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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars8
3.5 out of 5 stars
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on 3 November 2002
I love this anthology! It does what it says on the tin; it's a collection of poems about happy things: moments, memories and moods mostly. Surprisingly, there's very few comic poems. Instead, it's a rather moving collection, mostly focussed on "kissing the joy as it flies", and there's almost a pleasant ache induced by sharing some of these moments.
The choice of poets is wide ranging and goes from Chaucer to Derek Walcott. Some of the entries are predictable and easily found elswhere (eg "sumer is icumen in" and "Jenny Kiss'd Me"), but it's always comforting to read these old favourites again. There was enough that was new to me in here to merit the purchase. Look out for "Red Boots On" by Kit Wright, "Faure's Second Piano Quartet" by James Schuyler and "Ice on the Highway" by Thomas Hardy, which I thought were delightful poems that are not found in every anthology.
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on 23 August 2011
These poems are all celebratory in one way or another, demolishing the notion that good poems are always written on themes of misery and mortality. The value of having them published together is in their variousness. Names that everyone knows (W. H. Auden, Robert Graves, Dylan Thomas, etc.) appear alongside names that are relatively unknown, or known only to poetry buffs. For fans of Wendy Cope, this small anthology offers a welcome new angle on Ms. Cope's enviably wide range of references. It's an interesting and unusual collection - though I'd actually like to read more new poems by Wendy Cope herself.
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on 29 July 2012
I am a poetry novice and wanted to read some poetry but didn't know where to start when I happened upon this title. It appealed so I bought the book and I have been converted. It's funny, heart warming, inspirational and just plain lovely.
From growing old, going bald, eating babies, rain, it has opened my eyes to the wealth of poetry there is out there. I have my favourites and will be purchasing more books by particular poets but this little book is one I dip into constantly. Read and enjoy.
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on 18 October 2001
Wendy Cope's own poems are are an endless source of comfort and laughter, so she is well qualified to choose happy poems. But her '101 Happy Poems' make up an uneven and somewhat unimaginative selection. Though her own work is so fresh and modern, Cope brings in a surprising number of old stalwarts - My Mind to Me a Kingdom Is, Glory be to God for Dappled Things - although there are also lesser-known voices. The pleasures of eating, drinking, slipping on the ice, even of going bald are covered. Yet many of the poems are not strikingly happy. Cope's definition of 'happy' is blurred, and strays into 'contemplative' - for instance, Robert Frost's Mowing, Wordsworth's Daffodils or Keat's On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer. If you want to be re-acquainted with these, then buy this anthology. The cover, by the way, is awful. Surely Faber can do better than to ape the Harper Collins '101 poems' series which are much more daring and enjoyable.
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on 5 April 2013
Prompt delivery. Brought as a gift for my mother who loves to read poetry and knew she liked some of Wendy Cope's poetry and would maybe enjoy reading this collection put together by her. I was right. she loves it even though there are a few poems in the collection that she either has or knows.
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on 17 February 2015
The fruit of a lifetime's reading, this is not as joyful as one might expect - the first pleasure for me (reading alphabetically) was Chaucer! Maybe 101 angry poems would be more nourishing for the soul, XJ Kennedy's Tygers of Wrath or our very own Kenneth Baker's I Have No Gun But I Can Spit, not half bad for a Tory grandee (now, preposterously, Baron Baker of Dorking)
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on 26 January 2015
I ordered this because of the picture on the front (for a particular reason) but when it arrived the front was different to that advertised. Had to return. Very disappointing and feel goods should be as advertised.
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on 7 June 2009
A lovely collection, you can return to it day after day and carry on enjoying them ater multiple readings.
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