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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What thriller!!!
This book has really converted me to a Forsyth and spy novel fan. This was an excellent novel with great insight as to how spies really work. Even if the spying methods were fictional, they could easily have been true and could be applied in modern-day espionage.

The story plot was gripping with many twists and turns. It was realistic and sometimes harsh on...
Published on 19 Feb 2008 by A. Harsono

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars More like a history lesson.
Whilst a good background is essential in building the picture, at least a quarter this book was devoted to explaining almost in encyclopaedic fashion what the previous paragraph referred to. Another quarter involved revisiting the events of the first Gulf War. Less than half was actually a work of fiction and if slimmed down to this, it wouldn't be much of a read! Makes...
Published 10 months ago by David Cordell


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What thriller!!!, 19 Feb 2008
This review is from: The Fist Of God : (Paperback)
This book has really converted me to a Forsyth and spy novel fan. This was an excellent novel with great insight as to how spies really work. Even if the spying methods were fictional, they could easily have been true and could be applied in modern-day espionage.

The story plot was gripping with many twists and turns. It was realistic and sometimes harsh on some characters but chances are that's just the way things are in real life. As I am writing this review, I have already finished reading 'The Afghan' and am currently in the middle of 'The Deceiver'. If you like spy novels, look no further. Great job, Frederick!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A seriously good read, 22 Sep 2010
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This review is from: The Fist Of God : (Paperback)
This is a well researched blend of fact and fiction. I've read literally hundreds of anti-terrorism/SAS type thrillers and this is one of the very best. The first few pages appear a little dry but it very relevant as one progresses through the story. Highly recommended.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vintage Forsyth., 10 Feb 2009
By 
S. Lee "sl010c0016" (UK.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Fist Of God : (Paperback)
It's been a few years since I've read a Frederick Forsyth novel. With a renewed interest in the thriller genre I decided to visit my favourite thriller writer once more, I wasn't disappointed. He has a way of drawing you into his novels and it wont shake until you finish it. His attention to detail and his style of thriller writing are simply unbeatable.

Some try to knock him off his pedestal but none realy succeed. Jack Higgins has fallen away of late, Stephen Leather isn't everyone's cup of tea, and Tom Clancy can be a bit too American gung ho. The only writer IMO that comes near is Gerald Seymour.

The Fist Of God is a simple 'faction' idea that the parts of the Iraqi cannon that were discovered prior to the invasion of Kuwait was part of a weapon of mass destruction that Iraq was creating. Various parts of this 'weapon' were discovered in various places. The idea is that one had already been built prior to this. An SAS man infiltrates Iraq to find the weapon by running an Iraqi spy called Jericho. There's a fair bit more to the story, but that's the gist of it.
Once I started reading I couldn't put it down, buy and enjoy.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable thriller, 9 Dec 2013
By 
Bacchus (Greater London - Surrey) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Fist Of God : (Paperback)
This is not my particular genre. I read it because I had been to see a couple of sections of the Iraqi supergun at the National Armouries Museum (they are massive!) and read an account in the museum of how its designer, Gerald Bull had been assassinated by Mossad. A further wikipedia search showed that Frederick Forsyth had dramatised this epidode in The Fist of God.

While this incident and its background take up the first chapter of the book, it is not really what the book is about. The book concerns the preparations for the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1990 and the undercover work by a British SAS officer Mike Martin (who just happened to have been brought up in Iraq and who because of his mother looks quite Arabic). Most of the action takes place in Kuwait and later in Iraq itself and it makes for an exciting pacy thriller.

Forsyth's style is quite journalistic, with plenty of background information about spying and military machinery. It is not particularly strong on the presentation and development of three dimensional characters but I don't suppose the book's intended audience is particularly interested. The author's pro Conservative political views come across strongly at times. It doesn't annoy me too much it might others, for example, he takes time out of the narrative to give his take on the leadership campaign that led to Margaret Thatcher's resignation. It adds nothing to the story.

The central tale seems to be about a mole called Jericho who is selling classified inside information (and being picked up by Martin) in exchange for payments in a private Austrian bank account. It had me guessing about his identity (there are some decent red herrings here and there) but when it was revealed, I felt slightly short-changed. The honey trap seduction of a bank employee by an undercover Mossad agent, to me, felt superfluous to the overall plot, which was a shame because it was quite interesting.

I did enjoy this book but found it slighly flawed in execution.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping tale with a lot of accuracy, 19 Aug 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Fist Of God : (Paperback)
I serve in the armed forces, and having read this book, I am impressed with the amount of detail and accuracy found. It it a shame that other authors don't take the time to find out the little things, which would make the story believable to the people in the know. Very well done. A great book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars book review, 13 Jan 2013
By 
E. A. Tranter "lool" (Jakes Mums Room) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Fist Of God (Kindle Edition)
As always another excellent story from Frederick Forsyth. Well thought out and intricate plot, interesting character set, a real page turner
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Edge of Your Seat Thriller with a Fascinating Plot!, 6 Aug 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
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Edge of Your Seat Thriller with Fascinating Plot!, January 28, 2001
This is my favorite of the Forsyth novels.
Frederick Forsyth is a masterful plotter. In this case, he has woven a story that unusual complexity with delicate balance of perspectives using real details. I remember reading about everything mentioned in this book in some press report related to the Gulf War against the Iraqis after the invasion of Kuwait. The plot is so well done that it will add new depths to your understanding of the political considerations that played such a large role in the Gulf War. If government studies were written as interestingly as this novel is, all college students would be government majors. There is fascinating technology in the story, but the novel is reined in by large doses of realism that make the material more interesting for its relevance.
If you are like me, you have often wondered about the following questions:
(1) Why did Saddam Hussein survive the successful prosecution of the war by the allies?
(2) How might target planners determine where weapons of mass destruction were being developed and housed?
(3) Why did Saddam Hussein prepare so poorly for the U.S.-led attack?
(4) Why did the Iraqis stop with Kuwait, when the more attractive target of Saudi Arabia lay just ahead essentially undefended?
Mr. Forsyth offers a number of plausible and interesting possible answers to these and other questions you surely have had and may still have.
To me, the drawback of a Forsyth novel is that they can become bogged down in too much detail. Foreign names can also quickly cause the eyes to glaze over as well. You will be pleased to know that this abridgement (approved by Mr. Forsyth) overcomes both of those potential problems. The elegant plot is tautly maintained, and moves along rapidly. Mr. Jones takes all of the tongue-twisting, unfamilar names and pronounces them in accented ways that capture the lyricism inherent in the various Middle Eastern and European cultures displayed here.
I have only one complaint. Unfortunately, Mr. Jones chose to characterize many Americans as "cowboys" so those characters' raw, harsh accents will be the least attractive to listen to for you.
Some of the most interesting aspects of the book for me included Major Mike Morgan's (of Britain's Special Air Service) operations behind enemy lines in Kuwait and Iran, the psychology of the inner council that served Saddam Hussein, the complicity of Western sources in making dangerous weapons available to the Iraqis, the methods by which many different types of intelligence sources can be used to build a composite picture of an issue, the morality of trying to save lives in combat, and the political agendas of the Americans. Israelis will find the operations of the Mossad described in ways that are highly complimentary about that country's intelligence operations.
One of the really intriguing thoughts you will have after reading this book is what secrets are still being kept about American intentions towards Iraq.
After you finish enjoying hearing this book read to you, I suggest that you find a veteran of the Gulf War who feels comfortable taling about it, and ask what her or his impressions are of what happened there. Although most of us watched this nightly on CNN, we have perhaps become too distanced from the fundamental horrors of war. This will be a good way to be sure that we learn the lessons that should be learned from this experience, and also honor those who served the world in the desert.
May the fist of God always be relaxed into the open hand of God's peace.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Typically Good, 9 Dec 2002
This review is from: The Fist Of God : (Paperback)
It is difficult to be critical when an author can set and maintain such high standards.
The Gulf War is the setting here and Forsyth sets up a plot involving the then main characters beautifully. The whole story smacks as though it is written by someone well in the know and this is a real credit to him.
Perhaps a couple of the good guys have too easy a run in this novel and there is a little too much coincidence, but these small matters are balanced out by the rest of what Forsyth achieves.
What made the book even more interesting for me was the fact although Forsyth wrote this after the Gulf War, the crucial elements of his story - Hussein, Iraq and weapons of mass-destruction etc. - remain so very topical today.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A magnum opus, 19 April 2001
By 
A. Gatt (Malta) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Fist Of God : (Paperback)
This book is not only adroitly written and paced; it also makes the reader feel very hip. Spies, traitors, harlots, explosions and excruciating detail make this book a winner. Forsyth at his very best!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A thrill a minute book, 8 Sep 2000
This review is from: The Fist Of God : (Paperback)
This is the first Frederick Forsyth book I have read and I found it was... well, I can't really find the words to describe it it was so good. The amount of research he must have done must ave taken longer than writing the book itself! I am definately now going to read his entire series.
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The Fist of God
The Fist of God by Frederick Forsyth (Hardcover - Jun 1994)
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