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13
3.8 out of 5 stars
City of Glass: Graphic Novel
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 9 April 2011
I haven't read any Paul Auster novels; I've tried, but gave up, and to be honest this story didn't really convince me otherwise. But while the tale itself is only OK, the way in which it's told is fantastic. Paul Karasik and David Mazuchelli combine really well to create a story that's very well paced and, despite a lot of talking heads, never dull. A 9-panel grid is used throughout, but like Watchmen the grid becomes an essential part of the storytelling and frees rather than constrains.

As a story I can take this or leave it, but as a piece of comic art this is essential.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 30 June 1999
City of Glass is an incredible novel. Auster's prose is graceful, and elastic enough to express virtually any idea. It will carry you through the story even if you would rather not go. Auster employs as much subtltety as anyone could stand to impart the profound (and confusing) message of this novel. By the last page, I felt invigorated, perplexed, and grateful. Don't be put off by the ending, the message will be there if you only look for it. City of Glass is a rare book , worth absorbing, and one that will certainly be read and appreciated for many years to come.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 16 March 1999
When Peter Stillman met Quinn. Imagine you keep a Red Notebook as a person and start to use it as Quinn did... This is only one little thing that made me thinking after reading this book. It's so beautifully closed but it leaves so many place for yourself to think... brilliant!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 6 December 1998
This book makes you think, but it is so skillfully and beautifully written that it is without pretention. It asks questions about writing and literature and art and life, but it is above all a page-turning mystery set in New York City. I always wanted to know what would happen next, but the language was so beautiful that I was content no matter how much or how little of the actions were actually explained. I recommend this to all mystery-lovers, all New Yorkers, and anyone who loves to read. This book may turn you into a bit of an existentialist, but it will do so with a great sense of humor.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 12 July 2009
This is an excellent graphic novel adaptation of Paul Auster's City of Glass. It is well worth for any Auster enthusiast or for anyone who enjoy's graphic novels.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 26 August 2010
This is a poor adaptation of a metaphysical novel. The confusing nature of the source material is part of the problem. Much of it is just illustrating the text, which is a weak way of telling a story, and at times the chosen images are just too clunkily literal. It does have some good artistic ideas, but the overall effect is wasted. It's annoying this was hailed as an example of a comic as literature (is that just because it's an illustrated version of a novel?) when there are great 'true' comics out there.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 17 March 2013
Weird enough drawings to complete a complex story. The story is better if you hsve read some other book of Paul Auster.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 30 May 1999
Before you get too excited from reading the other reviews, I will offer some words of caution.
The ending is weak. It is that simple. (Ending defined as the last chapter or two.)
Auster offers beautiful prose and the book reads quickly. It is intriguing, but when I finished it was as though Auster had written himself into a corner. All his brilliant questions could not be solved.
A novel does not need to answer everything. Leaving the reader to think is good, but Auster at second glance seems to lead the reader on knowing he cannot fulfil the experience with a proper ending. Yet, in some ways that is his point.
The book is worth reading if you have never encountered Auster before or read any existentialistic novels because then the book will be unique. Yes, unlike anything you have ever read before.
I have read of all of Auster's novels - except Timuktu which is just out - and they all seem to have this problem except for Mr. Vertigo.
Go to Auster for fancy prose. He is great at it, but do not expect a fulfilling ending.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 1 June 1999
I am by far what you would call an acomplished reader. A good book to me is one I can finish, but I am taking a Contemporary Literature class over the summer and was forced to read "City of Glass" by Paul Auster. I must say, Auster has a unique way of not letting the reader understand what the heck is going on. For the first half of the book, I was under the assumption that this was a mystery/detective novel. By the 203 page, it had turned into a book of morals. Auster was addressing how screwed up the world is and how we all play a part in it. It turned into a book about a man that was so out of the norm, the character should not even be allowed to comment on what he thinks is right or wrong. The Daniel Quinn from the beginning of the book is a different person by the end, which can only make the reader wonder, what was Auster trying to convey to the reader? Or was this just something I, as a young student of literature, have missed...
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 24 January 1999
My first Paul Auster. I dont read much detective stories. So I really first caught on when Quin started to talk to Peter Stillman. From then on, I was really enchanted, but kept asking myself: "What is the connection between the story about Stillman and the delibarete confusion with the names". In the end I was still fascinated, although I still dont understand what Paul Auster want to tell me.
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