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on 5 May 2001
Investigating a series of strange events, the Brigadier pulls out a long unused device which sends a signal to the Doctor - in this case, in his sixth incarnation. What is the mystery that unites a spaceship shot down over England in 1944, strange demonic figures hidden in the shadows, and the final fate of Adolph Hitler?
Apparently written in three weeks when another book became unavoidably delayed, this book unites the current and previous editors of BBC's Doctor Who line of novels in a surprisingly well thought-through that combines fact and fiction into a coherent whole, while containing several plot twists that you probably won't see coming.
There is something about British writers which results in Hitler being portrayed as something more than just an evil dictator - and this book is no different. The combination of extreme disgust and morbid fascination adds some fuel to the already volatile mixture.
For a book of its pedigree (which would be a hastily bred mongrel), this is surprisingly good.
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on 26 February 2015
Before the Eleventh Doctor encounters Churchill and Hitler the Sixth Doctor visits them both in a novel concerned with the deaths of Hitler and Eva Braun and the fates of their bodies. There is, of course, a question of how aliens are involved. The story bears some fundamental similarities to the Tomorrow People serial ‘Hitler’s Last Secret’.

Unlike most of the novels re-released in this History Collection, “Shadows in the Glass” is not actually set in a historical period. Instead it is set primarily in the modern day (or at least modern day at the time the book was written). It uses a combination of journeys to periods during and just after the Second World War in the Tardis and of characters researching these times. As such it makes good use of time travel, which becomes an integral part of the plot.

One of the main points of interest in this book is that it teams up the Sixth Doctor and the Brigadier. It is not an obvious combination (the brief time they spend together in ‘Dimensions in Time’ doesn’t provide much of an impression). It’s hard to tell in this novel whether it actually works. The authors adapt the characters of both to make their interaction function satisfactorily. This isn’t the traditional Brigadier associated with the seventies. It is closer to the retired, living in a country house, married to Doris version that can be seen in the Seventh Doctor serial ‘Battlefield’. This mature Brigadier is of course very familiar with the Doctor and his various incarnations and more tolerant of his idiosyncrasies. It allows for him to deal with the brash, bolshiness of the Sixth Doctor better. It also makes him slip more into the role of a ‘traditional’ companion.

However, this is not the typical Sixth Doctor as seen on screen. Repetitive references to his flamboyant clothing are often used to characterise him in the novel. Of course, the Sixth Doctor is more than just his outfit as Colin Baker’s performance in Big Finish’s audio plays show. This though is not the audio version of the Sixth Doctor either. Sometimes the portrayal in the novel lies somewhere in between the two but more often than not he seems to be much closer to the Third Doctor. Some of this is clearly due to the presence of the Brigadier but the story content seems more suited to the Third Doctor and the writing does seem to lean that way. There also seems to be an odd preoccupation with the Doctor eating greedily. Despite Mel’s insistence on a diet in ‘Trial of a Time Lord’ (that wasn’t adequately explained) it doesn’t necessarily seem characteristic of the Sixth Doctor and really it is used in the novel to help out with some plot developments and provide amusement (which sometimes works, sometimes doesn’t).

The aliens are more of a plot device for pushing forward the story and making it possible, rather than the focus of the story. There is little we learn of them in terms of what they are and their civilisation/society. But they are probably not a strong enough alien to carry a whole story alone.

With a couple of twists in the latter stages it is an enjoyable novel.
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This is another in the series of ‘The History Collection’, original Doctor Who novels which have been previously published, and which are now re-issued as part of this 2015 novel collection. These stories are ones in which the Doctor has had an adventure in a historical setting. In this story, the Sixth Doctor finds himself called upon to help with an outstanding issue from the Second World War.

The authors have, for this new edition of the book, written an Introduction explaining why they both came to be sharing the authorship of this book. Both authors have a long relationship with Doctor Who, and with their own writing of novels, and their accomplished style shows in this collaborative work.

The story starts off with an unexpected airborne vessel which is shot down by the RAF over the small village of Turelhampton during the Second World War. The narrative moves then to 2001 (when the novel was originally published), when a journalist, Claire Aldwych, finds herself investigating a very strange series of events. Can she find a story amongst all this information? And can she stay alive long enough to do anything with it? The Brigadier, although retired, finds that his services and those of UNIT are again required to deal with incursions of alien beings, and calls upon the Doctor to assist. The Sixth Doctor is the one who turns up, slightly disgruntled at being at UNIT’s beck and call, but he soon enters into the spirit of the Brigadier’s concerns and the two of them, with Claire call upon all their investigative skills to find out what’s really going on in Turelhampton.

This is a complex story; it follows multiple timelines, and has a large cast throughout those timelines, all with their own strong motivations and characters. It’s not a light Doctor Who novel, by any means, and deals with difficult issues and harsh realities. The Sixth Doctor, and the Brigadier, are perfectly characterised throughout, and it is a delight to see the two of them working together in this novel. Definitely recommended.
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This is another in the series of ‘The History Collection’, original Doctor Who novels which have been previously published, and which are now re-issued as part of this 2015 novel collection. These stories are ones in which the Doctor has had an adventure in a historical setting. In this story, the Sixth Doctor finds himself called upon to help with an outstanding issue from the Second World War.

The authors have, for this new edition of the book, written an Introduction explaining why they both came to be sharing the authorship of this book. Both authors have a long relationship with Doctor Who, and with their own writing of novels, and their accomplished style shows in this collaborative work.

The story starts off with an unexpected airborne vessel which is shot down by the RAF over the small village of Turelhampton during the Second World War. The narrative moves then to 2001 (when the novel was originally published), when a journalist, Claire Aldwych, finds herself investigating a very strange series of events. Can she find a story amongst all this information? And can she stay alive long enough to do anything with it? The Brigadier, although retired, finds that his services and those of UNIT are again required to deal with incursions of alien beings, and calls upon the Doctor to assist. The Sixth Doctor is the one who turns up, slightly disgruntled at being at UNIT’s beck and call, but he soon enters into the spirit of the Brigadier’s concerns and the two of them, with Claire call upon all their investigative skills to find out what’s really going on in Turelhampton.

This is a complex story; it follows multiple timelines, and has a large cast throughout those timelines, all with their own strong motivations and characters. It’s not a light Doctor Who novel, by any means, and deals with difficult issues and harsh realities. The Sixth Doctor, and the Brigadier, are perfectly characterised throughout, and it is a delight to see the two of them working together in this novel. Definitely recommended.
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on 7 April 2001
As the book that shouldn't have been, The Shadow In the Glass may have been a disappointment, as it is it's amazing that something this good could have been produced in such a short time.
The Sixth Doctor books always tend to be good, but this one goes to the next level and is a contender for the title of the best Past Doctor Adventure that the BBC have published.
The characterisation of the Doctor and the Brigadier is spot on, the story is good, the writing is excellent and Justin Richards and Stephen Cole have produced a superbly entertaining book.
Unquestionably brilliant, this book is fantastic.
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on 22 May 2009
For a book that was allegedly thrown together at the last minute, the plot here is EXCELLENT. The under-used team of the Sixth Doctor and the Brigadier makes for an exceptional piece of work, as the Doctor's oldest friend unites with one of his most volitaile incarnations to solve the mystery of an abandoned village, resulting in the discovery of a conspiracy stretching all the way back to the Second World War...

Even after the discovery of what evidence 'contradicts' their theory- which is surprisingly minimal, when you think about it-, the reader cannot help but feel awed at the conspiracy created by Cole and Richards to explain the survival of Hitler's evil to the present, the subsequent confrontations between Hitler and the Doctor superbly expressing everything that has made both characters so captivating to so many audiences (Albeit in DRASTICALLY different ways)...

Indeed, the sole complaint about this book is the final fate of Claire Aldwych; while it made for an unexpected twist, I can't help but wish she could have stayed around to become a more permanent companion...
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on 8 May 2015
I don't think I can write much about this story as it would give away the plot and I wouldn't wish to spoil your enjoyment. So in this story the Doctor reunites with The Brigadier to fight aliens and Adolf Hitler, Justin Richards is an old hand at writing Who novels and this is one of his best he understands the character of the sixth Doctor and his some what abrasive relationships with people, this is a well plotted tale with a very satisfactory ending [however younger readers might find the climax distressing]. Another proviso is that this is a reprint of a story written as part of the new adventures series so there are references to other stories noticeably Terence Dicks 'The Players', however this is all explained in the introduction and should not spoil your enjoyment of the story.
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on 27 July 2015
I read this after reading 'Players', another 6th doctor book. I enjoyed that book, and after all these years belatedly started to accept the 6th doctor incarnation as interesting rather than just bad taste and arrogant .......so was encouraged to read this one. It's perhaps a little more silly in parts, but nevertheless again one of the better doctor who books, where you can both picture the doctor and get into a story that is not so simple and badly written that you could have written it in secondary school (no disrespect to secondary school kids!). The story is engaging throughout and does not peter out in the second half in the way that I find many doctor who novels do. Pretty good and worth a read this one.
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This book had to be written in a matter of weeks to fill a gap in the schedule, but you wouldn't think that from the writing, as it puts many that took the writers longer to shame.

Coming from dorset and having visited tyneham many times [the village that turelhampton is based on] some of this has a particular resonance for me. The book takes the sixth doctor and the brigadier, who never appeared together on screen, and teams them up. And they are a great duo that are superbly written. The villains are nasty and memorable, and so are the rest of the supporting cast. And you won't forget the end in a hurry as a result.

An excellent piece of work
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on 30 December 2012
It's nice to have a straightforward and lucidly written novel in this series; the complexity of some of them precludes the casual reader from investing, but this is great from start to finish. The Sixth Doctor and Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart are finally brought together, and they make a solid team - despite the Brig's advancing years. The mystery surrounding the seeming reappearance of Adolf Hitler from beyond the grave is well plotted and engrossing, although the token extra-terrestrials disappoint a little. Overall though a great adventure tale and a worthy addition to the ever-expanding Whoniverse.
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