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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The readers ignorence takes away from this book
This book is about issues which are very alien to most western readers. Islam is seen by the west to be linked to terrorism and violence, but this book deals with the effect of islamic fundementalism in a different way. I read this book when i was in iran and the choices which the main protagonist must face between the 'free' western hedonistic attitude as represented by...
Published on 31 Mar 2001 by lovelypoppy@hotmail.com

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Depressing....
I bought this book as "The Buddha of Suburbia" (also by Kureishi) which I had intended to buy, was not in stock.

The cover blurb seemed good, promising an insight into modern issues of multiculturalism in Britain.

Sadly, the cover really is the best bit. The main characters are one-dimensional, and you can easily tell what each of them is going to...
Published on 30 Mar 2010 by big bad Bob


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Depressing...., 30 Mar 2010
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This review is from: The Black Album (Paperback)
I bought this book as "The Buddha of Suburbia" (also by Kureishi) which I had intended to buy, was not in stock.

The cover blurb seemed good, promising an insight into modern issues of multiculturalism in Britain.

Sadly, the cover really is the best bit. The main characters are one-dimensional, and you can easily tell what each of them is going to do before you read it. The plot which these characters inhabit lurches about violently, leaving the reader feeling disconnected from the story. The main protagonist (and indeed, most characters in the book) are pretty unpleasant, and it is hard to feel empathy with them, or the situations they get themselves into. The depiction of London is of a trashy, drug-riddled waste ground devoid of dignity or hope (I know London is no utopia, but really it isn't THIS bad)

The main sticking point though, is that the multicultural issues are not addressed, just talked around or used to ignite another (predictable) confrontation. I really did want to like this book, and to get some newer understanding of a complex issue from it, however, it isn't likeable or complex in itself.

On the plus side, there are vivid little scenes that mad me laugh out loud, so 2 stars overall, but, I would not recommend it.

I noticed that "Buddha of Suburbia" is now back in stock - I will give this a go and hopefully see Kureishi in a more favourable light
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Some strong elements in the book which are unsustained., 28 Dec 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Black Album (Paperback)
The life experiences of young second generation British Asians are rather familiar Kureishi territory and sad to say this book panders to stereotype rather too much, especially in the depiction of the extremist Muslim characters which are crude and one-dimensional. The dialogue too is sometimes clumsy and unbelievable, and the novel's discussion of literature borders on the pretentious. On the positive side, however, the various clashes evident in Shahid's personality are drawn out for all they are worth and it is clear the author has real insight into the problem of confused cultural identity, which allows for an interesting examination of the psychology of Shahid's tentative rejection of Western values.
NK
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The readers ignorence takes away from this book, 31 Mar 2001
This review is from: The Black Album (Paperback)
This book is about issues which are very alien to most western readers. Islam is seen by the west to be linked to terrorism and violence, but this book deals with the effect of islamic fundementalism in a different way. I read this book when i was in iran and the choices which the main protagonist must face between the 'free' western hedonistic attitude as represented by dedee, and the opposing islamic ideals seem very real. The fall of the Berlin Wall has nothing to do with this idea and personal struggle, the islamic reveloution in iran, which Kureshi mentions in the book is one of the 'current issues' which is most important in the influence of the idealistic chracters. This is a story about being muslim, and more importantly being a muslim who has grown up with fundimentally western attitudes and ideas. The style may seem confused at times, but is only seems to be reflecting the confusion felt by almost every one of it's charaters, through the clash of an increasingly hedonistic west, verses the upheval and re-exploration of islam in the modern world.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An intelligent amusing book about cultural identity, 1 Jan 2005
By 
R. Fulton "rob56059" (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I loved this book and found it well written and pertinent to many of the issues of a multicultural society. It addresses the problems of growing up as a British Asian and the tension between traditional and liberal values. It is very relevant to these days of cultural antagonism and also very amusing and touching. I think everyone should read this book. The plot is not confusing and the story is relevant to our times.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Rushdie without prentention, 14 July 2003
By 
Compared to "The Buddha of suburbia", I felt "The black album" was a little overconstructed, self-conscious and the plot was maybe a bit farfetched. It lacked some of the lightness and humour which I really liked in "The Buddha..."
Still, this is a fine novel about identity and multiculturalism. Clever, straightforward, sparkling.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars SPLIT LOYALTIES, 19 Sep 2007
By 
Mr. T. WILKHU "Taran" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Black Album (Paperback)
Kureishi has brought up a number of issues which British-Asians go through everyday. His story has a number of twists and turns which keeps the reader captivated throughout from the main character's personal struggles Kureishi revisits territory familiar from his film-script "My Beautiful Laundrette" and his debut novel "The Buddha of Suburbia". A highly relevant story on multi-culturalism and the 'state of the nation' during the Thatcher years, focusing on relations between races and the predicament of British youth. More specifically it engages with the controversies surrounding the imposition of the fatwa on Salman Rushdie in 1989. Pre-occupied with popular culture and music, the novel takes it title from an album by Prince. Price is a key symbol within the text of the enabling potential of cultural hybridism in expanding received models of national and ethnic identity, thus challenging the fundamentalist of metropolitan racism and 3rd world politics alike. Recommended read!
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Some of the best stories I've ever read., 26 Jan 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Black Album (Paperback)
He's got style, but not in any exagerated sense. And anyway its the material that grabs you. Very human- the material, his characters aren't so much out of the ordinary, but Kureishi wrings out of them these cooly intense, never contrived kinds of feelings. More importantly I'm 22, Eritrean, grew up in CA, and I don't think I've ever read a book that made this kind of a connection with me. Anyway I think a lot of you displaced foreign born kids out there will really be vibing with his stuff.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book!, 3 April 2013
By 
A. Domonkos "A. D." (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This is a great story from 1980s 90s London with the message of Sex, Love, Rock n' Roll. Be open minded and don't be a racist...
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Evocative of London and what drives us, 20 May 2011
This review is from: The Black Album (Paperback)
Thought provoking read. Interesting perspective and great compostion: lines like "derilict young men" and his evocative and compassionate descriptions of human personality & activity and which pervade the London of his protagonists; not only an open and stimulating analysis of passions which drive us as individuals and groups, but it's also a great story.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nineties British multi-culturalism and confusion, 5 Sep 1996
By A Customer
This review is from: The Black Album (Paperback)
This is another fine book from Hanif Kureishi who seems above
all to be honest in what he writes; sufficiently non-literary
to appeal to a wide audience and yet intelligent and thoughtful
in his depiction of (in this case) the problems of identity
for anyone growing up in urban Britain. Funny, true, alarming,
exhilarating; well worth reading.
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The Black Album
The Black Album by Hanif Kureishi (Paperback - 1 April 1996)
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