truthful and ironic by turns, or sometimes all at once. This collection contains a really good cross section from different periods and includes many of my favourites. I gave it recently to a friend who professes not to like poetry and she really loved it too. It has something for (almost) everyone.
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on 20 August 2009
Wonderful insight to detail of emotions and extraordinary observations of everyday happenings.As fab as Dorothy Parker and Stevie Smith.
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on 3 March 2016
Thoroughly enjoyed this eclectic and wide ranging collection. Highly recommended for all-whether you're a bit intimidated by the potentially pretentious side of poetry or a poetry fan looking to discover one of our more accessible writers-this has something for everyone and every mood. Great for a book club too as its a short read with plenty to return to and discuss.
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on 7 June 2009
Wendy Cope never fails to inspire. This book is excellent for just dipping into or reading straight through. She makes me laugh, sometimes cry, but is spot on. "Defining the Problem" just says it all and is a poem that, to me, has been so helpful.
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on 29 March 2013
Great collection which explores our foibles as pursuers of love and what that means. Playful, funny, touching, and full of unexpected truths.
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