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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read, both interesting and informative.
I bought The Raj at Table while traveling in India, and read it in one day. It gave me an interesting insight into Anglo-Indian cuisine. Although most of the book focuses on Indian influences on British cooking and the eating habits of the British in India, it also gives information on foodstuffs that were imported by the British, Portugese and other settlers and...
Published on 14 Aug 2001

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3.0 out of 5 stars Mostly of theoretical interest
This book describes rather in detail some aspects of the (obviously rather repetitive) diet of the Raj era, together with a quite good analysis of the origins of the Indian cuisine which has since been incorporated into the British. There are several period descriptions of house keeping routines of that era as well as numerous "authentic" recipies, most of them...
Published 10 months ago by International Law


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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read, both interesting and informative., 14 Aug 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Raj at Table: A Culinary History of the British in India (Paperback)
I bought The Raj at Table while traveling in India, and read it in one day. It gave me an interesting insight into Anglo-Indian cuisine. Although most of the book focuses on Indian influences on British cooking and the eating habits of the British in India, it also gives information on foodstuffs that were imported by the British, Portugese and other settlers and traders. It's hard to imagine Indian cooking without such basic ingredients as tomatoes and hot peppers, which were imported from S-America. There are many recipes in the book, some for such typically Anglo-Indian courses as mulligatawny, kedgeree, and curry powder, others for more traditional Indian food, like dhal and chutneys. Burton's style of writing makes the book very readable, blending historical facts, recipes and observations with ease. I recommend this book it to anyone who is interested in culinary history and the Raj-era in India.
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4.0 out of 5 stars good reading, 7 Jun 2014
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G. A. Hoff "gerry" (england , birmingham) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Raj at Table: A Culinary History of the British in India (Paperback)
quite interesting reading and parts of it are hilarious especially the part about the diners throwing food at each other this book is very interesting as we you get to know how the raj lived in india and the class divides throughout india its a book from a bygone age and myself who is anglo indian living in england it helps me understand more about how my forefathers lived in india
give it a try so next time you watch the film carry on up the kyber you will understand it more
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5.0 out of 5 stars Historical Raj culinary history, 20 Feb 2014
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This review is from: The Raj at Table: A Culinary History of the British in India (Paperback)
I recommend this as an informative and very well researched study of Colonial tastes during the Raj period in India.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Mostly of theoretical interest, 14 Feb 2014
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This review is from: The Raj at Table: A Culinary History of the British in India (Paperback)
This book describes rather in detail some aspects of the (obviously rather repetitive) diet of the Raj era, together with a quite good analysis of the origins of the Indian cuisine which has since been incorporated into the British. There are several period descriptions of house keeping routines of that era as well as numerous "authentic" recipies, most of them for a wide variation of almost identical curries: What I miss is some reporting (and advice) on how these recipies would turn out if attempted with modern day ingredients in modern kitchens: "Pounding in a mortar for 15 minutes" would probably be replaced by a short run in a food processor today, as would "slow fire" probably be equivalent to 175 C. in an oven. Without knowing which modern equipment works best to replace the old methods, trying to cook these dishes would probably include a long series of trial-and-error experimenting.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Culinary Raj, 3 Dec 2010
This review is from: The Raj at Table: A Culinary History of the British in India (Paperback)
Accurate, and thus a slightly uncomfortable account of British behaviour in India. Recipes are English versions of Indian cooking, and quantities large, as were appetites, apparently.
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The Raj at Table: A Culinary History of the British in India
The Raj at Table: A Culinary History of the British in India by David Burton (Paperback - 4 July 1994)
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