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50 of 53 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read it and Weep
Book review: Gemaine Greer, The Whole Woman
"You've come a long way baby!" Remember the cigarette ad from the 70s? To hear Germaine Greer tell it we haven't, unless progress is having won the right to smoke thin cigarettes in public and take our chemotherapy like a man.
Since writing The Female Eunuch, Dr. Greer is still angry after these thirty-two...
Published on 5 Mar. 2002 by mfdb

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33 of 38 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Flashes of brilliance and loony paranoia
Poor old Germaine! Just when you're thumping the page and crying a quasi orgasmic "yes! yes!" she lets you down in the next chapter with a diatribe on some imagined male conspiracy against women. Hers is a brain that takes logical arguments to such an extreme that, eventually, she loses the plot entirely. It's a shame, because when she gets it right there...
Published on 17 May 1999


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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A remarkable Journey of the Mind and Spirit, 2 Mar. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Whole Woman (Hardcover)
What can I say? Greer says it all in her characteristically, brilliant witty style. This sequel, the book she refused for thirty years to write, goes well beyond the frontiers of _The Female Eunuch_.
Most of Greer's works, are 'Tomes of Insight' - but this latest is her best yet, and truly describes the 'Whole Woman' - through love, sex, motherhood, lesbianism - work, power, men and so forth. Despite its anger, its black humour and wit, and its scholarly style, it ends on a positive note. In summary, I can only quote Greer's own words: "It's time to get angry again."
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars So disappointing, 17 Nov. 2011
This review is from: The Whole Woman (Paperback)
I have read and read this book over so many years.. I have the hard back version. I find it so sad that it displays the worst form of trans-phobia available in literary form. I think anyone reading this chapter would wonder if it had been written by a Daily Mail journalist. In fact i think it borders on hatred.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Who says i have to agree with everything in this book?, 9 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Whole Woman (Hardcover)
I love this book. It is amazing, and, it has to be said, very few people still write anything like this. I don't agree with everything Greer says, but then i don't have to: she is forty years older than me and if her book inspires someone of my generation to write the next 'Female Eunuch' then it will have served its purpose. When I read her first novel, the Female Eunuch, it wasn't so much as a piece of feminist literature as a primary historical source. Yet I feel I owe a debt to Greer and her contemporaries for writing such works and creating the workd in which I grew up.
Many criticisms of The Whole Woman have centred on Greer's discussion of 'Pantomine Dames' and supposed defence of female genital mutilation. Whether or not you agree with her conclusions, I think she raises some extremely valid points surrounding these topics, such as, do we construct the Female negatively (ie. by the omission of a male genitalia rather than the possession of female genitalia?) - and, of course, the post-colonial relationship between Western women and women in developing nations. Whilst I will support any woman, anywhere, in her struggle for recognition and emancipation, Greer points out that it isn't my job to tell her how to do it. The West has been doing that for far too long.
This isn't, to me, a book of answers. It's a book of questions which I haven't heard asked before. My greatest problem with Greer is that I still find her somewhat dismissive of men. After all, men are our lovers and our sons, and I think few women want that to change. But she reminds us that we have a long way to go in reconstructing our society and redefining the gender roles within it to improve life for men and women.
To all those twenty year olds out there: our mothers did a hell of a lot for us. We owe it to them to do a hell of a lot more!!!
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An Interesting but flawed book., 23 May 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Whole Woman (Hardcover)
Well this is a hard book to review. I got it because I saw a program about Greer and it's imminent release. Since I have been chatting with a feminist friend I thought I would see what I guessed was a feminist "leader" had to say. The book is basically a series of essays on various aspects of modern society. Some chapters are quite good some are appallingly bad. They are all very negative and have little suggestion as to what should be done to remedy the problems outlined. I started off thinking the book good. Then as no solutions were suggested and Greer repeatedly took two partially true statements and combined them in her lines of thinking to make ridiculous assumptions about men I started getting fed up with her and wondered what had happened to the seemingly intelligent and well thought out person portrayed on TV. I stuck with the book and again found chapters full of common sense (but still negative as no doubt a woman's life can be) and I thought perhaps the book will come up with some suggestions at the end. In fact it did in the final chapter a long time after a lot of people might have given up on her. I noticed a couple of times the books is written to a female audience (although it is full with interesting but blatantly biased Statistics). It also mentioned that feminists spend a long time arguing about their philosophies with each other. It struck me this book would achieve more if it had been better aimed at both sexes. If it put me, a liberal minded male, off at times there is no way she will change the males she really wants to get through to and educate. She just looks like a moaning woman and the book is worth a lot more than that.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "IT'S TIME TO GET ANGRY AGAIN", 5 Jun. 2000
By 
This review is from: The Whole Woman (Hardcover)
Excellent! A well written book that as well as being historically informative gives women the tools and understanding to "turn and fight". It gives a cold insight into the world that women live in today, it is harsh and unforgiving but i wouldn't expect anything less from Germaine Greer. This book made me cry, it also made me laugh, most of all it made me strong. I recommend that every woman should read this book and keep it in place of her bible.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Breath of Fresh Air., 30 April 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Whole Woman (Hardcover)
The Whole woman represents a welcome break from the endless psycho-babble surrounding women's, and indeed everyone else's, issues; by the smoking pen of one who has obviously been there, done that and bought the venerial disease cream. Call me biased,I first read the 'Female Eunuch' aged twelve and have been a raging lesbian feminist ever since (hold that, strike the lesbian bit), but if this isn't the new feminist text-book I'll eat my dungarees. However, if you are looking for a scienific study you will be disappointed, as I was, to find that Greer's scienific accuracy falls notably short of her socio-political analysis - perhaps the result of too long spent in the library and not long enough in the lab, Germaine ? Still, if you are looking for something to pass the commercial break (between Spice-Girls in concert and TOTP), you might like to have a look at her striking attack on 'grrl'-power, then go and do something constructive, like buying her other books for example. All in all a well argued case, and one more sheep back to the feminist fold.
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7 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A revolution of thought; provocative and unapologetic, 3 Feb. 2003
This review is from: The Whole Woman (Paperback)
I thoroughly enjoyed this work; the first of Greer's I have read. The introduction to feminism left me refreshed and redefined my ideas of myself, my role in society and the defnitions of what it is to be a woman. Greer is angry, direct and forceful, reaffirming her ideas with often witty, sometimes disturbing and always effective and thought provoking facts, figures and quotations giving the work an added depth and dimension. My only criticism would be that the unrelenting aggresive tone of the text does not make light reading, but given the subject matter perhaps this is fitting. I would recommend this book specifically to any woman looking for an affirmation of self and an excuse to 'man-bash'!
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The Whole Woman
The Whole Woman by Germaine Greer (Paperback - 1 Feb. 2007)
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