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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Powerful, Emotional and Enthralling
As a portrayal of one of the most prolific disasters of modern naval history, Moore successfully recreates the feelings of the time, and projects this to the reader through a variety of views and perspectives. What this results in is a powerful description of the event from a human prespective, which allows the reader to determine their own conclusions to the tragedy...
Published on 24 Jan 2003 by Mr Richard James Thompson

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A worthy read for non-specialists
Robert Moore has done a capable job with this retelling of the gripping and tragic tale of K-141's end. He has done a decent job of gathering facts, both common and obscure, and pulling them together. For a non-specialist in this area, this book is a fine beginning in coming to grips with the events, their causes, and their consequences. Unfortunately for me, I have more...
Published on 14 Feb 2004 by tranq45


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A worthy read for non-specialists, 14 Feb 2004
By 
tranq45 (from inside your closet of nightmares.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Time To Die: The Kursk Disaster (Paperback)
Robert Moore has done a capable job with this retelling of the gripping and tragic tale of K-141's end. He has done a decent job of gathering facts, both common and obscure, and pulling them together. For a non-specialist in this area, this book is a fine beginning in coming to grips with the events, their causes, and their consequences. Unfortunately for me, I have more than a little experience in the area, and I was left wanting much more than I found. Moore goes over all the obligatory points, and gives an adequate, if somewhat limited, explanation of the salient facts. His explanations are short on depth though, and are even occasionally trite. His repeated return to the sheer size of the KURSK, for instance, begins to pall after the forth or fifth repetition, and he is repetitive in other areas as well. What I really found myself wanting was more on the internal manoeuvrings of the Russian Federation government and armed services, more on the word games and spin presented to the world, more on the international implications resulting from the attempts to place an external blame on the whole incident, and more on the salvage efforts, especially after the crew was found to be dead. The raising of the KURSK alone was a monumental achievement, worthy of a book in it's own right, as are the geo-political implications of the event. The bare facts of the sinking, and the tragedy unfolding within the K-141 are only sufficient to fill part of the story, and Moore neglects them for significant portions of the book, loosing the sense of immediacy. Moore does bring to light much that was not widely known before, especially in regards to the advanced state of decay of the Russian Federation Navy, but never fully explores their causes and implications. Budget disasters, manpower shortages, and official myopia were likewise insufficiently explored. The book never really develops the sense of urgency that this story really deserves.
Moore has found and gathered a worthy collection of facts, information, and anecdotes, but he ultimately fails to produce a gripping tale. What he does deliver, though, is enough: A story of courage, pride, neglect, suspicion, miscommunication, parochialism, and incompetence. If it were not for the lives lost, it would be sadly amusing. Instead, it's heartbreaking. Those were good men aboard the K-141, better by far than their leaders deserved: That much, Moore makes abundantly clear.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Powerful, Emotional and Enthralling, 24 Jan 2003
As a portrayal of one of the most prolific disasters of modern naval history, Moore successfully recreates the feelings of the time, and projects this to the reader through a variety of views and perspectives. What this results in is a powerful description of the event from a human prespective, which allows the reader to determine their own conclusions to the tragedy. Once started it is impossible to put down, and draws you into the life of submariners in modern day Russia, describing in detail events that occurred both before, during and after the sinking. A must read book discussed from an open minded author.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shocking incompetence, 3 Jan 2007
By 
Colin Ellis "Bookworm" (West Sussex) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Time To Die: The Kursk Disaster (Paperback)
Not on behalf of the author but rather within the systems in Russia that existed at the time of the disaster - people more worried about their jobs that the lives of the 118 men onboard the Kursk. A superb read, though harrowing in places, it reflects well the nature of those who live under the sea serving within the Submarine fleets of the worlds navies
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Harrowing, 5 Oct 2003
This review is from: Time To Die: The Kursk Disaster (Paperback)
When I read this book, I couldn't believe the sheer contempt and disregard for life that some of the hierarchy in the Russian government showed. Lying at the bottom of the Barents were 23 men waiting to be rescued. The Russian Navy didn't have the technology to save them, but the British and Norweigan Navies (along with a private deep sea saturation diving team) did and were on hand ready and waiting, only beauracrats in Moscow didn't want western Navies to see what there submarine looked like. It didn't matter that there may be men alive waiting to be rescued.
Some people showed immense courage, from the Northern Fleet captains who tried to rescue the sailors even though they were putting their own lives at risk, to the Admiral of the Northern Fleet who went against his governments wishes and let western nations in to help. But all was in vain, and all 118 men who were on board the Kursk were to lose their lives.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Gripping Tale, 31 Aug 2002
By 
May Wong (New York, NY United States) - See all my reviews
A well researched and sensitive account of both the disaster and the lives involved - bringing to life the humanity behind the disaster, re-enacting the horror of what might have been for those trapped, awaiting death, as well as how it was for those left behind. A gripping read - couldn't put it down, and even under the bright sunshine in the south of France, tears were streaming down my face as the tale of desperation was re-told in both a sensitive and restrained emotional manner. A gripping read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars good one to read, captivating - read it tin one day, 21 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Time To Die: The Kursk Disaster (Paperback)
was a good read. intense. wonder where the guy got all that information from.
the author actualy ahs spent quite a long time in Russia working as a reporter
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3.0 out of 5 stars A mediocre presentation of an unbelievable event, 19 Mar 2012
By 
M. Hamann "Markus" (Finland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Time To Die: The Kursk Disaster (Paperback)
I doubt readers are unfamiliar with the events of the Kursk. I was interested in reading a book covering the details of those events. This book was written by a journalist who tried too hard to breathe excitement and drama into the story--the attempt seemed strained to me. The facts are essentially there; however, I really disliked Moore's writing style. I have only read this book about the Kursk, so I cannot recommend another book. While I will not re-read this book, I would only recommend it half-heartedly: if you are on a cruise and the ship has a library, go ahead and read it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent book, 29 Dec 2008
This review is from: Time To Die: The Kursk Disaster (Paperback)
A Time to Die is an excellent book. It is highly readable but still reasonably detailed and provides insight into the worlds of naval warfare and maritime salvage. Trang45's criticisms are justified- the book is quite superficial in places and certainly raises more questions than it answers. However, the book is great for non specialists and I would consider it good value
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5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping and Very Moving., 17 Nov 2007
By 
P. Carter - See all my reviews
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A fantastic read. I couldn't put the book down. It was so moving it brought tears to my eyes.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A chilling account from a superb author, 26 Jan 2004
Nothing less than a fine piece of wriiting and documented evidence. In depth detail allows your mind to imagine what those poor sub-mariners must have gone through.
A fantasic read which will keep you up well after your bed time!
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Time To Die: The Kursk Disaster
Time To Die: The Kursk Disaster by Robert Moore (Paperback - 1 July 2003)
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