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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mary Soames book
What an excellent book, my partner enjoyed it immensely. Well written and easy to read it is full of fascinating information about the Churchill children growing up and their life in peace and war time. Honest and straightforward about the family divorces and difficulties. Thoroughly recommended.
Published on 4 Nov. 2011 by Mrs. Jessica M. Ruggles

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Trifle Bitty
Quite a nice book, with Mary Soames providing a different (and often fascinating) viewpoint of her charismatic father, Winston Churchill.

The book is a trifle bitty at times, and some of her diary extracts could easily have been incorporated into the narrative and although the reader is informed at a very early stage of the book of her fluency in French, some...
Published 14 months ago by Mr. R. D. M. Kirby


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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mary Soames book, 4 Nov. 2011
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What an excellent book, my partner enjoyed it immensely. Well written and easy to read it is full of fascinating information about the Churchill children growing up and their life in peace and war time. Honest and straightforward about the family divorces and difficulties. Thoroughly recommended.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Daughter's Tale, 8 Oct. 2011
By 
Nathan Garrison "Historian" (Georgia) - See all my reviews
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An excellent read about a father who was one of the greatest statesmen ever, and her mother who was a very special woman in her own right. The deep love and compassion Lady Soames had for her parents is so evident and heart-warming. The tales of her days in the service of her country added new insights to her as a person who was equally as proud of her country and its people as was her father.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A world of privilege and elitism, 29 July 2013
This review is from: A Daughter's Tale: The Memoir of Winston and Clementine Churchill's youngest child (Paperback)
I found this book interesting and irritating at the same time. Yes it was interesting to hear the authors perspective of the war years but I'm quite sure the banquets and parties she attended during this time bore no relation to the experience of most people in Britain struggling to get by on rations. I couldn't help but get the impression that her mother , who was constantly swanning off on cruises and foreign holidays for months at a time , hardly took any notice of Mary until she was about 16 when the penny dropped that she was closer to her nanny than to her own mother. When they hit what Mary describes 'lean times' as being when they turned off the heating in some of the rooms in their mansion and tried to drink less wine , they even wrote to tell mummie about it because she was off skiing in st moritz at the time ! Clearly she hasn't a clue what lean times really are and this at a time when people were living in terrible slums in Britain. It never seems to occur to the privileged that downsizing and getting a job could be an option ! I'm certainly no left wing socialist but I did find the fairytale elitist bubble that the author lived in very irritating and interesting at the same time.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable memoir by Winston Churchill's daughter, 30 Dec. 2011
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Mary (Lady) Soames, treads an interesting path between a fascinating insight into her father as a family man and her own practical experiences of the war years. Both are dealt with in an exceptionally warm and readable manner. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in Churchill the man, or in nostalgia for the war period generally. However, it also acts as an interesting historical document, based, as it seems to be, on Lady Soames's contemporary diaries from the time that is dealt with in the book.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tererrific personaL account, 13 Oct. 2011
By 
John H. Mather (Bowie, MD USA) - See all my reviews
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This book has been anticipated for a long time from Lady Soames. It is an engrossing and delightful read. I hope she is able to finish the rest of the story of her later years after her marriage to Lord Christopher Soames.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Trifle Bitty, 12 Dec. 2013
This review is from: A Daughter's Tale: The Memoir of Winston and Clementine Churchill's youngest child (Paperback)
Quite a nice book, with Mary Soames providing a different (and often fascinating) viewpoint of her charismatic father, Winston Churchill.

The book is a trifle bitty at times, and some of her diary extracts could easily have been incorporated into the narrative and although the reader is informed at a very early stage of the book of her fluency in French, some of the often overlong quotations in French in the text are really unnecessary.

But these are minor criticisms; Mary Soames gives a very interesting account of her father's war work (as well as her own) which makes this a very readable book. However, I was somewhat surprised when just the last two pages of the book were devoted to her marriage to Christopher Soames, the fact that they had five children and undoubtedly lived happily ever after - bang - just like that! A little judicious editing, including the rest of her father's life, plus the life that she and Lord Soames had together would have produced a far better ending.

If Mary Soames does write another book incorporating those matters, I'd very much like to read it.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Daughter's Tale, 22 May 2012
By 
Mr. HP Bennett (UK) - See all my reviews
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This is a fascinating memoir of a very different world. Mary Soames - at a very tender age - had a front seat at some of the most crucial events of WW2 as she served as ADC to her father. She clearly did not attend the conferences but she supported her father and met many of the big names of the war - President Roosevelt, Monty, Eisenhower and her memoir tells the tale in a very readable and affectionate way. Her description of growing up at Chartwell is a fascinating cameo of a lost world.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Eye-witness to history..., 14 Sept. 2014
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This is a memoir / part-autobiography of Winston and Clementine Churchill’s youngest child Mary from her birth in 1922 to her marriage in 1947. The memoir focuses almost entirely on her father’s political career, with particular emphasis on his crucial and pivotal role as Prime Minister in WW2. This is viewed from first a domestic and later participatory perspective, after Mary joins the army and is occasionally summoned to travel with her father as an aide.

It is full of insights into the workings of the Churchill family, her love and respect for her father, how after an uneasy start she grew very close to her mother, and her determination to do something for the war effort herself, when so easily she might have been little more than an onlooker. Her pride in Winston’s achievements and anguish when he falls ill, or things are going badly is plainly on view. Her aching sadness when he loses the first post-war election is tangible, and the more moving for being related dispassionately.

Mary’s relationship with friends, relatives, and household staff – who usually were also seen as friends – is described in personal terms and often includes vignettes direct from her diaries. Family pets get a mention, and the passages describing how the family bends over backwards to ensure the comfort of a remarkable cat are a delight. Internal family disputes, often vitriolic, are also recalled. Many major public figures of the time are described, and we are rarely left in doubt about Mary’s opinion of them.
The style is elegant and economical. The author conveys meaning with a minimum number of words, and as such many passages might be text book examples of the art of writing. Guest lists and entries in visiting books are often reproduced, and unavoidably some are quite repetitive.

I found this a gripping, entertaining and often moving excursion into how a family with a strong sense of duty chose to exercise it. It is a well illustrated valuable historical archive and a moving description of love, disappointment, failure, and success in one of the most famous and celebrated households of the 20th century.

It is also a very good and special read.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very interesting tale by a very interesting lady!, 28 Sept. 2011
By 
S. MOHAMADI (London,SW) - See all my reviews
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What a beautiful and stunning memoir! I have always been fascinated by the eventful and highly prolific life of Winston Churchill and this private memoir is another powerful reminder of his legacy, his place in the 20th century and his continued significance to the present day. A very personal account of a very public figure. You would also come to realise Mary didn't live under her father's shadow and went on to live a fruitful and enriching life in the mist of those dreadful circumstances.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Churchill's youngest daughter, 8 Dec. 2011
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I was interested to read this as my mother served with the ATS during the 2nd World War climbing to the
ranks of Captain (and was asked to stay on, but not her thing)to gain an insight into the type of work that
she would have been involved in. WC's youngest daughter can only be commended for doing her bit during the war,
she would probably not have been allowed not to, given who her father was. Even in wartime social life carries on
and it was quite a revelation to me the number of social dates be it theatre/dinner/parties that carried on under
the circumstances and food seems to have been plentiful and good too!! Also, an insight into the close knit family
that surrounded WC at all times, the usual ups and downs, but a very warm relationship between her and her parents
given the sadness of the loss of an earlier sibling.
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