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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Henry Mortan Stanley's quest for fame
A fascinating insight into early exploration within Africa. Martin's portrayal of Stanley through immense research is both captivating and enthralling. Wriiten at a pace which allows you to understand the indivduals involved and the problems they encountered whilst never diminshing in excitement. My highest accolade is that books on these subjects have tendancy to throw...
Published on 12 Oct. 2004 by A D Cutmore

versus
0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars apologies to earlier complaint
apologies for my earlier email about into africa being a library book - i did not read the fine print and missed this info:
i would not have bought it even at one cent a copy - yellowed and old and just not a good feel about the book
britta dwyer
Published on 28 April 2013 by britta c. dwyer


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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Henry Mortan Stanley's quest for fame, 12 Oct. 2004
This review is from: Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone (Paperback)
A fascinating insight into early exploration within Africa. Martin's portrayal of Stanley through immense research is both captivating and enthralling. Wriiten at a pace which allows you to understand the indivduals involved and the problems they encountered whilst never diminshing in excitement. My highest accolade is that books on these subjects have tendancy to throw fact after fact at you which make the book hard work. Ths is in essence a story of Stanley's life and personally I found it far easier to assimilate facts that were enjoyable to read. Many thanks to Martin for writing such a fantastic book about a truly epic journey.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good 19th Century Narrative History, 17 Jan. 2008
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This review is from: Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone (Paperback)
Into Africa tells the story of the events leading up to the famous meeting of Stanley and Livingstone in Africa in 1871. The book is well-written and conveys a good sense into what life was like on the African expeditions undertaken by explorers during the Victorian era. More importantly, the story is told in the context of the major events and developments that were happening in the world at or around that time. While I would not characterise this as "unputdownable", it moves along well and is written in a clear and reader-friendly style. On the negative side, the recounting of the day-to-day tribulations involved in an African expedition became a bit tedious after a while, and in my view the story (at no fault of the author) lacked real suspense until the days immediately leading up to the Stanley-Livingstone meeting. Another not insignificant shortcoming is the lack of any good maps in the book. The story is filled with references to villages, rivers, lakes, valleys, etc. yet there is only one map in the book (Livingstone's own map drawn at the time) which is not clear nor comprehensive. Overall, a well-written narrative history that is entertaining and worth reading.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars New Life Put Into An Old Story - Gripping!, 19 Feb. 2008
By 
P. Butler "Book Muncher" (Sheffield, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone (Paperback)
This is a story I have heard about all my life, and didn't think there was anything new to say about it. My mistake! The very clever author of this book has made the story fresh and current. He has done this by relating the lives of Livingston and Stanley from birth, and leading up to their famious first meeting.

The author also gives a very good impression of British society in the mid 19th century. For example, I was astonished at what a big event Livingston's funeral was. Putting it in a modern context, it was on a par with the funeral of Princess Diana. I have tried to read similar books in the past, but they have been too dry. However, 'Into Africa' was written in a very engaging way, and I would recommend it to anyone.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Problem With Presumption, 21 May 2003
By 
Bruce Loveitt (Ogdensburg, NY USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Here's what I knew (or thought I knew) before I read this book: David Livingstone was a missionary who, after many years of trying, converted almost no Africans to Christianity. He got sidetracked into trying his luck at exploration...and didn't have much luck. He mainly wandered around, not accomplishing much. Henry Morton Stanley went looking for Livingstone as a newspaper "publicity stunt." He had a lot of money behind him and found Livingstone without too much trouble. Later on in life he went back to Africa and debased himself by working for the notorious King Leopold of Belgium, helping to set up the infamous slave-labor colony in the Congo. He was, even before he went to the Congo, a cruel racist. Although maybe I shouldn't admit to my ignorance, that's pretty much what I "knew." Some of the above turned out to be true, some of it didn't, as I discovered after reading this book. It is true Livingstone didn't have much luck with conversions, even though he spent a good portion of the last 30 years of his life in Africa. He was, however, a better explorer than I realized. He was the first white man to walk across Africa, doing so from east to west. From 1841-1851 he explored the deserts, rivers and lakes of Southern Africa. From 1858-1863 he explored the Zambezi river and the area to the north of the river. It is true that he didn't accomplish two of the main goals he had set for himself. He hoped, by his explorations, to open up the African interior to economic development which would eliminate the slave trade. This didn't happen during his lifetime. He even compromised his principles and accepted food and hospitality from Arab slave traders as his second goal became his primary goal, and even an obsession- to find (or to confirm or disprove what previous explorers thought to be) the source of the Nile. He was about 600 miles too far to the south, and never found what he was looking for. Indeed, after being found by Stanley, Livingstone remained in Africa and died in pursuit of his obsession. Despite these failures, Livingstone did map quite a bit of Africa and measured the height of, and gave the English name to, Victoria Falls. Stanley, while undoubtedly a racist and clearly cruel- he beat his porters for little or no reason- did not have an easy time working his way to Livingstone. As Mr. Dugard makes clear, Stanley was relentless in making his way through jungle, swamp and across the savannah, having to deal with crocodiles, lions, hyenas, and tsetse flies along the way. He survived bouts of malaria and dysentery, encounters with cannibals, an attempted rebellion by his men, and porters running off with essential supplies. He also wound up in the middle of a war between Arab slave traders and various African tribes. He was genuinely fond of Livingstone and didn't just stick around to utter the famous sound-bite, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?" He spent five months with Livingstone, bringing essential supplies so that Livingstone could go on with his explorations. Stanley later, in 1874, returned to Africa and circumnavigated both Lake Victoria and Lake Tanganyika and followed the Congo river all the way to the Atlantic. These were remarkable achievements. Do they absolve Stanley of the sin of helping to establish Leopold's nightmarish Belgian Congo? No they don't....but they were still remarkable achievements. This book works well as an adventure story, but it is more than that. The author didn't just look at the books that Stanley and Livingstone wrote for public consumption. He also looked at the private journals of the two men. Thus, we are privy to their most inner thoughts and disappointments. Livingstone was guilty about not having spent more time at home in England with his wife and children. (His wife was so lonely she came to Africa to join him in 1861. She died of malaria in 1862.) He also, however, despite his reputation as a "saintlike" missionary, was very sexually active with African women. He himself estimated that he had enjoyed the favors of 300 natives. Stanley was the result of a liaison between his prostitute mother and one of her customers. He was dumped in a workhouse by uncaring relatives and was sexually abused by his fellow inmates. His journals, unsurprisingly, show a man wracked by insecurity and depression, warding off thoughts of suicide by keeping himself constantly busy. Mr. Dugard speculates that part of the appeal for Stanley in finding Livingstone (and his affection for Livingstone once they met) was his desperate need for a father figure. (Livingstone was about 30 years older than Stanley.) Considering Stanley's upbringing, this speculation does not seem far-fetched. One problem this otherwise fine book does have is that it suffers from a lack of maps. The only map in the book is printed on the inside cover. It is ok but not very detailed, and it is awkward to get to while you are trying to keep your place as you read. As most of the chapters go into considerable depth concerning where Stanley and Livingstone are at any particular moment, it would have been much better to have more maps scattered throughout the book. In any event, after reading this excellent combination of adventure tale/ dual biography, I feel a little less ignorant than before. Not a bad thing!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Hard read but a good read, 16 July 2011
This review is from: Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone (Paperback)
This book was our Book Club Choice for June 2011. I was daunted by it I must admit and rightly so. I found it quite dull and very very steady throughout. BUT...
having finished it I feel like I do when I come away from a grueling gym session - like I couldn't be bothered to do it but with a little bit of effort and perseverance I am glad I did it.
I decided to make this read even harder for myself by also reading alongside it the Tim Butcher Blood River. I then to fill in the years in between the 2 went on line and looked at King Leopold 2nd of Belgium so had at the end of it a great knowledge of the Congo. Putting it all together I feel very proud of myself for doing this. Into Africa was as epic a read as it was an adventure for all those involved.
If you fancy having a go at it I really do recommend going the whole hog and reading all I have read on the subject as I have left the Congo and Livingstone and Stanley with a feeling of great respect for these early explorers and a pang of guilt and complete amazement at the way the Congolese were treated by us so called "civilized" people. Shame on the British Empire and Europe during this hideous period in history.
I made it to the end, so can you!
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5.0 out of 5 stars An Engrossing Book, 24 Nov. 2013
This review is from: Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone (Paperback)
This book , written by Martin Dugard, retells the legendary story of Livingstone and Stanley .

The book contains 316 pages ( with the addition of extra pages of acknowledgements and notes to follow).I have now read this particular book twice and I can report that I found it to be engrossing and exhilarating .

The various trials and tribulations of both men are given to us in great detail ( in relation to their overall lives and personal histories and also to their experiences within Africa itself) .The book also takes a 'warts'n'all' approach when describing the personalities and behaviour of these two men .I felt that I was really getting to know what made each man tick the more that I progressed further into the story.

This book seems to be very comprehensive and it's account is told in a gripping fashion that avoids ever being either overly sentimental or (on the other extreme) boringly academic. In summary this book is a riveting and exciting work which is also very educational .
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4.0 out of 5 stars It's a story worth more than just it's famous line, 18 Jun. 2012
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This review is from: Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone (Paperback)
I have come to enjoy books on the Age Discovery and exploration and this book doesn't disappoint. Except for the famous line supposedly uttered by Stanley upon finally reaching Dr. Livingstone, I did not know much about this story. However, Martin Dugard's book is a fascinating look into the lives of these two men and their adventures on the African continent. He doesn't gloss over their foibles, but gives us good researched account of just who these men were and what they were thinking. I loved that he begins by showing us how they came to cross paths in the first place. In 1866, as Linvingstone waited for a boat to take him back to Africa, Dugard writes, "one month later, and halfway around the world, Henry Morton Stanley unknowingly began a journey towards David Lingstone." It's as if they were destined to meet. But it's also a story of how the search for the source of the Nile became so entrenched in the imaginations of the people of Victorian England. A great read and highly recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Marvelous Adventure Story, 22 Jan. 2013
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This review is from: Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone (Paperback)
I have to say I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I felt it was well researched & written & had a way of immersing you into the jungle with its subject matter, the equally formidable Livingston & Stanley.
The book really does catapult you not only to a hostile environment but a completely different era and I found it fascinating to read of times gone by.
I enjoy reading of times gone by but this is a story to rival any great works of fiction. Real life really is more marvelous & anyone who has not read this story should put it on their bucket list.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A real-life adventure! Fascinating story of the behind-the-scene forces ..., 14 July 2014
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This review is from: Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone (Paperback)
A real-life adventure! Fascinating story of the behind-the-scene forces which propelled Livingstone from the UK and Stanley from the US into their memorable rendezvous in Central Africa. I think the story could have benefitted from a map or two which traced their paths, and matched their journeys with today's Africa.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Into Africa, 3 July 2009
By 
A. M. Steiner "Angelique" (Forest Hill NSW Australia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone (Paperback)
Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone
I found that 'Into Africa' was an interesting read but found it hard to follow because of the continual change in dates which did not appear to follow on from each other. I realise this is a 'Biography' of two men but found the insertion of other explorers lacking meaning, perhaps maps inserted within the pages so as to help with the journeys taken.
I can certainly encourage those interested in African exploration to go ahead and purchase the book, they shan't be disapointed with the read and the search for knowledge. Did Stanely say "Dr Livingstone I presume?" I'd like to imagine he did but unfortunately there is no such record of such, perhaps this page was absconded by those wishing to alienate others perhaps it is just a later phrase added by Stanley to prove he had indeed found the master.
Alas, we shall never know.
Please read and enjoy and draw your own conclusion.
Angelique
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Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone
Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone by Martin Dugard (Paperback - 1 May 2004)
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