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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't put it down.
A must read for anyone who's interests lie in this field of study. From the first word to the last, the book held my attention with it's beautiful imagery and style. It will change the way you think and your view of the world. It is truly one of the most powerful pieces of literature that I have ever read. Hank Wesselman is a true visionary whose experiences...
Published on 31 Jan. 1999

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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Lacking...
This is a story, probably inspired by OBEs, as Hank says.

However, it lacks a (self)critical approach, and a wider awareness, which places it alongside many other writings of the 'shamanic' genre.

Hank is not describing 'the future'. Insofar as it may exist, the places that Hank visited are most likely in a parallel 'universe', accessed through our...
Published on 12 Oct. 2009 by Em


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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't put it down., 31 Jan. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Spiritwalker: Messages from the Future (Paperback)
A must read for anyone who's interests lie in this field of study. From the first word to the last, the book held my attention with it's beautiful imagery and style. It will change the way you think and your view of the world. It is truly one of the most powerful pieces of literature that I have ever read. Hank Wesselman is a true visionary whose experiences within the spirtworld hold truth and enlightenment. If your looking for a book that deals with the spiritual aspects of youself then this is the book for you.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought Provoking, 28 Jan. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Spiritwalker: Messages from the Future (Paperback)
At first I was really bored by Wesselman's description of his experiences. I've read a lot of New Age books and I was thinking this is just another guy telling about his 'weird experience'. However once he met Nainoa and started describing life in the future, I got interested. I was very surprised by his discussion of metals. We really take a lot for granted these days and this book will make you think about what life would be like without the conveniences we have today.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a great book., 6 Jun. 2011
By 
A D. Petch "petchasketch" (South England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Spiritwalker: Messages from the Future (Paperback)
I first came across Hank Wesselman on `conscious media network' on sky, casually flicking through the channels; I stopped there and watched him speaking in an interview.

Its a strange but enriching feeling when you think back and notice a chain of events that leads you to places and situations and books, and that interview I watched certainly was another link in the chain that started with buying my first crystal when I was 18. A feeling of underlying magic was bought to the surface, which was amplified by the readings of the 'spiritwalker trilogy'.

A beautifully written book with moments of epiphany that make the world sparkle. The descriptions are vivid and images will flow through your mind. This book is woven together with a clear and serious message that should not be ignored for the sake of man kind, the act of taking and taking and not giving back to the world. There is daunting and mounting evidence that suggests the ways in which western civilization as we know it will cease to be. On a hopeful note for the future Hank Wesselman writes of a wide spread spiritual reawakening that is coming into fruition that I'm glad to say I'm apart of.

I highly recommend the works of Hank Wesselman, including the other two books in this trilogy, 'medicine maker' and `visionseeker' - equally as great
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4.0 out of 5 stars worth reading, 23 Feb. 2012
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This review is from: Spiritwalker: Messages from the Future (Paperback)
I saw the author interviewed by Regina Meredith on tv, a credible man with an incredible story so sent for this and the sequel Medicinemaker which I have yet to read.
It is a good book and most people will enjoy the read. It is also "interesting" and there are at least two observations by the author that I have not come across previously and which struck me as possibly validating his experiences.
Some 70 or so pages in I remembered the Edgar Rice Burroughs books I had read as a teenager over 40 years ago - the Martian trilogy came to mind, where the hero used a portal to visit and adventure on the red planet....Michael Moorcock copied the idea with his own Martian trilogy, and one can think of the wardrobe in CS Lewis's Narnia, or the ring in Tolkein, giving the heroes access to alternate realities. (Gulliver just got on a ship and sailed to his strange lands.) So, I suppose my intuition reminded me this could all be the product of the author's imagination. For details of Hawaiin lore there are also to be remembered the works of W D Westervelt written 1915 and 1916:Hawaiian Legends of Volcanoes, Hawaiian Legends of the old Honolulu, and Hawaiian Legends of Ghosts and Ghost-Gods.
As I got further into the book I felt uncomfortable at the author's apparent pushing of a climate change agenda. Sure, the climate may be changing, but not necessarily because of the reasons we are being given.
His description of the creation of the universe broadly agrees with the Corpus Hermeticum and other works.
So,would I recommend the book - yes, I enjoyed reading it, I learned from it. Do I believe it? Let's say I'll accept it is true for Dr Wesselman and that is the path he is on. Wesselman is pushing the right message but it's not necessarily the right path for everyone.
I am looking forward to reading Medicinemaker and may post a review later.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Food for thought, 5 Jun. 2010
By 
Mr. J. Young (EU) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Spiritwalker: Messages from the Future (Paperback)
Just read this book after watching an interview with the author on Conscious Media Network TV (SKY Ch. 200). Slightly depressing stuff in my opinion.

I think Hank has an anthropogenic global-warming political agenda and I seriously doubt the "authenticity" of his shaman-like future predictions. More a product of his fertile imagination I think (or rather hope perhaps). Parts of it strongly reminded me of Jean Auel and the "Earth's Children" series, which is set in stone-age Europe rather than the "future" USA; except from a male rather than female point of view.

Essentially Hank says that if the human population suddenly crashes far enough, we will hit a "bottleneck" and any humans who make it through the bottleneck (1% or 10%?) will rapidly lose thousands of years of technology. So that perhaps in 5,000 years time we will be back to present day minus 10,000 years, or more. I would rather hope that any humans surviving in such adversity would be a lot more inventive and creative than that. That we would only drop back 300 years or so at worst, rather than go back to a hunter-gatherer stone age (plus salvaged metals from our present day technology) kind of life. Sounds all a bit too much like a future "Lost Age of Atlantis" myth I think.

The Zeitgeist type sustainable green technology "Venus-Project" looks much more attractive to me.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars spiritwalker, 12 Mar. 2009
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This review is from: Spiritwalker: Messages from the Future (Paperback)
Not even halfway through but can't put this down, I'm sure there will be a message in the book but enjoying it for the story at the moment.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Different and fascinating, 20 Dec. 2010
By 
Iona Main Stewart (Odense, Denmark) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Spiritwalker: Messages from the Future (Paperback)
This book differs from those I usually read. Though extremely well-written, at first it was somewhat boring because of the long passages about nature - not what I'm used to reading or have any great desire to read. But once I got into the book I relinquished myself to it, and just started reading it like a novel. That helped. Then it became quite addictive.

The book comprises a true description of the process of an anthropologist (the author) who begins to experience strange sensations when falling asleep, which end in his being transported into the body and consciousness of a man called Nainoa who lives 5000 years in the future in California.

Actually, Nainoa leads such a primitive life that you might be inclined to think that it were 5000 years back in the past, the explanation being that there had been a catastrophe in the past, i.e.the author's near future (Surprise, surprise!) that practically wiped out life on Earth, so those surviving had to start again from the beginning.

Nainoa is a clerk to the High Chief Kaneohe and enjoyes a close relationship with him. Their people were apparently Hawaiians in origin, but had journeyed to the American coast. The chief now wants Nainoa to go on a journey alone into the interior of the American continent in order to explore, and thus find out what is there.

This journey of Nainoa is what the bulk of the book is about It is seen through the author's eyes during his astral journeys via the eyes of Nainoa, who is apparently his descendant. (The author has two young children at the time of the described experiences.)

During his travels Nainoa encounters a primitive community (the Ennu) that has survived the great ordeals that took place on the Earth (presumably the Shift). William, an elderly spiritwalker, saves Nainoa who has been attacked by a bull and injured, and later Nainoa takes William's daughter Kenojelak as his wife. This woman greatly resembles the author Wesselman's own wife. Jill.

When Wesselman merged with Nainoa it was as though the two existed "simultaneously within one physical body", and Nainoa seemed unaware of the other's presence.

One of the curious facts revealed in the book is that a stone discovered by Wesselman in the sea, which he later carved, turned up as a revered "spirit stone" of great power in the society originally lived in by Nainoa. Apparently, Wesselman found it in Hawaii, where he was living, and transported it to his home in California. Chief Kaneohe termed it "the stone that journeys".

The crucial points of interest in the book are Wesselman's altered-state experiences, including his encounters with the "Shadow", the leopard-man and later the spirit of Pele, a Hawaiian volcano. Nainoa himself begins to experience these states and meets the same personages, though his "leopard-man is called the "tiger man". Nainoa makes similar joruneys into Wesselman's body, experiencing various episodes in the latter's life. Wesselman then is cognizant of these things through Nainoa. All a bit complicated, but fascinating.

Both William, Nainoa and Wesselman himself are "spiritwalkers" who "journey across time and space". At one point Naianoa/Wesselman fly in the body of a hawk in true shaman style. Towards the end of the book there is a description of how Nainoa and Wesselman actually meet and communicate with each other (in spirit).

During Wesselman's processs of development via his various altered-state experiences he sees visions and gains much insight regarding human history and "the vast collective mind of the universe".

There is much use of Hawaiian terms which in places renders understanding difficult. It would have been easier had there been a list at the back of the book explaining these terms, since it proved difficult to remember their meaning, there being so many of them.

It is indicated that catastrophc earth changes will soon occur (presumably at the end of 2012) but the author does not mention this.

Actually, it is my understanding that there exist many possible futures, and no future has to happen, it all depends on ourselves. And there is no mention of any ascension into the 4th dimension, as indicated by other sources. (Our Earth, Gaia, our sun, Ra, and the other planets in our solar system, together with us ourselves, are expected to ascend on 21st December, 2012). But since Gaia's soul is ascending, our 3-dimensional Earth would be left soulless in the time thereafter, and I don't comprehend how this would work. But this is apparently a matter beyond the range of this book.

Anyway, nonetheless this is quite a fascinating book, particularly perhaps if one is new to the world of Shamanism, and it is well worth reading.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An interesting book for people aware that there are ancient beliefs and experiences that ring true., 3 Dec. 2013
By 
Trish. NIBLOCK (Edinburgh Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Spiritwalker: Messages from the Future (Paperback)
An interesting book written so that is easy to walk into the experiences of the writer and know that he is writing truthfully.

I have read about the ancient esoteric secrets of the Huna and am fascinated by their beliefs.

It is a huge subject and this book is a good introduction.

Trish Niblock
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Lacking..., 12 Oct. 2009
This review is from: Spiritwalker: Messages from the Future (Paperback)
This is a story, probably inspired by OBEs, as Hank says.

However, it lacks a (self)critical approach, and a wider awareness, which places it alongside many other writings of the 'shamanic' genre.

Hank is not describing 'the future'. Insofar as it may exist, the places that Hank visited are most likely in a parallel 'universe', accessed through our inner self, and most probably facilitated by a bunch of inorganic beings - who have their own agendas!

Hank/Nainoa and their beautiful wives/women, their adventures and achievements really shed very little, if any, serious, new light on the enduring mystery of awareness, and our existence in this world.

If you are after 'knowledge', you will need to read much, much more widely.

Good luck.
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5.0 out of 5 stars spirituality, 1 April 2013
By 
T. Fryer "Maud" (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Spiritwalker: Messages from the Future (Paperback)
a book to help you still your mind and learn to walk in other realms. The writer uses scientific methods to review what happens to him. The panther man could be quite real, in fact my dogs destroyed the book!
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Spiritwalker: Messages from the Future
Spiritwalker: Messages from the Future by Hank Wesselman (Paperback - 5 Oct. 1998)
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