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5.0 out of 5 stars The mysterious world of Maia and her mirror twin Leie.
This is one of the best book I have read so far. Trust me, I have read books. Although this is only the first book I have read by David Brin, I really admire his work. This book about a planet where most of the people there are female clones is pretty exciting and full of adventures. I cannot express how much I recommend this book enough. I am really looking forward...
Published on 13 Dec 1998

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3.0 out of 5 stars Poor Kindle transfer
The book's quite good - interesting premise with a lot of promise, but it cuts off rather abruptly with a lot of loose ends. It feels like a rush job towards the end that would have been better with a full sequel.

The Kindle version appears to be a poor scan version, lots of errors like "bit his bottom Up" (should be lip) and people's names replaced with...
Published 16 months ago by Keith Henry


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3.0 out of 5 stars Poor Kindle transfer, 25 Feb 2013
By 
Keith Henry - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Glory Season (Kindle Edition)
The book's quite good - interesting premise with a lot of promise, but it cuts off rather abruptly with a lot of loose ends. It feels like a rush job towards the end that would have been better with a full sequel.

The Kindle version appears to be a poor scan version, lots of errors like "bit his bottom Up" (should be lip) and people's names replaced with similar words. Not a big problem, but a shoddy job from the publisher.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not as Good as Uplift, 1 Jun 2008
By 
Roger Cawkwell (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Glory Season (Paperback)
I won't go into details of the plot as some of this has been covered in other reviews & I don't want to add more spoilers. It took me a little while to get into this book but after 100 pages or so I found myself curiously gripped by the protagonist's fate and wanted to read more.

As has been flagged elsewhere, the plot is a little repetitive, especially in the matter of Maia being kidnapped and then escaping, to the point when I began to think, Oh no, not again... I couldn't quite believe the ending - I thought that there must be another chapter somewhere. Perhaps I should re-read the last one but there seemed to be serious discrepancies between what was said to Maia and what actually happened. Though actually I can't be bothered as I have other things to read.

Brin is a seriously good author, especially in the matter of being able to imagine alien societies and make them reasonably convincing, but this book needs editing.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent - In Parts..., 28 Dec 2003
By 
M. LOCK "Custer" (Northwood, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Glory Season (Bantam Spectra Book) (Hardcover)
I found Maia's voyage of discovery around her strange, female clone-dominated world very enjoyable, but I don't think it is one of David Brin's best books. She, a summer "var" conceived the old-fashioned way, certainly grows as a character as her adventures continue, but she does seem to spend a lot of time in various captivities, and while major and exciting events do unfold around her towards the end, too often the best bits happen "off camera" - having her read a hurried letter from a friend is not the same as being there! The apparent death of a major character is rather inconclusive, and the book does not really have that great an ending.
Still, the strange new world we progress through is always interesting, and Maia is an engaging character. I certainly don't regret the time I took to read the book, and will be checking out more of Brin's work soon.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good but not Brin's best, 13 Nov 2002
This review is from: Glory Season (Paperback)
This book is the closest to Fantasy that David Brin has come.
It is a big "what if..." (see the book description) with good characters and a nice adventure but it is a bit slow paced and somehow, I hardly ever come back to this book to re-read it completly or even just a chapter or two.
As wirtten by the previous reviewer, this book is quite different from the Uplift saga. If you liked Earth and Postman, give this one try but don't put your hopes to high.
If you like this book very much, go look around for Guy Gavriel Kay books.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The mysterious world of Maia and her mirror twin Leie., 13 Dec 1998
By A Customer
This is one of the best book I have read so far. Trust me, I have read books. Although this is only the first book I have read by David Brin, I really admire his work. This book about a planet where most of the people there are female clones is pretty exciting and full of adventures. I cannot express how much I recommend this book enough. I am really looking forward to reading Brin's other books.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Glory Season is a feminist Utopian novel, very readable, 7 Oct 1998
By A Customer
Glory Season follows the beginning of reintegration into the human family of the hidden planet Femina, whose founders explicitly re- engineered women's biology to allow parthenogenesis (same device as the 1915 feminist Utopian novel Herland used for reproducing that all-female society). Their motivation was simple: the problems that caused women to need the protection of good men were almost all caused by bad men, they considered, so ------ they decided to dispense with men and simplify life. This feminine civilization turned out to be heavy on crafts and light on machinery, which is plausible. Clans of identical clones formed, which specialized in specific economic niches. The least convincing point in the novel to me is that Brin (who also wrote The Postman, which was made into a recent Kevin Costner movie) makes some women pirates and soldiers, as if every function in our world would have a feminine equivalent there, but I very much doubt that would happen. Echoes of the classic Herland are obvious throughout this modernized and readable version, which takes the point of view of the women, not the interlopers.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Speculative fiction at its best., 3 July 1998
By A Customer
Glory Season is socially conscious, broad in scope, and well considered. Brin does not restrict his vision, but allows it to run where it will, carefully considering the likely results of speculative concepts, positively littering his books with miniscule gems, any of which might be the entire concept of the work of a lesser writer.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Proof that a good thrashing can't keep the strong ones down, 8 Nov 1997
By A Customer
In a life where the dice is already loaded, favoring THEM, _Glory Season_ proves that it isn't easy to survive, but it can be done. Maia spends most of the novel on the run from somebody, captured, escaping, or healing from fresh wounds. Nothing whatsoever seems to go right for the girl, about the equivilant of 15 years of age and very much alone in life. One of the fantastic elements of Brin's work is that when the story unfolds, it keeps going. The circumstances are not laid out all at once, but rather are carefully and delicately given to the reader as if a gift from the author -- not uncommon in Brin's writing style -- something gratefully received after many years of the most basic and monotonous of books. After reading _Glory Season_ the reader is left fulfilled, proud of Maia as if perhaps she was their own daughter, a brave soldier and veteran of life.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An interesting world to explore, 22 Mar 1997
By A Customer
Since I'm not female, I can't really judge how feminist
this book really is. My suspicion is that some feminists would have preferred a more radical viewpoint. Having
said that, the book still reveals an interesting world to read about.
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5.0 out of 5 stars THE FIRST FEMINIST SF NOVEL WRITTEN BY A MAN, 27 Feb 1997
By A Customer
BRIN IS ONE MY FAVORITE SF NOVELIST. GLORY SEASON IS A CLASSIC SF NOVEL. BRIN TAKES US INTO A WORLD WHERE CLONED WOMEN RULE AND WOMEN BORN NATURALLY(VARS) ARE SECOND CLASS CITIZENS AND MEN ARE THIRD CLASS CITIZENS.HE THROWS IN COMING OF AGE STORY, A MALE ALIEN FROM EARTH AND NEAR REVOLUTION.
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Glory Season (Bantam Spectra Book)
Glory Season (Bantam Spectra Book) by David Brin (Hardcover - Jun 1993)
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