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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Atilla the Hun - John Mann
I was in two minds whether to buy this book, having read Paul Cassidy's review, which pretty much summed up how I felt after reading the author's Ghenghis Khan. I did buy it, however, and am glad I did. Apart from an overlong account of the resurrection of mounted archery, John Mann successfully paints a picture of Atilla, the Huns, the decaying Roman empire and an age...
Published on 5 Oct. 2006 by pend

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3.0 out of 5 stars Thee 'Hun'
The name Attila, the Hun, has long been synonymous with barbarism, savagery and violence. This classic biography reveals the man behind the myth and how, between 434-454 AD, the fate of Europe hung upon the actions of one man, Attila, king of the Huns. The Roman Empire still stood as the rock of civilisation in the Western World dominating most of Europe from its twin...
Published on 17 Jan. 2010 by David I. Howells


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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Atilla the Hun - John Mann, 5 Oct. 2006
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This review is from: Attila The Hun: A Barbarian King and the Fall of Rome (Paperback)
I was in two minds whether to buy this book, having read Paul Cassidy's review, which pretty much summed up how I felt after reading the author's Ghenghis Khan. I did buy it, however, and am glad I did. Apart from an overlong account of the resurrection of mounted archery, John Mann successfully paints a picture of Atilla, the Huns, the decaying Roman empire and an age that has left little by way of contemporary written history. He does this in a readable narrative style, clearly points out where the facts are thin and speculation needed, and debunks many of the myths that grew over the centuries following Atilla's death and are accepted by many today as fact. I enjoyed reading it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I want more...but there is nothing !, 4 July 2009
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This review is from: Attila The Hun: A Barbarian King and the Fall of Rome (Paperback)
I personally enjoyed the book. It is very readable, not dry or boring. Sure he doesn't only write about Attila, he also writes about Horsemanship and archery -what made the Huns terrible- about his camp -no they were not completly nomads- but also of the historians he met and the places he visited in Hungary...sure this is not directly information on our hero, but it doesn't do the book any harm neither ! I liked the book alot, especcially since mr. man keeps himself to the facts, there are barely any personal opinions included !!!!
Although there is not much info on Attila available, this books wants you to know MORE...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Attila the Man, 13 Mar. 2009
This review is from: Attila The Hun: A Barbarian King and the Fall of Rome (Paperback)
I didn't know an awful lot about Attila the Hun before reading this book, all I had heard was that it was he who finally instigated the fall of the Roman Empire, and obviously was a vicious, hairy, ugly and generally nasty man.

Reading this book was definitely an education in understanding Attila the Man as well as Attila the Hun. As well as summarising the history of events leading to the decay of the Roman Empire, it shows us as much as possible about the hun way of life and what kind of a man Attila must have been, and what impression he gave to those few who actually visited him face to face, not necessarily the vicious and nasty man I had imagined.

Great introduction to this period in history, well worth reading, especially for those with an interested in the art of mounted archery!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BRILLIANT. "Attlia for Dummies" just won't do, 11 Jun. 2008
This review is from: Attila The Hun: A Barbarian King and the Fall of Rome (Paperback)
I am astonished at some of the other reviews that seem, unjustly, to slate John Man's writing. What he has done is take a historical figure of incredible experience, drawn on the historical sources and his own experiences which cannot be over looked, and come up with a very detailed and most excellent account of an overlooked but MAJOR historical figure. A great account of a great man and a great read by a great historian.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Compelling Read, 13 Oct. 2006
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J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Attila The Hun: A Barbarian King and the Fall of Rome (Paperback)
Is it me, or are modern days authors making historical books that much more readable. Most of the historical books I have read recently are far removed from the dusty old volumes that lay mouldering in the bookcase or on the shelves of the library. Mainly, I believe because the contents inside the book are as dry and dusty as the outside and of little value to anyone other than a scholar.

This book is written with a light touch, making it refreshingly readable without straying from the facts. If more books were written in this way, history would become a rare treat, rather than something that is there mainly for the academic.

Although most schoolboys know the name Attila, a man who was known for his barbarism, and some may even be able to tell you that he was instrumental in holding the fate of the Roman Empire in his hands. Very little else is known about the man himself and the warriors he led.

In the early 5th century AD Attila and his warriors earned an undying reputation for savagery, the like of which had never been seen. His empire briefly rivalled that of Rome, reaching from the Rhine to the Black Sea, the Baltic to the Balkans.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Thee 'Hun', 17 Jan. 2010
This review is from: Attila The Hun: A Barbarian King and the Fall of Rome (Paperback)
The name Attila, the Hun, has long been synonymous with barbarism, savagery and violence. This classic biography reveals the man behind the myth and how, between 434-454 AD, the fate of Europe hung upon the actions of one man, Attila, king of the Huns. The Roman Empire still stood as the rock of civilisation in the Western World dominating most of Europe from its twin capitals of Rome and Constantinople. However it was being threatened by a new force in the form of the much-feared Barbarian hordes. It was Attila who united the Barbarian tribes into a united and effective army. Attila launched two devastating attacks against both halves of the Roman Empire, which earned his reputation for mindless devastation and brutality. Attila's campaigns brought an end to Rome's pre-eminence in Europe but after his rather unusual death (read the book) the barbarian hordes reverted back to uncoordinated regional or tribal groups and relative in obscurity. A ruthless but brilliant leader, Attila was also a wily politician who used a network of titled personage to gather intelligence on his behalf. In addition, as were all of the great leaders of his day, Attila was also not averse to using torture on his enemies or on those who simply displeased him. There is a rather interesting section in the book that refers to his unpleasant and gruesome form of impaling! There is another interesting section which explains the successful role and tactics of his `Parthian' archers who did so much to win Attila's battles. If he had a fault it was that he failed to ensure a strong successor to his mantle of barbarian leadership, which ensured the collapse of his empire after his death.

This book is an enjoyable read and is concentrated with an amazing amount of factual, well researched information. If anything it provides a scholarly insight to Attila but I didn't find it a particularly gripping read. I didn't find the book grabbed my attention as much as I would have liked. It's my first John Man book but I have `Genghis Ghan' already lined up on the bookshelf.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Easy read but not perfect, 9 Feb. 2015
By 
D. J. Favager (Wirral) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Attila The Hun: A Barbarian King and the Fall of Rome (Paperback)
Having paid all of 25p for this in a library sale I was fairly happy that I had got value for money! It was a light, easy read with some fairly entertaining material - narrative, speculation etc - and while the critical comments made by other reviewers are fair enough (not much about the main man, some rather over long sections on fairly marginal stuff etc) it is a decent enough introduction to late Roman history. There may be a better more academic book out there by Kelly so you may like to compare what each has to offer before buying either.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 4 Nov. 2008
This review is from: Attila The Hun: A Barbarian King and the Fall of Rome (Paperback)
Brilliant book. Very well-written and so exciting it's like you're being impaled yourself. John Man manages to bring light and clarity to a period of history when Europe was such a mess hardly anyone knew what was going on. Added to this, very little written documentation survives so much must be conjectured - despite this, Man roots out what he can, highlighting the truly salient elements. He also manages to explain fantastically complicated geo-political manoevres with wit and concision.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Archery on Horseback, 21 Dec. 2013
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This review is from: Attila The Hun: A Barbarian King and the Fall of Rome (Paperback)
Well researched and an entertaining read, but I did not like it as much as John Man's Xanadu - Marco Polo and Europe's Discovery of the East. Of special interest for those who would like to know about the Huns and the way they waged war as skilled archers on horseback.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An exiting tour with Atilla the Hun, 6 Jan. 2013
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JCT Richards (Northallerton, North Yorkshire) - See all my reviews
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An excellent book that reads more like and adventure story than actual fact. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in the history of this adventurer who earned his place in the history of civilisation and war.
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Attila The Hun: A Barbarian King and the Fall of Rome
Attila The Hun: A Barbarian King and the Fall of Rome by John Man (Paperback - 1 Mar. 2006)
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