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5.0 out of 5 stars Not the best of the trilogy, but a good ending for it.
I actually wanted to give it 4 1/2 stars, but they don't allow that. 4 stars is too low. I'll try not to make this too long, because then hardly anyone will read this. The first SW book I read was the Paradise Snare, the first in this trilogy (last year). I insist on reading all the books in order (it took me forever to find this one). I have always had a rather high...
Published on 27 Jun 1998

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Kessel Run a joke!
Crispin has a good ear for dialogue, and she seems to know Han pretty well. It's nice to see on this forum so many people who love Han as much as I do. He was always my favorite character in the Trilogy (Luke tended to strike me a bit like Kibbick.) Crispin also explains, in easy-to-understand terms, why Han would *NEVER* *MARRY* *LEIA* (one of my pet peeves about the...
Published on 4 Feb 1999


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3.0 out of 5 stars Kessel Run a joke!, 4 Feb 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Star Wars: The Han Solo Trilogy - Rebel Dawn: Rebel Dawn Book 3 (Mass Market Paperback)
Crispin has a good ear for dialogue, and she seems to know Han pretty well. It's nice to see on this forum so many people who love Han as much as I do. He was always my favorite character in the Trilogy (Luke tended to strike me a bit like Kibbick.) Crispin also explains, in easy-to-understand terms, why Han would *NEVER* *MARRY* *LEIA* (one of my pet peeves about the later novels.) There are a few things in this trilogy I just can't believe, though. I can't accept that Han's childhood was a word by word copy of "Oliver Twist." I can't imagine Han as a spandex-clad magician's assistant. I can't accept that these are all the same: the 12 parsec Kessel Run (I've got my doubts that this one even *existed*) ,the Run with the kids on board ,the time Han dumped Jabba's spice ,the last Run before the Trilogy (about 5 minutes before, according to Crispin) 'Course, it could be that Crispin doesn't believe it either, but is just using this as a way to tell all these Kessel Run stories without sounding repetitive. My last gripe is that Han got the Falcon too late, for Lucas' sake! He seemed WAY too attatched to it in the movies to have only had it for a few years! Also I was hoping to see more of it... the Falcon was just too cool in the movies to be almost totally left out like this! Speaking of things being left out, Han seems to be conspicuously absent in Rebel Dawn... sure, those books have already been written, but Crispin, there's more to writing a good story than saying "see Han Solo's Revenge" or what-not. As for Bria... she started out as a good person but evolved into a double-crossing, amoral person who I wasn't all *that* bummed out to see die. It also explains why Han didn't want to get into the Rebellion. Oh, and about that final attack on Ylesia... why, why, WHY did Crispin have to take Han and Lando absolutely literally in ESB?! It was obvious to me that Lando's "after what you pulled" was either a joke or referred to something small, that Lando could just laugh off. By the end of Rebel Dawn Lando sounds like he could kill Han... and a year or so later he hardly cares about it?! But things like this aside, the Han Solo Trilogy is still way above other SW books. I'll always remember what Han thought when he first laid eyes on the Falcon... (now if only we could have SEEN some of that fulfilled! Han's adventures with the Falcon shoulda been the main point of the whole book trilogy! But I digress...) Anyway, it's worth reading. Just don't take it literally, and feel free to imagine what happened in between times. For the Han Fans Report, I'm Sytel Ironside.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Not the best of the trilogy, but a good ending for it., 27 Jun 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Star Wars: The Han Solo Trilogy - Rebel Dawn: Rebel Dawn Book 3 (Mass Market Paperback)
I actually wanted to give it 4 1/2 stars, but they don't allow that. 4 stars is too low. I'll try not to make this too long, because then hardly anyone will read this. The first SW book I read was the Paradise Snare, the first in this trilogy (last year). I insist on reading all the books in order (it took me forever to find this one). I have always had a rather high reading level for my age (I am 13 now.), so I found these books rather easy to read; I have bought and read 26 SW books. OK, enough of that. A.C. Crispin has a wonderful talent for making books like-able (unless you can't stand any romance). I have commented on her other books in this trilogy. These books are a refreshing break from all this jedi-ish stuff that always comes into the rest of the books, and there isn't any of this totally incomprehensible technical jargon. Plus, the cover art is cool, as it is on most SW books.
If you'll notice, on page 43 of "The Paradise Snare", paragraph 6, it talks about how Han asked the 2 questions of the Senator that had been "insightful and intelligent enough to make the senator really notice him. After class was over, Bell Iblis had stopped Han, shaken his hand, and asked his name. Han had glanced around quickly, seeing that nobody else was within earshot, and proudly told the Senator his real name. It had felt great to be able to do that..." Ms. Crispin's trilogy is, so far, in my opinion, the best one. If you liked this trilogy, I recommend "The Truce at Bakura". OK, so this did turn out kind of long. Sorry 'bout that.
May God bless you. (I'm not going to say "may the force be with you" because in actuallity, there is no force, there's God.) END
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5.0 out of 5 stars Questions Answered, 11 May 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Star Wars: The Han Solo Trilogy - Rebel Dawn: Rebel Dawn Book 3 (Mass Market Paperback)
Great book! I couldn't put it down. It made me want to watch the movie again.
Now we know what Han was referring to when he said in Empire about Lando, "Well that was a long time ago. I'm sure he must've forgotten about that."
We also find out how Han won the Falcon "fair and square."
And how he made the Kessel Run in less than 12 parsecs. And he did that hauling a bunch of kids!
And exactly why Jabba was angry at Han.
It was interesting to see other characters making cameo appearances, or at least being talked about them (e.g., Mon Mothma and Leia)
AC also goes beyond explaining what happened to Han Solo for the movies. She also explained events for the grahpic novel "Dark Empire". She tells the story between Salla and Han. As well as Shug Ninx, ZeeZee, and Han's old place on Nar Shadda. Guess Mako decided to get some new legs since we see him running after Han and Leia, and shooting at them together with Boba Fett and another bounty hunter.
But I hate it when authors kill a major character. Bria. I knew she was going to die, although I had hoped she would go off and leave Han again, looking for herself or something just like Callista in Planet of Twilight. I guess it was necessary though so that Han wouldn't have any more old girlfriends suddenly appearing. Still... I didn't like it.
At least, that also explains somewhat how the Rebels got the plans for the Death Star. A.C. did her research. I know of one source where she got the name of the system, Star Wars: The National Public Radio Dramatization. (Which I have by the way.)
It would be interesting to somehow have these events and people referred to in future novels. Chewie's wife and kid? I didn't know he had a famliy... unless my memory's failing me.
All in all, A.C. did a wonderful job "setting the stage for Han's role in the Star Wars films"... a great prologue for that galaxy far, far away...
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1.0 out of 5 stars More than lacking, 14 April 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Star Wars: The Han Solo Trilogy - Rebel Dawn: Rebel Dawn Book 3 (Mass Market Paperback)
Good writing is dependent upon a strong grasp on the most elementary of writing elements just as proper equations are necessarily depended upon the proper use of addition and subtraction. If AC Crispin, in Star Wars: Rebel Dawn (The Han Solo Trilogy vol. 3), has a grasp on grammar and punctuation, her sense of good writing stops there. The plot of this book is jumbled among so many rivaling conspiracies wherein party 1 wants party 2 dead and will pay party 3 to do it, but will then pay party 4 to kill party 3, except that party 4 wants party 2 alive and would just as soon kill party 1 and work for him, and so on. The problem with these intertwining subplots is that they hold no coherence. There are other books wherein more subplots, characters, allies and enemies exist but because of the skill of the writer, these all flow together in harmony. Crispin has far missed the mark of harmony and strikes her mark closer to the point of chaos and dissidence at which point music reverts back to its elemental compounds of noise: the vibration of air. Forgiving for a moment the poor structure and outline of the plot, there remains the problem of character reliability and motivation. Han's character is a great example of this. Originally portrayed as a solid man, hard and stable, a leader whose security rests in himself only then to reduce him to a man of no control, emotionally driven not goal driven, and back again, and back, and again, so many times the reader cares almost nothing for him by the end of the story. For example, in one scene, Han is painted as a man who must stoop to childish antics in order to be able to face the results of an injury which crippled his friend, Mako Spince. Han jabs callously at the accident, the aliens who caused it, even the results of it, only to be dismissed by the man. This childishness occurs again during his--long delayed meeting with Bria (which put an end to the multiple "near misses" which happen time and time again to the frustration of the reader), wherein his attitude is paramount to a child's temper tantrum. He is portrayed as a man who "can't deal with emotion" assuming because it is above him to be able to do so (it is just this sort of male-generalization which taints Crispin's story telling, which serves more to offend than involve male readers into the story). In this scene, Han is the weak one, the one who must "stomp" away, the one who later comes back to her because he was "wrong." Meanwhile, Bria is the rock, the one who is in control--as she has been throughout the story, leaving Han in the last book and avoiding him time and time again where she sees him in this edition--who is able to keep perspective of her "heart" by ranking it beneath her dedication to her cause, freedom of slaves at all cost. I have no problem with strong women, nor with weak men, but to reduce Han the equivalent of a sniveling child at the hands of a woman, who is so beyond emotion and humanity that it is difficult to distinguish between her and the robot guard of Xizor, that there lacks even the beginning of plausibility. In reference to Bria, she is cold and emotionless. She murders slavers, is their judge, jury and executioner (one of the many statements of a relativistic value system). She sacrifices herself, her life, even her supposed love for Han for a purpose which is "stately" more important to her. But is it, or rather does it seem as though it is? Not so much as it seems she is a manipulating individual set on the accomplishment of her set goals, freeing slaves, which seems-in light of her actions-no more noble than the greed-driven smuggling of Han, Lando and their friends. It is this double standard which is prevalent throughout the story and which is, in fact, one of the only recurring themes upon which the reader can depend. In AC Crispin's world, values are relative. Every character has their own. Bria can execute someone because they run slaves, but she can turn on Han, stab him in the back and even hold him hostage as it suits her purposes. This is only one case. Boba Fett, presented the Star Wars Universe over as the most feared bounty hunter, can kill as it suits him, anything for a challenge and profit, but then we are to consider it noble that he does not break his word. He says in fact, "I made someone a promise, and I always keep my word" (385). In another place he states his disagreement with the Empire and its politics, but then works with it to condemn the rebellion which is, in his opinion, the impetus of anarchy. Relativism, it even drives the Hutt plots which are, as has been mentioned already, so confusion one has not vested reason to place emotion or rational support for any side, leaving the reader feeling as though he is witness the unfolding of a congressional debate. This leads us to the lack of emotional involvement of the reader. Good writing involves the reader. It draws him, or her, in, holds him and in a way leads him by those emotional strands, whether he realizes it or not, to the determined destination of the author. The randomness of this story is such that the reader wonders whether the author had any predetermined destination in mind when she started. It lacks emotional involvement. We could try to chose the side of Han, but his tone is so superficially unlike his movie counterpart that we have no vested interest there. As for Bria, her determination that her decisions are justifiable regardless of the reason or cause leads us to have as much a bitter taste in our mouth for her as for him. We are supposed to take interest in her at the end of the story and at her eventual outcome, but for her to even suppose we would believe her thinking about Han at such a case is foolishness, as much as are her repetitive declarations of love. Which leaves us at what? Well, in light of the failed plot, the lack of emotional involvement mostly due to the changing characters' personas and the relativistic nature of the whole book, we are left supposing this to be less a Star Wars novel than AC Crispin's commentary on modern culture. She has her feminist aspect, and has Bria say--complete unrelated to the story, "As you've no doubt noticed, the Empire is a male-dominated, human dominated organization..." (36) She has her religious aspect, or anti-religious as the case may be, wherein she portrays the only religion in the book as that on Ylesia, in which, Bria says, " People are dying every day...good people. People who deserve better than a life of unending toil, malnutrition and cruel deception" (236). Crispin has her statement on morals and has a callous, vicious, heartless murdering bounty hunter declare, "I am a moral person"(207). Throw in a commentary on environmental conditions and Crispin would have covered all the major topics. What is the purpose for discussing this? To break publishers ideas that just because a book bears a title we are familiar with we will waste our time reading it even when the story is bad. To authors we say the same: just because a story is science fiction it does not mean that it can be bad or, worse, just because we are familiar with the title does not mean that the author has free reign to preach their version of culture, or mount a soap box and lambaste us using characters we have come to like, but begin to hate because of their manipulation. If nothing else, I have learned I will not read any more of Crispin's books; and, sadly, if Bantum continues to allow such unprofessionalism in style in their Star Wars books, I will not read them either. We, readers, the one's who spend our money, deserve more than being the blunt of some authors ideas under the deceptive cloak of story telling, whether it is called Star Wars or not.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Predictable: In the future, give the fans something better!, 21 Mar 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Star Wars: The Han Solo Trilogy - Rebel Dawn: Rebel Dawn Book 3 (Mass Market Paperback)
"Rebel Dawn" is the conclusion of the Han Solo Trilogy. Essentially this book deals with Han Solo's adventures up until the famous cantina scene in "A New Hope" in which Ben and Luke are about to charter the Falcon. We learn how: Han was almost trapped into marriage, won the Falcon from Lando, and first meets up with the Rebel Alliance and the reason why he dislikes them so much. All in all this novel is filled with holes bigger than those made by asteroids to the Falcon. Why? Mistakenly, in the first two books I blamed Crispin. I've since learned that the interesting phrase "intellectual property" comes into play. Lucas, creator of Star Wars, has the final say on what authors can and cannot write about. Strangely enough, we're given immense detail in unimportant situations and blanks in other areas.

For example, Han Solo disappears into the Corporate Sector from pages 147 to page 245. What is he doing? He's busy going through the adventures Brian Daley wrote about Han. Since Lucasfilm is tying up every single thread to the continuity of the Star Wars universe, we're given huge plot holes. Unless you're a religious Star Wars fan you're not going to have a clue as to why Han is out of the picture for nearly a hundred pages. Basically, this makes the book boring. Everyone knows Han isn't going to die. Instead, we're supposed to pay $6 to read a book filled with explanations on how Han bumped into every minor character ever mentioned in all the Star Wars books. (Hey, if any of the Ballantine/Del Rey folks read this review, do us, the fans, a favor: Work on creating better plot lines! I don't care how Han met up with a minor character in an earlier book. Really, I don't! How about a Chewie trilogy or some area which wouldn't be so strictly controlled by what Lucas wants to remain hidden? Dare I say: something original!)

Because of these plot holes with Han missing for nearly 100 pages, "Rebel Dawn" lags, stutters, unable to get into hyperspace. Once Crispin soars away from the holy ground of the Star Wars continuity, her strongest scenes are those which explain the malicious world of the Hutts. Throughout the book, Han's path is already chartered and he's a pretty flat character. But Crispin has more room to write about Durga and Jabba and it shows.

I've reflected back over my review of the first two books of the Han Solo trilogy ("The Paradise Snare" and "The Hutt Gambit") and I believe I've been a bit rough on Ann Crispin. She is a good writer, but I must offer a suggestion to her: Please, please, please do me a favor? The next time you wish to describe blaster fire or someone falling you might wish to write something different than "Ptchoo. Ptchoo. Ptchoo" and "Thud." These type of "sounds" really detracted from your book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A good book, it still didn't live up to the first two., 16 Nov 1998
By A Customer
I like Han Solo a lot. The first two books were fabulous, but this didn't have the bang the first two built up. Some of the explanations were unacceptable, like the Kessel Run toward the end. The Millenium Falcon made the Kessel Run in less than 12 parsecs as sublight speeds? Come on, that doesn't make sense. It was supposed to be made in hyperspace. A.C. Crispin revealed all of Han's mentioned friends except for the Briil twins, who Han mentions to Roa in Han Solo's Revenge. I thought the book would have a scene in which Han plays a joke on Lando by using the Tonnika sisters (The weaved girls in the Mos Eisley Cantina scene in SW: A New Hope), vaguely mentioned in a short story. Otherwise the book is great. The series it self shows why Solo is solo. He treats Princess Leia like how he does because Bria hurt him. He even told himself he would never let it happen again. He hates slavers because he used to basically be a slave for Garris Shrike. But the series smartly left out things which are best left unrevealed; who his parents are, why they left him, etc. Personally, I think that Garris Shrike is his father. He gave Han his last name, but where he got it from is unknown. He is abusefully mean to the boy with a personal interest. Sort of a disorder of some kind. But all in all, the book was pleasing, if not fullfilling to my tastes, as I am a stickler for detail and explanation when it comes to Star Wars.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Why do...all the people...talk like...this?, 21 May 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Star Wars: The Han Solo Trilogy - Rebel Dawn: Rebel Dawn Book 3 (Mass Market Paperback)
I tried, I really tried, to like this triology. I read all the glowing reviews on this website and went out and bought all three books. The first was interesting (The Paradise Snare), the second was passable (The Hutt Gambit), but the third (Rebel Dawn) was really awful. I had a terrible time believing anything coming out of Han's mouth. And the situations?? Han Solo as magician's assistant in a spangly spandex costume? Come on! Is this how we think of our hero? The whole ordeal of his relationship with Bria (ugh--I found the whole thing so fake) and on and on. I think that Brian Daley (to whom Crispin acknowledges in the opening page of the book) did a MUCH better job characterizing Han Solo. And my personal pet peeve--everyone talks in...stilted...elipses. And there was so much "backslapping" and "chest thumping" I was hoping Crispin would find a new word for it. The third book should've been called "tales of the Hutt" since the majority of the book was devoted to THEM. Like I said, I really tried, but I skipped whole chapters thinking "get to the point!" BTW, there is a TYPO on page one of the acknowledgements (not Crispin's fault, but a bad omen nonetheless).
PS: I liked her StarTrek book. I just didn't like her characterizations in the Star Wars trilogy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A.C. Crisipin Wraps Up Trilogy in Grand Style, 20 April 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Star Wars: The Han Solo Trilogy - Rebel Dawn: Rebel Dawn Book 3 (Mass Market Paperback)
I won't write a thesis on this book, <wink, wink> but I thought it was a great wrap up to the "Han Solo Trilogy". Crispin weaves into her story old and familiar characters as well as new and intriguing ones. None of these are thrown in as window dressings, big or small they are intergral to the plot of Rebel Dawn and link to the original trilogy
Readers are invited to explore Wookie culture that has somewhat been overlooked in other Star Wars novels (lone exception being Tyrant's Test). Chewbacca is given a voice and a story.
Han's motivation in the original trilogy is now more understandable given the background story Crispin has created. I thought the author stayed true to Bria's character development.
Not to over-analyze, but this is a character that wasn't painted with broad white and black strokes, but gray. She evolved into who she was based on her life experiences. She's was not Leia, but I think that is a good thing.We did not need a princess "clone"--what we got was a young woman, passionate about her beliefs whose methods weren't always pretty. I can buy into that.

Hopefully I'll also be able to buy some more SW books by Crispin!
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5.0 out of 5 stars PRETTY DAMN GOOD!!!!, 10 July 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Star Wars: The Han Solo Trilogy - Rebel Dawn: Rebel Dawn Book 3 (Mass Market Paperback)
This book was a really cool way to end off this trilogy and move to the next. The end is very sad and appearances by Boba Fett add to the overall goodness of this book. I read the first two as soon as they came out and since I have to read trilogies in sequential order, I didn't touch another book until I bought this one. Now I know why Han owed Jabba and how Han got the Falcon. And why Lando was so mad in the Empire Strikes Back. A.C. Crispin is a very talented writer (even though Han in spandex isn't a lovely thought). The Bria and Han relationship was really cool, with its unexpected twists and turns. This trilogy goes right up there with the current movie trilogy. In fact, I think it would be kewl if they made a movie out of it. Han is a superfreak. Chewie is a kewl Wookiee. Muurgh is a kewl Togorian. And last but not least, Kibbick is an idiot! This is a must read for any fan of Han Solo, even though there are a lot of subplots that don't even involve him until later on. There are a lot of cameos by major characters of the movie trilogy. This shows that when you take out all that Jedi crap, you come out with a really good story.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A very detailed book that will give you sleep-deprivation!, 7 Jun 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Star Wars: The Han Solo Trilogy - Rebel Dawn: Rebel Dawn Book 3 (Mass Market Paperback)
I think that the entire Han Solo Trilogy was a masterpiece. I've found out new information about Han Solo's past and what it was like. I think that Rebel Dawn is the best book in the trilogy. It fills in a lot of gaps and has an intruiging plot. However, I think that Crispin used too much of the book on the Hutts. Other than that, the book itself is exellent and should be read by any true Star Wars fan. One more thing... I've read all the books in the Han Solo Trilogy and there is a HUGE contradiction with Timothy Zahn's trilogy. In Dark Force Rising, if you read it carefully, there is a part where Han Solo meets a former senator of Corellia, Garm Bel Iblis. Garm Bel Iblis says that he remembers Han from an event when Han was 11 years old, he visited the school in which Han was attending and he took an interest in him because Han asked the then-senator Iblis 2 very unusual questions. Now in Crispin's trilogy, it says that Han was captured by Garris Shrike when he was 7 years old and he lived on the Trader's Luck with Shrike until he escaped. If you've read both these trilogies, you should consider looking up this error.
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Star Wars: The Han Solo Trilogy - Rebel Dawn: Rebel Dawn Book 3
Star Wars: The Han Solo Trilogy - Rebel Dawn: Rebel Dawn Book 3 by A. C. Crispin (Mass Market Paperback - 1 July 1998)
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