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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best New Fantasy Series Continues
The structure of the Malazan Book of the Fallen is a bit odd, though nicely original: Book 2 (Deadhouse Gates) follows Book 1 (Gardens of the Moon) but features largely different characters in a different situation. Book 3 (this one) is a direct sequel to Book 1, but takes place simultaneously alongside Book 2 and the ending sets up some events in Book 4 (House of...
Published on 15 Feb 2003 by A. Whitehead

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Equally fantastic and frustrating
Book 3 of the Malazan Book of the Fallen follows on directly from the first instalment, Gardens of the Moon. We're back on the continent of Genabackis, however the invading Malazan army led by Dujek has been outlawed by the Empress, and is forced to join forces with its recent enemies to face an even bigger threat - the fanatic army led by the Pannion Seer.

Of...
Published 20 months ago by Rowena


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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best New Fantasy Series Continues, 15 Feb 2003
By 
A. Whitehead "Werthead" (Colchester, Essex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Memories of Ice (Book 3 of The Malazan Book of the Fallen) (Mass Market Paperback)
The structure of the Malazan Book of the Fallen is a bit odd, though nicely original: Book 2 (Deadhouse Gates) follows Book 1 (Gardens of the Moon) but features largely different characters in a different situation. Book 3 (this one) is a direct sequel to Book 1, but takes place simultaneously alongside Book 2 and the ending sets up some events in Book 4 (House of Chains). Got all that straight? Good. Memories of Ice picks up from the end of Gardens of the Moon. The Malazan Empire has failed to capture the city of Darujhistant on the continent of Genabackis due to the defection of the Malazan 2nd Army. The 2nd Army has now joined forces with its former enemies, the Tiste Andii of Moon's Spawn and the mercenary army under the Warlord Caladan Brood, to take on the Pannion Domin, a horrific force for evil which has conquered the south of Genabackis and is now about to lay siege to the city of Capustan. Memories of Ice is, like its predecessors, complex and dense, following dozens of characters across several major plot strands. The undead T'lan Imass warrior Tool (one of the best fantasy characters of recent years) and the unlucky Malazan soldier Toc are reunited in a plotline which is often humourous before becoming tragic and, by the end, bittersweet. In another plot strand, a whole host of fascinating new characters help defend Capustan from the bloodiest siege ever described in a fantasy novel, whilst heroes from the first book are forced to work alongside their former enemies (and discovering, by and large, that they all get on well). Erikson's writing, previously excellent but occasionally disjointed, reaches a new level of maturity here as he deepens the characterisation and detail given to each cast member. The hectic, can't-pause-for-breath nature of the previous books is slightly lessened here, which is a good thing, at least until the highly charged and ultra-violent ending. Memories of Ice is the best book yet in the series, although it is by far the bloodiest (yes, even more so than Deadhouse Gates). Erikson has started tying up some of his plot threads, explaining some odd events from Book 1 and forcing you to constantly re-evaluate your opinions of characters. This time around, the characters feel more human and slightly less like chess pieces being moved around by the gods (ironic, given that the level of interference by the gods in the affairs of mortals is quite high in this book). Also the ongoing storylines that are going to carry this series through another seven books after this one are becoming more fleshed out, with rumours of events on other, distant continents setting up the next phase of the series (Book 5 will take place in a totally new land remote from the three contients visited so far). Memories of Ice is bloody, brutal and audacious. Robert Jordan and George R.R. Martin both have some serious competition to deal with.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Equally fantastic and frustrating, 30 Dec 2012
This review is from: Memories of Ice (Book 3 of The Malazan Book of the Fallen) (Mass Market Paperback)
Book 3 of the Malazan Book of the Fallen follows on directly from the first instalment, Gardens of the Moon. We're back on the continent of Genabackis, however the invading Malazan army led by Dujek has been outlawed by the Empress, and is forced to join forces with its recent enemies to face an even bigger threat - the fanatic army led by the Pannion Seer.

Of course, this being a Steven Erikson novel, the plot is vastly more complex than that. There are sub-plots within sub-plots, betrayals, twists, and an ever-expanding cast of new characters and gods.

After the stunning conclusion of Book 2 of the series, Deadhouse Gates, the start of this book seemed like something of an anti-climax, as I had to refresh my memory and remember the characters and plot from the first novel (which I had not been overly impressed with). However, once I got into it, I absolutely devoured the first two-thirds of this book. Brilliant, I thought, Erikson's finally got into his stride now, and I can see what all the fuss was about!

There are some truly original and disturbing ideas in this book. A cannibal army, the "children of the dead seed", a house so filled with swelling corpses that cracks begin to appear. The siege of Capustan is particularly gory and brutal - needless to say, I loved it!

Unfortunately, Erikson cannot keep up the pace, and things begin to flag as the various armies march to Coral for a final battle against the Pannions. There is too much introspection from the characters (which is not a substitute for good character-development), and it became confusing trying to remember things from the very start of the novel as the various plot-strands come together. The battle at Coral also seemed disappointing and contrived compared to what had gone before.

By the end of the book I was glad just to finish it, as the last third dragged so much I felt like I had been reading it for ever. I will continue with the series, as when it's good, it's amazing; but when it's bad... Hood, it's hard work!
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars High Energy writing of the highest order, 6 Mar 2002
A fabulous work, loaded with gods, violence, vengence, war, intrigue and surprisingly humour. Welcome back to the waking nightmare that is the world of the Malazan Empire. Wading through layers of deceit and intrigue, we find the Malazan army trudging South ostensibly to fight the Pannion Seer, a crazed religous zealot. But (and there is always a but) beneath this lies the machinations of a crippled god, along side it lies the hopes of other gods, weaved through it is the desire for absolution of entities long dead powered by an ancient curse. Along the way we meet new characters, Lady Envy been especially good, accompanied by the supreme Seguleh warriors (much to their disgust). Remarkably Erikson holds it all together, and even through such a maelstrom of events makes you care about the central characters, from major players like Whiskeyjack, right down to the common soldiers of the Bridge Burners.
In typical Erikson style the story comes together beautifully and violently at the end. I won't give the plot away, but it left me surprised and shocked; high energy writing of the highest order. The only fault I can find is that sometimes Erikson's passages can be a tad too opaque, who said what to whom and why is not always as clear as it could be. In other words sometimes teh sign posts could be a little larger. Five stars.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars rich and original, 28 Jan 2002
By A Customer
I stumbled across erikson on a trip to europe, eagerly looked for more on a return to US and found he had no American publisher! Ridiculous...I hope soon to be corrected. This, and its predecessors, are masterful works of a gritty, complex heroic fantasy. carefully plotted, well written and genuinely original (unlike most fantasies that steal from a mix of king arthur and tolkien, this is really something new and different). far better than the drowning morass of silly scenes and characters robert jordan's later books have been reduced to, the only comparable current writers are george rr martin and thomas harlan, and erikson is handily superior to both. heartily recommended
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Memories of Ice (Malazan Book of the Fallen), 30 May 2006
By 
Waqar (Halifax, West Yorkshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Memories of Ice (Book 3 of The Malazan Book of the Fallen) (Mass Market Paperback)
This is definitely the best of the three books so far.

It would be too difficult to describe the story line here, because it involves so many plots and sub-plots and shifting back and forth between them, but which all do come together, as always in Erikson's books, to a final climax.

As always, there is so much happening in Erikson's books that it is difficult to keep up, remember all the names and the different sub plot lines. For a book that comprises nearly 1,000 pages it was impressive that my attention was grabbed from the beginning and I found it extremely difficult to put the book down right up the end. It was fast paced, loads of action and very eventful through out. Many of the old characters from the first book (Gardens of the Moon) were back in this book.

You begin to learn so much more about characters like Quick Ben the mage, Whiskeyjack, you learn more about the significance of Paran, it was also great to find out a bit more about the enigmatic Amandor Rake. There are also a host of new characters. This is the first time that we are introduced to the sinister Bauchelain and Korbal Broach. They are the main characters in Erikson's short novellas. I did want to find out more about them, but I still don't understand how they progressed the story. I guess these characters and many others just shows how VAST and EPIC the Malazan series of books are. At times it is difficult to maintain an understanding of all that is happening.

This is definitely fantasy, but not like the usual `run of the mill' fantasy books out there. There is no mention of Elves, dwarves, etc. However, Erikson has created in the Malazan series a world that has never before been even hinted at in any of the fantasy books I have ever read before. The scale and scope of the stories so far seems vast in that they encompass not only people but also, different geographic cilivilisations and races that are non-human in nature. The books describe histories that are hundreds of thousands of years old, it includes Gods and ascendants. It is a world where the gods also play an active role and have their own motives and characteristics. It is a dark, very savage and barbaric world that no other fantasy novel I have ever read can has been able to match (perhaps Donaldson's Thomas Covenenant Chronicles). The story, the grand scale of events and world building are truly epic and this is one of the few times that no one would be able to argue with that statement.

Praise to Erikson for his amazing imagination that has enabled him to create such a vast world and in such detail. He is obviously getting better and I have noticed the improvements in the three books so far. He is obviously one of the handful of top fantasy writers out there (Tolkien the master, Martin, Jordan and Hobb). I hope that he continues to improve and that I (as well as all other readers) continue to read and enjoy his work.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great book!, 21 April 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Memories of Ice (Book 3 of The Malazan Book of the Fallen) (Mass Market Paperback)
I enjoyed this book so much I was compelled to write my first review ever! I bought the first book in this series (Gardens of the Moon) on the strength of a recommendation from Amazon and was bowled over by the the strength of the plot and characters. The world Steven Erikson creates is just jammed full of interesting ideas and carefully explored, realistic people. This book, the third in the series, is if anything better than the ones before it. I very much a fan of science fiction and fantasy but have become slightly jaded of late. This series has done a deal to renew my faith in the genre.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A truly engaging read., 15 Jan 2006
By 
K. Elliott (Wiltshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Memories of Ice (Book 3 of The Malazan Book of the Fallen) (Mass Market Paperback)
I have been reading Sci_FI and Fantasy books for many years and have yet to come across a modern writer who matches the skill of Steven Erikson. His plots are complex and absorbing but still well paced and despite the size of his books the action and progression of the many themes are developed so quickly excessive concentration is essential. Erikson brings a human touch to the horrific slaughter and terrible loss that is too often ignored altogether in Sci-Fi novels, where the massacre of an opposing army seems to have no effect on the humanity or terrific good humour of the victors. Eriksons battles leaves those involved physically exhausted and with the reader, emotionally numb. His ideas of magic and the pantheon are unique and his grounding as an anthrpologist pays dividends as the schisms between allied yet completely seperate human societies and the many other diverse races unfold.

His true genius for me is his characterisation. Complex certainly and of all the books i've read possibly the most realistically human. Moments of unsurpassed heroism collide with the barbaric bestial depths of human behaviour and the characters rarely act in a transparant fashion, allowing for realistic seeming divisions and human reactions while even the seemingly evil characters have hidden depths. And while heroic feats are achieved it is not usually for the altruistic ideals of the 'good' charcters but, as in the real world due to a chaotic combnation of factors. As is noted in this book, when fighting an oppressive empire, liberation for the commonality might well result, but is not the goal.

I also enjoy how throughout the series you think you can see that one side or person is 'bad' but are revealed to be no different or even better that percieved before, as in the case of the Malazan Empire. In the first book you are led to believe it is a negative force for all, no benefits and that certain charcters are determined to see its end when the truth is far more historical real, with arguments able to bemade on both sides and how characters are developed as they see this as well.

In conclusion Erikson weaves a fascinating tale with deeply moving themes and a brutal realsim and fatalism, a dark and complex and unique series of novels from a genius and master of detail.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Back on track, 22 Nov 2002
By 
Chris Evans "Enzuigiri" (Hampshire, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Memories of Ice (Book 3 of The Malazan Book of the Fallen) (Mass Market Paperback)
I approached Gardens of the Moon with caution. Big, thick book on the shelf..author I hadnt heard of...but I was more than pleasantly suprise. Erickson is an extremely clever author and like Tolkien has a strong attention to detail...you cant pick this up whenever, it isnt fluffy fiction..no, these books require thought and concentration but they are very rewarding. The second book Deadhouse Gates was much slower for me and at times I found quite tiresome so I had preconceptions about this third offering "Memories of Ice" and I am pleased to say that I was very, very wrong. Picking up from the pace of the first book, this is a tale of sorcery, human endeavour, ancient suffering, gods past and present and not a little humour as well. For me this is fantasy fiction at its best, absorbing and at the same time thought provoking. I would recommend fans of Guy Gavriel Kay,David Gemmell and the others to get involved with this series straight away; you will not be disappointed. With the fourth book due to be released soon I think this series of books will soon be up there on the "classic" shelf.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I have run aground!, 31 Jan 2012
This review is from: Memories of Ice (Book 3 of The Malazan Book of the Fallen) (Mass Market Paperback)
No doubt, Steven Erikson has created an AWE-INSPIRING piece of fantasy with his Malazan series and it will take me many years to be able to read, digest and understand it. However, I am still suffering from dashed expectations. And, I have to say, it is ME who is in the wrong here. Erikson stated clearly in the preface of 'Gardens of the Moon' that he shunned conventions. I just didn't realise at the time of starting this series just how much!

For a start the books are not page-turners in my eyes. Also, it is not epic fantasy. It is, in fact, a vast series of vignettes that may or may not link together to form a coherent whole. The themes are intimate and painful and difficult to confront.

I know this might sound strange but I think the biggest mistake Erikson made was not taking charge of what the book covers were going to be, because they are completely conventional epic fantasy fare. The contents of these books is ANYTHING BUT! The covers should be much much more intimate, strange, dream-like and contemplative.

Of course, this is all just my opinion. Take it or leave it, but this reader, after 2000 pages of the Malazan Book of the Fallen, has had to shelve it for the time being. I need a break!!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars even better than GOTM, 15 Jun 2007
By 
dolfanuk (Wigan, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Memories of Ice (Book 3 of The Malazan Book of the Fallen) (Mass Market Paperback)
ok let me start by saying that this is what i thought deadhouse gates would be, a straight continuation from GOTM. so i had to wait an extra book, so what. this book is huge and to match that the stakes are equally huge.

several characters return some of whom i never thought i'd see again, and we have some great new characters, including gruntle, itkovian and lady envy. the best though is probably captain paran, and i know alot of you will say that he isn't a new character that he is a returning charachter but beleive me when i say he is so different and prominent that he might as well be a new character.

again i gotta say the ending really hits home hard, you'll see what i mean. also more is revealed about ascendants and the rolls they play not to mention the crippled god features more prominently.

and again the sorcery and battles are second to none. i gotta say one scene where a wizard transports the contents of a waterskin into the lungs of an enemy mage is just genius on the part of the author.

again another brilliant book and i hope the remaining books in the series are released with as mcu hhaste as is humanly possible.
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Memories of Ice (Book 3 of The Malazan Book of the Fallen)
Memories of Ice (Book 3 of The Malazan Book of the Fallen) by Steven Erikson (Mass Market Paperback - 1 Oct 2002)
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