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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 12 Jun 2007
By 
A reader (brighton, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks[1967] (Original BBC Television Soundtrack) (Audio CD)
Despite, bar a single episode, only surviving on audio I'd put this as one of my all-time favourite Whos. Patrick Troughton puts in, as ever, a stupendous performance but the motivations of non-regulars such as Waterfield, Maxtible and even the adventure's first casualty are complex and thoughtful; unlike later years, there are no 'throwaway' characters and cardboard cut-outs here. Instead we have a rich tapestry of competing viewpoints and agendas, behind which lurk the quietly scheming Daleks (I always prefer the adventures where the Daleks are wily and in the background to where they just act like talking tanks).

It's also a very pacy story - the narrative never lets up and maintains your attention by shifting, logically, between three different, imaginatively rendered locations - mid-20th century and mid-19th century England and Skaro. By the time we're confronted by the Emperor Dalek it's achieved a very epic feel without sacrificing the smaller human dramas it so carefully sets up. Highly, highly recommended.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magical !, 20 Feb 2011
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks[1967] (Original BBC Television Soundtrack) (Audio CD)
Back in the early 1980's, the only way to experience vintage Dr Who was through the medium of fan circulated audio tapes (usually pretty dire sound quality) containing soundtracks of the various stories. I well remember the magic of sitting over my tape recorder listening through the static as these stories unfolded. The tricky bit was visualising what was happening during periods without dialogue. The story reviews in Dr Who Monthly and the Target novelisations were invaluable for this. Now of course we have these wonderful clear recordings, complete with linking narration and what a treat they are. Nothing can completely compensate for the criminal loss of these stories on video, but these CD releases are superb, bring some classic Dr Who back to life and transport me straight back to my childhood. Highly recommended !
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Evil of the Daleks: Essential, 19 Sep 2013
By 
Dickie "The Bear" (Berkshire, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks[1967] (Original BBC Television Soundtrack) (Audio CD)
This audio, much like the others, are a more important aspect to the history of Doctor Who (and television) arguably more so than the tapes and DVD's currently available. Though nothing can completely replace what was lost, the quality of this audio book is more than enough to recapture the essence of this lost story. Long considered to be the greatest story by fans, Evil of the Daleks is surely nothing short of epic for its time; set in three distinct locations and time zones with a plot that takes various twists and turns and is very memorable. The narration provided by Frazer Hines is crisp, clear and appropriate so that it doesn't clash with the natural audio and really allows you to get invested in the drama, characters and peril. If there's a criticism at all it would be that the audio format doesn't completely satisfy with episodes 6 and 7 where you feel that the format hinders the obvious epic scale of the Skaro finale that was best suited for the screen. However this is a minor niggle in the context of what has survived and what hasn't and Evil of the Daleks does remain a fast paced and thrilling classic adventure that closes the first Doctor/Dalek era. Essential.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Greatest Dalek Story Of All Time!!!, 24 Jan 2012
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks[1967] (Original BBC Television Soundtrack) (Audio CD)
The Evil of the Daleks is my all-time favouite Dalek Who serial. Broadcast between 20th May and 1 July 1967 this story closed season 4 of Doctor Who, one of the greatest seasons during the shows run. The first time I saw Evil was via the unbelievable Loose Cannon Reconstruction, I fell in love with it and have never looked back. The only problem with the reconstruction was that they used the unnarrated soundtrack, and although crystal clear, lacked Frazer Hines brilliant narration. The BBC double CD release solves this minor problem. The audio has been lovingly restored by Mark Ayres of the Doctor Who Restoration Team. His groundbreaking work on missing Doctor Who audio soundtracks has aided in keeping these missing classics from becoming forgotten classics.

On to the story itself. The Doctor and Jamie have just seen the TARDIS stolen, they begin to investigate who is involved when they are kidnapped by a man named Waterfield and transported back in time 100 years to 1866. Once there they become embroiled in an attempt by the Daleks to discover the Human factor, the natural ability of Humans to defeat the Daleks and survive for millenia. As the experiment progresses, the Doctor and co. are then taken to the Daleks homeworld Skaro, where the Dalek Emperor has been using the Doctor all along to find the Dalek factor. The humanised Daleks begin a rebellion in the city on Skaro and in the end the Daleks, The Emperor and even the Human Daleks are all destroyed and the Doctor stands on the edge of oblivion and states..."the final end"...

What makes the Evil of the Daleks special is that it is set in 3 different time zones, 1966, 1866 and future Skaro. This works really well as it keeps the story fresh and alive, the 1866 episodes are my personal favouries as they are realised very well by the designers. Such great actors like Marius Goring, John Bailey, Sonny Caldinez and of course Patrick Troughton really add realism to the serial and that for me creates an absolute classic.

I really could not recommend this Pat Troughton classic any more, so please go and buy the CD release or grab hold of a Loose Cannon Productions reconstruction if needed as you will not be disappointed with The Evil of the Daleks.

Many thanks for your time,

M.B.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'OBEY THE DALEKS! YOU ARE IN OUR POWER!', 2 Sep 2009
By 
M. Pye "north western fells" (Britain) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks[1967] (Original BBC Television Soundtrack) (Audio CD)
'Evil' was the last Dalek story of the 60's, and in my opinion, is a great story to end this era for Dr Who.
Plot: The Daleks, having stolen the Tardis and had the Doctor and Jamie brought back in time to Victorian England, want the Doctor to conduct a experiment to find the 'Human factor', so that they can impant it in themselves and thus defeat the human race. The Doctor, threatened with the destruction of the Tardis if he dosn't agree, reluctently carries out the Experiment, which involves Jamie rescuing the daughter of a victorian scientist forced to work with the Daleks, and having Jamie's instincs and emotions he has during the rescue being recorded and impanted into test daleks. The results of the experiments are surising, but a journey to Skaro revels the Emperor Dalek's true intentions...
Pros: This story see's a number of first's in Dr Who. It's the first time the Emperor Dalek is seen, and is also the first time that the line between daleks and humans is blurred, if you get what I mean. The overall plot is a very good one, the characters are great, and daleks are also brilliant.
Cons: The time travel machien the victorian scientists invent, a device which uses static electricity to propell a reflected mirror image through time, is very unlikely to work in the real world. Also, I think personally that at 7 episodes, it's a bit long. It could, I think, be compressed into 5.
Apart from this, it's another great Dr Who story, and olnly the above stops me from making it 5 out of 5.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The final end?, 15 Aug 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks[1967] (Original BBC Television Soundtrack) (Audio CD)
Released individually this time (originally part of THE DALEK TINSET from last November,) it remains to be seen how successful an individual CD only release of this classic story will become. But at 16.99 it is an excellent purchase regardless of whether you have the tin or not (of which I personally thought was of poor quality...)
'Evil of the Daleks' is in my opinion, the first real attempt by the BBC to bring Doctor Who to an adult audience. We must remember that this story was orginally broadcast in 1967 by which point, the series and more importantly, the Daleks had been around for some four years. Consdiering that this story was intended to be the 'end' of the Daleks, it is fair to say that the production team were trying to introduce new methods and ideas to the show. Witness at this point the regeneration of Hartnell into Troughton - it seems logical therefore, that if Hartnell, the first of two who helped to cement the series is replaced, then the Daleks, who were also instrumental in the beginning, could also be written out.
Evil of the Daleks is seen as a classic by fans - but in reality, is this the case? At seven episodes, it was one of the longer stories at the time, but unlike previous stories of a similar length, the listner is always occupied with the plot, and the seven episodes whizz to the chilling climax.
Similarly, the characterisation of the story is excellent and each of the roles are aptly defined. The double act of the reluctant scientist Waterfield - terrified by the Daleks, bullied by Maxtable and fearful for his daughter and Maxtable - the greedy, self obsessed scientist with a ludicrous dream to transmute metal into gold, reflect this new adult theme. Although the Daleks are present, their characterisations are more effective at reflecting the difference between 'good' and 'evil' than those of the Daleks.
Similarly, Troughton's Doctor is made more sinister - at the original time of transmission (one episode per week and the end of season 4) the viewer did not know whether the Doctor himself had turned traitor against his friends. As always, compliments must go to Troughton for his performance - so far, I have yet to listen to any of his stories in which he is off par.
The Daleks themselves are kept in the background compared to their previous adventures, although essential to the plot, they do not drive it. Similarly, they do not walk around merely shouting 'Exterminate' as has been the case in the past, and Whitaker's story portrays them as cunning, ruthless creatures and a worthy foe for the Doctor. The sole apperance of the Emperor Dalek, what this story is remembered for, is effective, giving the Daleks substance and a hierarchy. His preachings that 'The Dalek race will live forever,' is a subtle pun on the fading 'Dalekmania' at the time and implies that the series is finally moving to something different.
As with all these BBC releases, they are of excellent quality, and Hines' narration is much better than that of the original Tom Baker cassette release in the 1990's. Whilst fans would love to see the real visuals, the true saving grace with this audio release is that it keeps the classic story as that: a classic. The listener is able to visualise the epic civil war with the special effects of a blockbuster film and not, as was the true case, toy Daleks fighting with lots of gunge spewing out of them.
Perhaps, the audio CD's real purpose is to keep the mythical status of this excellent story alive - recent finds of 'lost' episodes have been met with disappointment i.e. Tomb of the Cybermen.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Troughton Delivers Another Classic Dalek Adventure, 9 April 2014
By 
Timelord007 (The Tardis) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks[1967] (Original BBC Television Soundtrack) (Audio CD)
CD Info.
3xCD of a 7 episode audio soundtrack adventure, Running time 175 minutes approx.

Trivia.
1)Only episode 2 of this classic tv adventure is held in the BBC Archives, Episode 1,3-7 are all currently missing.
2)Originally transmitted 20th May - 1July 1967.
3)This was the final Dalek story for 5 year's as creator Terry Nation revoked the BBC rights to use his creations as he was trying to get a Dalek spin off series off the ground featuring Jean Marsh as Sara Kingdom.
4)Daleks the Destroyers Terry Nations unfilmed pilot was adapted for Big Finish productions & available as part of the Second Doctor Lost Stories box set.
5)Sonny Caldinez played several Ice Warrior's in 4 appearances, In this story he plays Kemel.
6)Windsor Davis is better known for It Ain't Half Hot Mum, Never The Twain & a few Carry On movies.
7)John Peel adapted this story for a Target novelisation in 1993 with stunning artwork by Alister Pearson.
8)Anneke Wills & Michael Craze were contacted for 2 episodes of this story but were let go at the end of the previous story The Faceless Ones.
9)Only 2 of 3 Dalek story's not to be written by Terry Nation.

Synopsis.
The Daleks entrap the Second Doctor & want him to instill the Human Factor into their conscience, If implanted it will make the Daleks invincible & rulers of the galaxy.

Jamies faith in the Doctor is tested to the very limits as it seems the Doctor is collaborating with the Daleks to aid them but everything isn't as it appears as the Doctor has a few tricks up his sleeve.

But the Daleks must never be underestimated!

Timelord Thoughts.
This 7 episode epic written by David Whitaker once again demonstrates just how menacing the Daleks can be given the right material & David Whitaker certainty delivered the goods here in what is one of the best Dalek story's ever made.

Patrick Troughton once again gives a scene stealing performance & dominates this entire adventure letting us believe he's working to aid the Daleks while all the time plotting there downfall & it's this sleight of hand that Patrick Troughton does so well in all his performances as the Doctor.

This story also sets a interesting dynamic between the Doctor & Jamie develop as Jamie starts doubting the Doctor's intentions adding great drama to the plot.

Finally the Daleks are once again at there sinister & cunning best in this adventure which was initially intended to be the final Dalek story in Doctor Who.

Sadly 6 episodes have been missing over 47 year's so it's unlikely we'll ever see these episodes but thankfully wirh this remastered audio soundtrack we as fan's can at least hear it.

Outstanding story & well worth a purchase if your a fan of Doctor Who.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Dalek Factor, 30 Jan 2012
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks[1967] (Original BBC Television Soundtrack) (Audio CD)
'The Evil of the Daleks' is a story worth having. It's exciting, it's clever, and it's seven episodes of non-stop Dalek action. One of the best Dalek stories of the 1960s coupled together with 'The Power of the Daleks', and happens to be the season finale of Patrick Troughton's first year of Doctor Who.

There's only one episode of `The Evil of the Daleks' that exists - Episode 2 - which is found on the 'Lost in Time' DVD that features all the lost episodes from the 60s. This really shocked me as I didn't think that all but one of the episodes have been wiped from the BBC Archives. The Audio CD is the only way we can enjoy `Evil' in its entirety, unless you wish to see telesnaps which in my opinion aren't really exciting. It'll have to take a long while before they can actually animate the missing episodes for a complete story on DVD.

But saying that, the CD is worth having as we get to listen to the linking narration by Frazer Hines, who plays Jamie in that story. It's nice to listen to the story with Frazer narrating as it helps to know where the story is going. This is fairly obvious as the story was made for television and it would be difficult to know what sounds come and what people are doing when there they aren't exactly talking, which is very different compared to an audio or radio play.

With Episode 2, I was able to refer to the characters in regarding with what they looked like on audio with clarity. Also the episode seemed exciting to watch with all the suspense going on and being able to cut to the chase with the Doctor and Jamie being captured and taken back in time to 1866. Episode 2 also happens to feature the very first appearance of new companion Victoria Waterfield (Deborah Watling), which I'll talk about later. I also like the confrontation between the Doctor and the Dalek that comes out when it's revealed who's behind all this. It's the only time we get to see Patrick Troughton confronting the Daleks in that one episode out of seven. I found the Dalek killing Kennedy moment very chilling and it certainly adds a lot of menace to the story considering it's Roy Skelton first time to play the Daleks in that story.

Now that I've talked about the CD and Episode 2, it's onto the story itself...

`Evil' is a story about the Daleks capturing the Doctor in 1966 and bringing him back a hundred years in the past to help them with an experiment to provide the `human factor'. I really like the setting of 1966 in episode one and hearing the 60s music in the background when the Doctor and Jamie are in the coffee shop on audio. The shift from 1966 to 1866 was truly inspirational and it gives the story a classic feel reminding me of all the Victorian drama I watched.

Of course as I've said before, this story introduces us to the new companion Victoria. I've met Deborah Watling recently who was lovely, and asked her to sign the sleeve notes of this story at a convention (and also Frazer Hines at another convention). Her role in this story is quite brief, considering she's in the captivity of the Daleks for most of the story. But it's a nice way to introduce Victoria, whose father gets killed and she's let in by the Doctor and Jamie at the end of the story to join them in their travels in time and space. I'm pleased that the first episode of Victoria Waterfield (Episode 2) has survived as we get to see how she started out on television as a character. I also like the idea of a Victorian girl travelling in the TARDIS, and put that with a Highlander and a Time Lord it makes a pretty good team. And her relationship with her father is heart-warming, and it's really upsetting that he had to be taken away from her at the end. I also like the relationship she had with the mute wrestler Kembel, as it signifies more to this lovely girl than meets the eye. I've had a nice chat with Debbie about her time on Doctor Who, how much she liked working with Patrick Troughton and how sad it is that most of the stories she was in are now wiped from the BBC archives. Ah well, you can't have everything, can you?

Patrick Troughton and Frazer Hines are also brilliant in this. Patrick comes into his own with this story, as he's grasped the part of the Doctor wonderfully in making the character his own. As this is the season finale, he becomes really heroic and thoughtful in this story, as he crafts together his own plans whilst he's playing the part of the fool. That moment when the Doctor passes through the archway to condition him as a Dalek really made me wonder whether this was the end for the Doctor. But of course the Doctor isn't human and he manages to outwit the Daleks once more. His relationship with Jamie has developed in this story and it's at its most strongest. Those scenes where Jamie doesn't seem to trust the Doctor and they have arguments are quite hard to listen to, but it works for some really good character development between the two. It's obvious that Patrick and Frazer work well together and that they have some good moments in terms of comedy and drama. I enjoy seeing them together and those comedy moments coming out like the one where the Doctor tells Jamie not to knock anything over in the antique shop and then he knocks something over with Jamie catching it just in time are really good. It's nice that Jamie gets more to do in this story since Polly and Ben left in the previous story, and he comes into his own as being heroic in rescuing Victoria, defying the Daleks, and having a healthy interest in women. This is where Jamie's character really starts to work well as a companion and it's good that continues to develop in future stories.

The supporting characters in this story are interesting as well. I like the troubled character of Edward Waterfield, Victoria's father, as he's desperate for her daughter to be returned safely to him by the Daleks that he will go to great lengths to capture the Doctor and Jamie. His horror of the Daleks' callous disregard for humans and killing them without a second thought makes you really sympathise with Waterfield as he realises what he's getting himself into. I also like the Theodore Maxtible character, who seems to be gentlemanly and intelligent at first, but then his greed for wealth overwhelms him that it is revealed that he made a bargain with the Daleks and that he was responsible for Victoria getting captured by the Daleks that you really want to loathe him. His Dalek conditioning towards the end, pays the price for what he's done. I also like the Mr. Perry and Kennedy characters in Episodes One and Two as well as the Mollie Dawson character, who I think is really sweet and such a nice character.

The Dalek Emperor makes his first appearance in this story of Doctor Who. I remember watching 'The Parting of the Ways' from the new series where the Dalek Emperor appeared. The Emperor in this story is far different from the one I saw in `The Parting of the Ways' when I saw the photos of the emperor in `Evil'. But I can still imagine the foreboding presence of the Dalek Emperor when I listened to the audio and was really thrilled to bits when hearing the Doctor's confrontation with the Emperor. The cliffhanger moment in Episode 6 was really thrilling as I was eager to know what would happen to the Doctor and Jamie when threatened by the Emperor to implant the Human Factor in the human race.

I also love the friendly human Daleks in the story - Alpha, Beta and Omega. I can't help but giggle at hearing those three Daleks' friendly if somewhat deranged manner when chatting to the Doctor and Jamie or when talking to `normal' Daleks. It adds comedy to it and how interesting that these Daleks can speak very unusual things to what they would normally say in character terms. Their questioning of Dalek orders makes them unique and I like the moments when they question and stand up for themselves against the unconditioned Daleks. I wonder if they've managed to survive the `final end'.

Speaking of the `final end', the Dalek civil war on Skaro with all the huge explosions and the Dalek Emperor shouting `Do not fight in here' made the story seem really epic. I saw some surviving footage of that `final end' and really thought those scenes made the whole thing climatic as it was intentional that this is final appearance of the Daleks ever - which of course never happens.

The CD extras at the end are quite interesting. There's a nice audio except from the repeat transmission of `Evil', Episode 1, with an audio narration of Patrick Troughton and Wendy Padbury who plays Zoe when he shows her the Daleks after the events of 'The Wheel In Space'. It makes me wonder why the repeat of `Evil' was never saved for a future repeat so that we can see all seven episodes in the archives. Also there's the closing scenes from the Doctor and the human Daleks confronting the Black Daleks to the Doctor saying the `final end' over the final explosion of the Dalek city (without any narration). There's audio excepts of how they did the explosions as well as some Dalek voice sessions from `The Power of the Daleks'.

All in all then, `The Evil of the Daleks' is a very good Doctor Who story and I enjoyed it thoroughly. There's so much to talk about `Evil' that I don't have time for, but I'll let you find out about it yourself and see what you think of it. But `Evil' is definitely worthy of a listen, or a watch if you're willing to buy the 'Lost in Time' DVD and see Episode 2 of the story for reference.

The next story for the Doctor, Jamie and Victoria is 'The Tomb of the Cybermen'.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Evil of the Dalaks, 25 July 2013
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks[1967] (Original BBC Television Soundtrack) (Audio CD)
This is a classic so sad that there is only one epsiode remaining I would recommend this to Dr Who fans
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Daleks go out with a bang (for the moment..,), 28 Jan 2007
By 
M. Wilberforce "mwilberforce" (Bristol, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks[1967] (Original BBC Television Soundtrack) (Audio CD)
"The Evil of the Daleks", by David Whitaker, ends the fourth season of Doctor Who with a bang. Originally intended to be the last appearance of the Daleks (and indeed this turned out to be the case for some years), "The Evil of the Daleks" builds up to an explosive finale in which we finally get to meet the leader of the Dalek race (a gigantic wall-mounted creature of which only a photographic record now exists).

At seven episodes, "Evil" is long enough to contain three distint sections: a short section set on contemporary Earth, the main body of the story set in the 1860s, and the final couple of episodes set on Skaro. Of these seven episodes only episode two survives, but it thankfully gives us a glimpse of the Victorian setting and the main supporting players, helping to ground the audio version of the story in a visual context.

"Evil" is a well-loved story and is higher rated by many than "The Power of the Daleks". However, I feel "Power" to be the more interesting of the two, featuring characters with more complex motivations. "Evil" is closer to conventional sci-fi, but with the bonus of having Daleks rampaging around a Victorian country house. The principal supporting characters of Edward Waterfield (John Bailey) and Theodore Maxtible (Marius Goring) are well-played, meanwhile companion-to-be Victoria (Deborah Watling) starts as she means to continue: as a whimpering wreck. I find the best thing about the story to be the friction that develops between the Doctor and Jamie as the Scot begins to doubt the Doctor's motivations: this strand of the story offers Frazer Hines' character greater substance and drive than he normally possesses, and leads to some good moments between Jamie and the mute Kemel (Sonny Caldinez).

The final moments of the story, including the destruction of the Dalek base, are now left only to our imagination due to the absence of so much of the video material. None the less, "The Evil of the Daleks" is an enjoyable audio adventure that is enthusiastically narrated by Frazer Hines.
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