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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Auster is Magic
City of Glass is an incredible novel. Auster's prose is graceful, and elastic enough to express virtually any idea. It will carry you through the story even if you would rather not go. Auster employs as much subtltety as anyone could stand to impart the profound (and confusing) message of this novel. By the last page, I felt invigorated, perplexed, and grateful...
Published on 30 Jun 1999

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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars poor
This is a poor adaptation of a metaphysical novel. The confusing nature of the source material is part of the problem. Much of it is just illustrating the text, which is a weak way of telling a story, and at times the chosen images are just too clunkily literal. It does have some good artistic ideas, but the overall effect is wasted. It's annoying this was hailed as an...
Published on 26 Aug 2010 by Tom White


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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!, 1 Feb 2005
By 
E. J. MccArron "eamonn_mccarron2003" (Glasgow, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: City of Glass: Graphic Novel (Paperback)
This is a brilliant adaption of the original book. A really pleasant surprise as often adaptians can kill the original article, but not in this case. Strongly recommend that you have a look at this book.
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3 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Dressed Up Postmodern Metafiction, 11 Dec 2005
By 
A. Ross (Washington, DC) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: City of Glass: Graphic Novel (Paperback)
The first book of Auster's New York trilogy was originally published in 1985, and in 1994 was adapted into this graphic novel. I've never read the original (or any of the other parts of the trilogy), so I can't comment on Karasik and Mazzicchelli's adaptation. However, I can say that since I'm not particularly fond of existentialist or postmodernist literature (those two terms being the most common critical shorthand for Auster's story), this really didn't do anything for me at all. The story is basically an exercise in metafiction, and if you like that stuff, great -- I do not. It is dressed up (at least initially) in the mystery genre, but that's just window dressing. (There's a long legacy, especially in France, of cloaking novels and films of ideas in genre trappings (for example Alain Robbe-Grillet's two books The Erasers and The Voyeur, or the films of Jean-Pierre Melville.)
The story begins fairly straightforwardly: a reclusive writer of potboiler mysteries named Daniel Quinn lives in New York on his own since the death of his wife and son. A complete stranger calls him and thinks Quinn is a private detective named Paul Auster and begs him to to take his case. (The writer Paul Auster, and his family, shows up for one scene -- it's that kind of book.) Quinn meets with the strange man, who was raised in rather harrowing circumstances by his professor father, who was seeking to discover the true language of God. The father has been released from jail and Quinn is supposed to keep an eye on him and report. Everything starts to derail when he loses track of both the old man he's been following, and his clients. He spends several months watching the building and going crazy. Once he realizes they've disappeared, he finds his own life has disappeared as well. Obviously this is all somewhat about identity, but it's more about fun stuff like language, representation, and other tiresome postmodern subjects (as are the other two parts of the trilogy, which involve a man spying on someone, and yet another disappearance).
It has to be said that the artwork does an admirable job of treating the bizarro world Auster has thrust his characters into. The simple, heavy black and white inking is a perfect match to the material, especially when the representations become less literal and more symbolic. However, if your taste runs more toward things like plots and characters, this is probably not for you. Fans of Auster may enjoy this, but fans of the graphic novel form are probably going to be much less keen.
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0 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars What on earth was the point to this inane book?!!, 5 Aug 1998
By A Customer
The only mystery in this book is where the plot jaunted off to. It started off as a mystery, a pretty good one at that, and then all of a sudden it was about a man who had totally lost his grip on reality. Intelligent writer on one page, human with no reason on next. Who in their right mind would train themselves to live like a homeless person for months, disregarding his own responsibilities, and then being surprised to find his life is not as he left it. The first half of the book had nothing to do with the second half of the book. What message was the author trying to convey with the second half of the story? This was the worst book I have read in years.
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City of Glass: Graphic Novel
City of Glass: Graphic Novel by Paul Auster (Paperback - 3 Feb 2005)
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