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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful mood, gripping story.
After the over-the-top nature of the Faction Paradox arc, the Doctor Who books needed a little more grounding in reality and this is it. Not that this is a purely historical novel - the main plot concerns a fire monster - but it strikes a down-to-Earth (excuse the pun) mood, more gothic horror than insane sci-fi.
This is our first look at the "new" Doctor and my is...
Published on 4 Oct 2002

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars New story arc off to an average start
"The Burning" is the start of a new story arc for the Eighth Doctor. Stranded on Earth in the late nineteenth century without his TARDIS or memory after the events of "The Ancestor Cell", we find the Doctor caught up in events that relate to the fate of the village of Middletown, whose major source of employment (a mine) has just closed down...
Published on 19 Sep 2000


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful mood, gripping story., 4 Oct 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Burning (Mass Market Paperback)
After the over-the-top nature of the Faction Paradox arc, the Doctor Who books needed a little more grounding in reality and this is it. Not that this is a purely historical novel - the main plot concerns a fire monster - but it strikes a down-to-Earth (excuse the pun) mood, more gothic horror than insane sci-fi.
This is our first look at the "new" Doctor and my is it impressive. The writer's guidelines say that the Doctor should be viewed through the eyes of others to remain an engima, and this is one of the few times I've seen it work well. Without giving us a single look inside his head, Richards paints a picture of a very complex man; intelligent and incisive and compassionate, yet also rather detached. The ending - to give away nothing - is a powerful scene simply because it's the last thing you'd have expected the the "old" Doctor to do. I wouldn't have minded seeing more of this character.
Overall, this is a gripping book from start to finish, with great characters and a storyline that actually makes sense. (Although they never did explain the link between the TARDIS and the Burning.) Buy it. Read it. You won't be disappointed!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Hammer Horror Meets Who, 29 Dec 2003
By 
P. Baldowski "boreders.com" (Stockport, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Burning (Mass Market Paperback)
Post-Interference series, late nineteenth century. Middletown has industrialised itself intoan unprofitable corner, leaving the land-owner, Lord Urton, floundering for options. When Roger Nepath offers him one, however strange, the town - and potentially the world - are put in danger. And only The Doctor, and the small blue-black box in his pocket, stand between Nepath and the end of the world.
As the first book of a new arc, The Burning is a reasonable enough beginning, steeped in mystery and mysticism. In hindsight, it reads like a Hammer horror film - and Peter Cushing's Doctor might have been better suited for the main role (if spiked with a little less grandfatherliness and more monster-mashing chutzpah), with Christopher Lee as Nepath. This is the sort of horror tale that sees people killed because they seem to lack the commonsense and balance to know when and how to run.
At times it feels sluggish, in that I felt the need to move on, peeking ahead through the pages to see what lay ahead. The Earthbound environment, following a lot of stories on aliens worlds, or in alien times, may be at fault for making me feel that way. However, the need to forge ahead and see what happens next seems to have had something to do with the engaging storyline and the loathsome characters - so, it comes recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars New Direction=Excellent Book, New feel, 25 Aug 2000
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Burning (Mass Market Paperback)
This book starts off the "new" era in the EDA's- after the resolution of a great deal of plotlines in the last book "The Ancestor Cell". Justin Richards (the man now in charge of the BBC Dr. Who Book range) kicks things off, and there is definitely a new tone. The Doctor is a changed man; a little darker, more direct, definitely more focused. I love it! This is just the beginning of the "Caught on Earth" story arc (which spans "the Burning", "Casualties of War", "The Turing Test", "Endgame", "Father Time" and "Escape Velocity"). As of right now, only "The Burning" is out. I found the aspect of the Doctor's amnesia well handled and added a new dimension to the character. While the Doctor's character will be expounded upon over the course of the six books, this is indeed a promising start- highly recommended
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Burning brighter than a falling star, 24 Jan 2012
By 
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Burning (Mass Market Paperback)
With his planet and his people gone, the Doctor, literally a man without a name, awakens on Earth at the turn of the 20th century in a carriage, amnesiac, with only a tiny blue box and a letter from a mysterious `Fitz' asking to meet him at St Louis on February 8th 2001 in his coat pocket.

`The Burning' by Doctor Who luminary Justin Richards was one of the first classic Doctor Who novels I read. Having read the graphic novel collections of Scott Gray's run on the Eighth Doctor in Doctor Who Magazine, and established a firm image and characterisation of one of the most complex and deeply passionate, humanised, incarnations of the Last of the Time Lords, I was wholly unprepared for diving into where it all began.

`The Burning' reinvents and reinterprets the Doctor Who mythos, heralding a new beginning in the Doctor's life, and readers alike. The Doctor here is a blank slate: a chance to be someone else, to be human for once. No longer does the Doctor have to `act' human, or project a human side, so as to not alienate the human companions that have taken up so much of his lifetimes, filling the long periods of loneliness in his long life. He can finally form human relationships, experience human love and loss, as is explored in the subsequent `Earth Arc' as it has become known. By cutting the cord to Gallifrey, and thus the weighted burden of his Time Lord responsibilities, the Doctor can finally adopt Earth as his home-from-home. He has become a blood-brother to the human race. He is a fallen angel seeking redemption for the sins of his tumultuous and tenebrous past. To quote show-runner Steven Moffat: "I think of the Doctor as an angel that aspires to be human".

I highly recommend `The Burning' for anyone interested in not only one of the more fascinating periods in Doctor Who's history, but for anyone who is interested in finding out what it's all about. It's a perfect place to start. You don't need to know anything about the character or his history: that's something for you both to discover (or re-discover) together.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "Who... Am... I...?", 8 Mar 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Burning (Mass Market Paperback)
Justin Richards has always been, in my opinion, one of those, um, 'dependable' authors - never writing a classic, but never really churning out something hideously bad (oh alright, 'Tears of the Oracle' was rubbish).
So it comes as some surprise that 'The Burning' was so much better than I was hoping for. I was expecting it to be... mediocre at best, but it turned out to be a very thrilling little novel. The 'new' Eighth Doctor was interesting to read about, and the book's main threat, the 'burning' creature, was pretty scarey, reminding me of many 'Who' monsters that I found creepy as a child in the seventies.
There should be something in 'The Burning' for 'Who' fans old and new alike.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A highly enjoyable new beginning for the Doctor, 30 Aug 2000
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Burning (Mass Market Paperback)
How refreshing it is to read a story that isn't bogged down by continuity references and that's coming from someone who normally enjoys stories like that. The characters are first rate, especially the Doctor, who is now back to the mysterious figure he was, way back in 1963 and this holds great promise for the Earth-arc novels. If you've avoided the 8th Doctor novels until now then this is the book to start from, no knowledge of previous stories is required and this story is first rate - miss it at your peril!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A highly enjoyable new beginning for the Doctor, 30 Aug 2000
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Burning (Mass Market Paperback)
How refreshing it is to read a story that isn't bogged down by continuity references and that's coming from someone who normally enjoys stories like that. The characters are first rate, especially the Doctor, who is now back to the mysterious figure he was, way back in 1963 and this holds great promise for the Earth-arc novels. If you've avoided the 8th Doctor novels until now then this is the book to start from, no knowledge of previous stories is required and this story is first rate - miss it at your peril!
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5.0 out of 5 stars !!JUST GO BUY IT!!, 1 Feb 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Burning (Mass Market Paperback)
This book is a great example of why we love DR Who? he is a man of mystery and until quite a bit in to the book its hard to know which of 3 chars. he is dont let anything put you off reading this book. I am converted. and that takes some doing ! and yes Paul IS the eighth Doctor I couldnt say just how but he IS. past Dr novels give you the warm childhood glow of nostalgia but this is all NEW stuff BRING IT ON . ps hands up those of you who have toyed with the idea of going to St. louis in feb?
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5.0 out of 5 stars A new start for the Dr Who novels..., 20 Aug 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Burning (Mass Market Paperback)
This is terrific-a new start for the Dr Who novels that lives and breathes excitement. All who have given up on the books should look back in here, here is none of the baggage of recent years. The Doctor has amnesia and has lost his TARDIS. Who is he? Why is he in late 19th Century Derbyshire? And what is the crack that divides the countryside and leads straight to hell? Miss at your peril!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars New story arc off to an average start, 19 Sep 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Burning (Mass Market Paperback)
"The Burning" is the start of a new story arc for the Eighth Doctor. Stranded on Earth in the late nineteenth century without his TARDIS or memory after the events of "The Ancestor Cell", we find the Doctor caught up in events that relate to the fate of the village of Middletown, whose major source of employment (a mine) has just closed down.
Enter the mysterious Roger Nepath, traveller and collector of artefacts which relate to the topic of fire, and his plan to reopen the mine?
As is normal with the Doctor, he turns up and all hell breaks loose, although that looks like more than a turn of phrase in this book. The cast of characters in this book are quite well-defined, although some of them undergo a transformation in fairly short order.
The actual nature of the menace is kept concealed for much of the book, although from the title, the striking cover, and the number of times early chapters end with the phrase "And the burning.", you're on safe ground betting that it has something to do with fire. While the revelation is not something new in Doctor Who, it should take quite a few people by surprise.
My one complaint is that Justin Richards, who is he BBC's consultant on its range of Doctor Who books, didn't really give me a strong impression that the Doctor has lost his memory. There are a couple of things he should have recognised, but other than being told he has no memory a few times I didn't really get that impression.
Not the most auspicious start for a new story arc. A book which spent more time on the changes in the Doctor's circumstances would have been better, with this perhaps the second. Still, it's worth seeing where this is taking us.
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Doctor Who: The Burning
Doctor Who: The Burning by Justin Richards (Mass Market Paperback - 7 Aug 2000)
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