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40 of 43 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Highly implausible - hugely enjoyable
The review title may seem a contradiction but the sheer charisma of Lee Child's writing and characterisation allows the reader to wallow in the faintly absurd and come out the other side wishing that the book was twice the length. Let me explain.
Firstly, Jack Reacher is, was rather, a military policeman. At the risk of offending military police out there, who do a...
Published on 6 May 2003 by 3PARA

versus
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as other in the series...
I've read all the Reacher series of books with the exception of Bad Luck and Trouble and i have to say the Echo Burning was my least favourite. I just couldn't warm to the characters and the story failed to grab my attention the way the others in the series did. That said its not a bad read and if you've read the other books in the series you will probably enjoy this...
Published on 11 April 2007 by Mr. N. Bailie


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40 of 43 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Highly implausible - hugely enjoyable, 6 May 2003
By 
3PARA (Brisbane, Australia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Echo Burning: (Jack Reacher 5) (Paperback)
The review title may seem a contradiction but the sheer charisma of Lee Child's writing and characterisation allows the reader to wallow in the faintly absurd and come out the other side wishing that the book was twice the length. Let me explain.
Firstly, Jack Reacher is, was rather, a military policeman. At the risk of offending military police out there, who do a difficult and often dangerous job, theirs is not the world of CSI or Law and Order Special Homicide squads. 90% of their weeks work involves petty theft, drunk squaddies and mindless violence. Jack Reacher, whilst being the hardest man in the U.S. and the best shot, also manages to have the sort of investigative techinique that can only mean he was the illegitimate love-child of Hercule Poirot and Angela Lansbury.
Let me promise you, he didnt learn that in the M.P.'s.
The thing is though, and this is where Child is on an absolute winner....it doesnt matter. We WANT Reacher to be that ridiculously good, we need him to be that good, because in this day and age, if ever, we need our heroes to be bigger and better than anything that life can throw at them.
These books roll along at an incredible pace leaving the reader desperate to see what happens on the next page but reluctant to turn it as that brings us one step closer to the end.
A trimuphant return for Child and Reacher.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as other in the series..., 11 April 2007
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This review is from: Echo Burning: (Jack Reacher 5) (Paperback)
I've read all the Reacher series of books with the exception of Bad Luck and Trouble and i have to say the Echo Burning was my least favourite. I just couldn't warm to the characters and the story failed to grab my attention the way the others in the series did. That said its not a bad read and if you've read the other books in the series you will probably enjoy this one too.

If you've not read any of the Reacher series don't start with this book, try the 1st in the series or One Shot - which is my fav :)
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars LEE CHILD ONCE AGAIN PROVES WHAT A TALENTED WRITER HE IS!!!, 29 July 2001
By A Customer
Last year, when I read RUNNING BLIND, I gave it a somewhat scathing review, stating that Lee Child hadn't produce a really exciting book since THE KILLING FLOOR, promising myself that I'll never buy another "Jack Reacher" novel in hardback for as long as I lived. As far as I was concerned, Mr. Child had three strikes against him and had struck out with me as a fan. Well, I broke the promise to myself with the publication of ECHO BURNING, and I'm glad I did. This novel turned out to be a winner in every sense of the word and represents the sheer craftsmanship that Lee Child is capable of bringing to his work. In his newest book, Jack Reacher once again returns and finds himself caught up in a game of lies, abuse and murder. While hitchhiking out of Lubbock, Texas in an attempt to escape the wrath of the law, he's picked up by Carmen Greer, a beautiful, married Latino woman who's driving a luxurious white Cadillac. Mrs. Greer is looking for someone to kill her abusive husband, Sloop, who's due to get out of prison, and she thinks that Reacher would be the perfect person to take care of her little problem. Since Reacher doesn't consider himself to be a cold-blooded killer, he politely refuses her kind offer. He does, however, agree to go back to the ranch where she and her daughter, Ellie, live with Sloop's family and to act as a protector for her. This leads to our hero finding himself in the middle of a really large domestic dispute. Except for Carmen and Ellie, nobody in the Greer family likes having his presence at the ranch, and they attempt to do everything within their power to force him to leave. When Sloop gets out of jail and returns home, only to be murdered on the night of his arrival, it looks as though Carmen decided to take matters into her own hands. No one believes that she's innocent, except for Jack Reacher. As he attempts to hire a lawyer to represent Carmen, while at the same time trying to find out who the real killer is, he becomes the focus point of a three-person "hit" team and must stay alive long enough to get to the truth. ECHO BURNING is a taut, suspenseful thriller that displays the brilliant writing that Lee Child is capable of penning. He captures the heat and isolation of the Texas landscape perfectly, while giving us characters filled with either an outright meanness or a hidden evil. Though Reacher is able to read people, judging how good or bad they might be, he may have just met his match with the Greer family. There are so many lies and half-truths being told by, and about, the family that our main character won't know whom to believe, and neither will the reader. Is everything that Carmen Greer told Reacher a lie so that her husband could be murdered, or is the Greer family really a nest of vipers, ready to kill to protect its own? In this novel, Mr. Child touches the inner core of what evil really is and how it hides behind the masks of ordinary people. Jack Reacher, however, shines at his best as he decides to take on a whole town, if necessary, to do what he feels is right, meeting violence with violence, and handing out death to those who want a piece of him. ECHO BURNING is one tough novel that gives us a deeper look at the character of Jack Reacher and the essence of humanity in him that reaches out to help those who are being preyed upon. This is definitely the kind of person you want covering your back when the bad guys are closing in. For those of you who loved THE KILLING FLOOR, Mr. Child has written another book that equals, if not surpasses, the quality of his first novel. It's one I'm proud to highly recommend!
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clint, Bruce, and Mel are comparative sissies, 8 Dec 2002
By 
Joseph Haschka (Glendale, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Echo Burning: (Jack Reacher 5) (Paperback)
Each generation, I suppose, has its favorite fictional Tough Guys. For my parents, it may have been Bogart and The Duke. For me, they've been Clint, Bruce, and Mel on the Big Screen, and the literary British spy Quiller. However, in the past couple of years, Jack Reacher has arrived on the killing fields. And he's perhaps tougher, certainly smarter, than any who've gone before.
A former Army major assigned to the Military Police, Jack has been aimlessly roaming the United States through several novels, and attracting big trouble in each one. In ECHO BURNING, he's hitchhiked into sunburnt West Texas where he's given a ride by Carmen Greer, who's cruising the highways on the lookout for a Tough Guy. Carmen lives with her young daughter, Ellie, on an arid ranch with her hateful brother-in-law and mother-in-law while her husband, Sloop, serves time in a federal pen for tax evasion. According to the story Carmen spins, her spouse had been viciously beating her for years. Since Sloop is due to be released in forty-eight hours, Carmen expects the beatings to begin anew, especially since she was the one that ratted on Sloop to the IRS. Will Reacher kill him for her? No? Well, will he at least teach her how to shoot the dainty pistol she's purchased? (In the meantime, what's with that team of three professional assassins circling the ranch unbeknownst to all? Jack may discover his hands full.)
All those other Tough Guys I mentioned are smart, but not so much that they don't sporadically get beaten up and kicked silly by the Bad Guys. But not Reacher - nobody gets the drop on him. When the reader sees a violent confrontation looming, he almost feels sorry for the villains for the World of Hurt in which they'll soon find themselves. By his own admission, Jack's a hard man who likes cockroaches better than the men (and women) he's sometimes forced to exterminate.
Reacher is endlessly fascinating. Having gone from one Army post to another, first as an Army brat and then on his own as an MP officer, he's never known a permanent home. So, now he chooses to live as a near-vagrant, shunning commitment to material things and the occasional interesting woman. He travels only with testosterone and a toothbrush, buying cheap clothes to wear and discard as he goes. He's educated, intelligent and gentlemanly, but excruciatingly asocial (as opposed to antisocial, which he's not) and heroically ignorant about how a "normal" life - wife, house, mortgage, kids, dog, 9 to 5, and Lexus - is lived. This is a man whom all you single ladies out there would love the chance to improve. (Don't cave, Jack! Be a role model for the rest of us New Age men pining to be free!)
Hey, all you other Tough Guys of lore and legend, move aside and make room for a Real Man.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another great book by Lee Child, 10 April 2001
By A Customer
Keep a cool drink nearby as you read Echo Burning. Lee Child takes the reader into the unbearable heat of Echo, Texas as Jack Reacher tries to help a beautiful woman and her six-year-old daughter. Reacher has to sort through a web of truth, lies, and half-truths. Just when he has everything figured out, all the evidence points to different suspects and motives, and the closer Reacher gets to the truth the more his own life is at stake. Echo Burning is suspenseful from the first page until the spectacular climax. The biggest problem I had with the book was trying to put it down long enough to sleep.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clint, Bruce and Mel are comparative sissies, 10 Aug 2006
By 
Joseph Haschka (Glendale, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Echo Burning. (Paperback)
Each generation, I suppose, has its favorite fictional Tough Guys. For my parents, it may have been Bogart and The Duke. For me, they've been Clint, Bruce, and Mel on the Big Screen, and the literary British spy Quiller. However, in the past couple of years, Jack Reacher has arrived on the killing fields. And he's perhaps tougher, certainly smarter, than any who've gone before.

A former Army major assigned to the Military Police, Jack has been aimlessly roaming the United States through several novels, and attracting big trouble in each one. In ECHO BURNING, he's hitchhiked into sunburnt West Texas where he's given a ride by Carmen Greer, who's cruising the highways on the lookout for a Tough Guy. Carmen lives with her young daughter, Ellie, on an arid ranch with her hateful brother-in-law and mother-in-law while her husband, Sloop, serves time in a federal pen for tax evasion. According to the story Carmen spins, her spouse had been viciously beating her for years. Since Sloop is due to be released in forty-eight hours, Carmen expects the beatings to begin anew, especially since she was the one that ratted on Sloop to the IRS. Will Reacher kill him for her? No? Well, will he at least teach her how to shoot the dainty pistol she's purchased? (In the meantime, what's with that team of three professional assassins circling the ranch unbeknownst to all? Jack may discover his hands full.)

All those other Tough Guys I mentioned are smart, but not so much that they don't sporadically get beaten up and kicked silly by the Bad Guys. But not Reacher - nobody gets the drop on him. When the reader sees a violent confrontation looming, he almost feels sorry for the villains for the World of Hurt in which they'll soon find themselves. By his own admission, Jack's a hard man who likes cockroaches better than the men (and women) he's sometimes forced to exterminate.

Reacher is endlessly fascinating. Having gone from one Army post to another, first as an Army brat and then on his own as an MP officer, he's never known a permanent home. So, now he chooses to live as a near-vagrant, shunning commitment to material things and the occasional interesting woman. He travels only with testosterone and a toothbrush, buying cheap clothes to wear and discard as he goes. He's educated, intelligent and gentlemanly, but excruciatingly asocial (as opposed to antisocial, which he's not) and heroically ignorant about how a "normal" life - wife, house, mortgage, kids, dog, 9 to 5, and Lexus - is lived. This is a man whom all you single ladies out there would love the chance to improve. (Don't cave, Jack! Be a role model for the rest of us New Age men pining to be free!)

Hey, all you other Tough Guys of lore and legend, move aside and make room for a Real Man.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Echo The Dolphin, 17 Feb 2014
I started reading this book with the expectation that I'd quit after five pages or so. I started it for the sake of it, just to be able to say I tried. Then I could delete it from my Kindle and move on. That was the plan. And yet I didn't quit reading. I was hooked.

Echo Burning is number 5 in the bestselling Jack Reacher series, but I didn't know this at the time, and it doesn't matter anyway. The book works as a standalone. You don't need to know the backstory to enjoy it. And the story is a simple one: a woman and her daughter need to escape her abusive husband, and Jack Reacher is the man she ensnares to help her. That's the plot, broken down to its most simplistic form, yet it's larger than that, with a few subplots, some hired assassins, a few twists, and some okay dialogue in places (some wooden dialogue in others)--but that's the gist of it; at least at the beginning of the book. MAN SAVES WOMAN. However, as the story progresses, it grows into something bigger and more convoluted.

And although the twists (and especially the BIG REVEAL) were predictable, and occasionally clichéd, and despite the story seeming B-movie-ish and cheesy in some places, and even with the annoying repetition throughout the novel of key phrases and sentences, including the ubiquitous HE SAID NOTHING/SHE SAID NOTHING, I still found myself hooked all the way through, constantly wanting to read on. I finished this book in two days.

It read like a not-quite-as-good Robert Crais novel. It's basically a back-up Crais. That's how I felt when I read it. It was good, but not amazing. I liked it, and yet parts of the writing annoyed me (mainly all the repetition and overuse of certain sentence and scene structures, which made the writing seem lazy and the editor seem like an idiot), but even still--it's made me want to go back to the first in the series and read my way through all of the books in order, which is what I plan to do.

So the next few books I read are probably going to be Lee Child novels--unless I end up hating him, or hating all of his other novels, which is a possibility.

We'll see.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slow burning, 6 Oct 2011
By 
M. Ling (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Echo Burning: (Jack Reacher 5) (Paperback)
As with other Reacher stories, the author uses the environment to dictate the flow of the story. In this case unfortunately the environment seems to consist of not much at all, a lot of empty space that takes ages to get anywhere.
A complete change of pace for Reacher. Not necessarily a bad thing but I couldn't help but think 'just get on with it.'
When the action does pick up, about three quarters of the way through, it certainly rattles along with realisations and revelations coming thick and fast.
Exciting as this was I couldn't help but feel a little cheated, some of the conclusions seem a little contrived and obtuse and as a reader I felt a little out of the loop.
This was my second go round with this book, I thought I would give it another chance and I came to the same conclusion as last time.
The conclusion is great, but getting there is a real chore.
Not the best way to introduce yourself to Reacher, do yourself a favour, go for Die Trying, Tripwire or Persuader first.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Jack Reacher Page Turner, 8 Jun 2011
By 
Brett H "pentangle" (Brighton) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Very much what we have come to expect from Lee Child and Jack Reacher. Reacher is a drifter by choice and yet again drifts into a situation where his particular expertise in both deductive reasoning and peerless violence are just what is required, this time round in Texas.

This story begins with Reacher needing to leave town in a hurry and much to his surprise hitching a lift almost straight away with an attractive young woman. However, she wants more from him than just his conversation. In parallel with this story we get paragraphs interspersed concerning another small group of people who are clearly up to no good. Eventually the two stories predictably collide.

As always, Lee Child sets his scenes up very well so that the reader can clearly visualise the surroundings and picture the characters. The plot is fast moving if a little implausible and you almost feel sorry for those bad guys who elect to go head to head with our Jack - suspense does not enter into it as there is really only ever going to be one outcome in this situation and they certainly are on a hiding to nothing. However, none of this seriously detracts from a page turning and enjoyable read worthy of a Five Star rating in my opinion. This is only the second Reacher book I have read so another dozen or so to go, and a new one, The Affair, slated in for publication later this year. I believe the latter is a prequel to Killing Floor, the first Jack Reacher novel.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Strong story, compellingly told, 15 May 2006
This review is from: Echo Burning: (Jack Reacher 5) (Paperback)
Echo Burning features tough guy Jack Reacher at an isolated Texas ranch full of troubled relationships and mysterious history. The plot is pleasingly complex, revolving around the motivation and allegiances of a mysterious Mexican woman and the Texan family she's married into. The atmosphere, helped by a mighty storm constantly about to break, is thick with tension. All in all a thoroughly good read.

Downside: the climactic finale is not as satisfying as some Lee Child showdowns. But all in all this is a solid tale, well told.
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Echo Burning: (Jack Reacher 5)
Echo Burning: (Jack Reacher 5) by Lee Child (Paperback - 1 April 2002)
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