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90 Reviews
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Oh Mummy!
Pyramids (The Book of Going Forth) is Terry Pratchett's 7th Discworld novel, and continues the trend of changing the series from a satire of the fantasy genre into a distorted mirror of our own world. The main inspiration here is quite obviously ancient Egypt, with the returning heir to the throne of Djelibeybi (ouch!) getting involved in a plot which involves the return...
Published on 21 Jan 2005 by Jane Aland

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best, not the worst
My star rating should be considered in the light of the fact that I love Terry Pratchett books. The rating takes into account the need to distinguish between my favourites and others. My problem is that I've not been reading the books in any sort of order and once I'd discovered Sam Vimes and the Watch, Granny Weatherwax and the Witches and the Wee Frees I've tended to...
Published on 4 Oct 2009 by Mr. J. Creevey


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3.0 out of 5 stars Another good Discworld novel!, 24 Feb 2009
By 
This Discworld novel follows Teppic as he trains as an assassin (yep, I thought that was funny too) and then becomes king of the pyramid country that is Djelibeybi (pronouced De- Jelly-Baby, another that made me laugh). The problem beginnings when Teppic has to build a pyramid for his father, something they both think seems a ridiculous idea. The book sees exploding pyramids, crazy priests and gods going mad. And of course, a visit from Death.

So far, this has been the worst Discworld novel in my opinion. I felt it took a little while to get going, and there were some times I found myself tuning out. However, towards the end, the action picks up and it is fair to say the book is exciting and hilarious. It was definitely worth persevering for.

As ever, Pratchett transported me to a different area of the Discworld, and I was happy to go. The descriptions were such that I could clearly picture the area and the characters were as funny as usual. My favourite was probably Teppic's father, as he watched himself being mummified and listening to him chat to people who couldn't hear him. His journey of self-discovery in death was very humorous.

Although I eventually enjoyed this book, it has not been my favourite. However, I am eager to get to the next one in the series.

7/10
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5.0 out of 5 stars They just keep getting better!!!!, 6 Feb 2009
By 
P. Foster "Weird Fish" (Kent, UK) - See all my reviews
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I have all of Terry Pratchetts Discworld books and love them dearly. Tony Robinson has brought them to life as only he could,my wife has got me several of the audio books as presents. They go everywhere with me on my ipod and I find myself laughing again and again. It makes a stuffed train carriage much more bearable plus you can read the paper whilst listening to an absolute comic classic!!!! suddenly the latest government taxation doesn't feel so bad or whatever other joy the papers throw at us first thing in the morning :)
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4.0 out of 5 stars Sun's Coming Up!!!!!, 19 Dec 2008
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read by Tony Robinson this is absolutely brilliant, he puts on several different voices to great effect and amusement. if your planning a long journey then this would be a superb edition to your CD collection
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5.0 out of 5 stars Some of the Best Fantasy Writing Ever, 19 April 2008
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Terry Pratchett has become one of the most popular authors alive today and his popularity is richly deserved. This book was first published in 1989. That means that the Discworld had been spinning around in Terry Pratchet's head for six years and all its avid readers are praying that the series does not end just yet. Little did they realise at the time that the series would still be going nearly 20 years later.

You would think that a fantasy world full of trolls, zombies, witches, vampires would be an alien concept to most readers. Werewolves and dwarves in the Ank Morpork city watch. Wizards running a university. Or with this particular book a country, similar in just about every grain of sand to Egypt. Pratchett's brain must have been working overtime on this one.

The author keeps his reader's laughing throughout the book with the story of how difficult it is being a teenage Pharoah Terry Pratchett gets a laugh out of just about anybody or anything you can think of that relates to Ancient Egypt. Pyramids, high priests, mummies that come to life. Pyramid builders that couldn`t build a brick s - - - house, sacred gods, you name it and it is there in this hilarious book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars its a terry pratchett book.......nuff said surely, 4 July 2005
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on of my all time favourite pratchett books, possibly due to the insight into the assasins guild and a new (or ancient if you like those kinds play on word thingies) addition to the discworld big book of story locations. its basicly a brilliant book that would also stand alone for those new to all things discworldian, pteppic is also new to anchmorpork so ya wont be any worse off than him.
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4.0 out of 5 stars it's er.....different, 23 Feb 2000
By A Customer
I enjoyed this book as much as the others but I don't think this is the best. the other books are all inkeeping with a certain style of writing, (for lack of a better phrase, terry pratchetty)but this is very different even though it still uses the same settings, ie the disc, anch-morpork, the assasins guild, but even though I don't think he's done anything like it before I would still recommend it. But not as the first one you read out of the series. I think you have to be an established fan before you read this.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars pyramids review, 11 Feb 2006
By A Customer
Pyramids is an imaginative thriller.In Pyramids King Teppicymon XXVII,or Teppic to his friends and Ptraci the serving girl have to deal with mad high priests,incompetent pyramid builders,the Great Pyramid exploding,sphinxes,assassins,wooden horses,marching mummies,Hat the vulture-headed god of unexpected guests,and dreams about seven fat cows and seven thin cows(one of whom is playing a trombone) .If you enjoy reading sci-fi or fantasy novels then try Terry Prattchett's discworld series.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A tale of Teppic's travails, 30 Jun 2005
By 
Stephen A. Haines (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
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"Heavy hangs the head" goes the old saying. Teppic doesn't wear a crown, but there's plenty else. Besides all the gear he took up while training to be an Assassin in Ankh-Morpork, there's The Reaping Hook of Justice, The Sheaf of Plenty and The Three-pronged Spear of the Waters of the Earth. Oh, yes, there's also a gold mask for identity. All this has been imposed on Teppic since ascending the throne of Djelibeybi at the death of his father. Along with the paraphenalia, Teppic has also inherited a staggering, if unspecified, debt load. In Djelibebi, each monarch is to "rest" in a pyramid, each one larger than that of his/her predecessor. With seven millennia of monarchs, the shores of the River Djel are occupied with these man-made stone mountains. And nobody can remember how long it's been since any of them was paid for.
Teppic, having breathed the foetid air of Anhk-Morpork, misses feather mattresses and plumbing. He is also suspicious of the type of "justice" prevailing in Djelibeybi. Long centuries of "tradition" have conditioned the populace to endure bizaare forms of justice. So conditioned that they will self-inflict punishment, no matter how illogical. Teppic has difficulty understanding this, but Dios, his high priest is there to counsel him on how the system works. There's also another voice, just at the level of perception, addiing to Teppic's uncertainty. Urged by Dios to build the greatest pyramid ever to honour Teppic's departed father, the new king has reservations. Something is telling him it's a bad idea.
The bad idea proves worse than he can imagine. The ranks of pyramids contain the fourth dimension, Time, which can distort the other three if enough accumulates. Events transpire, not the least of which is the disappearance of Djelibeybi, river, pyramids and all. This situation allows Pratchett to make his first drastic departure from the image of "humourous fanticist" pinned on him by uncomprehending critics. He does so with gusto. Employing the assistance of the Discworld's greatest mathematician [not a dolphin!], Pratchett guides us through the world of quantum physics. Far from fantasy, this is serious science brought to life by the one writer who can accomplish it with such finesse. Who but Pratchett could utilise the metaphor of Djelibeybi stretching like "a lead ball on a rubber sheet" in such a context?
What happens when Time distorts the other dimensions? If you're outside, how do you return? If you're inside, what effect will the transformation of those dimensions mean to reality? What will be reality? Pratchett answers those questions in ways that will astound fans of fantasy and confound physics professors who seek ways of awakening their legions of drowsy students. He formulates a new reality in which those things we believe in but never see are given substance. Will we still believe in them when they confront us? How will we cope with the forces they possess? Pratchett poses these questions to prod us into considering them for ourselves. Can you accept his challenge? Read this as a guidebook to the world beyond "reality" and enjoy the immense wit Pratchett uses to describe it. You won't be disappointed. [stephen a. haines - Ottawa, Canada]
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sorry, Dissapointing!, 26 Aug 2011
By 
B. Vallance "vallance24" (Greece) - See all my reviews
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The Discworld series is outstanding. But they all cannot be a good as each other. "Pyramids" is rather disappointing.
In the Discworld Universe, the Magicks and Physics are notable by their consistency. This one does not. It engages in highly complex multi-dimensional physics where it, really, shouldn't be and completely out of touch with the rest of the novels.

I suppose there had to be a poor one in all Pratchett's vast Discworld output. Unfortunately, this is it.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Terrific Fantasy Writing, 12 Jan 2008
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Terry Pratchett has become one of the most popular authors alive today and his popularity is richly deserved. This book was first published in 1989. That means that the Discworld had been spinning around in Terry Pratchet's head for six years and all its avid readers are praying that the series does not end just yet. Little did they realise at the time that the series would still be going nearly 20 years later.

You would think that a fantasy world full of trolls, zombies, witches, vampires would be an alien concept to most readers. Werewolves and dwarves in the Ank Morpork city watch. Wizards running a university. Or with this particular book a country, similar in just about every grain of sand to Egypt. Pratchett's brain must have been working overtime on this one.

The author keeps his reader's laughing throughout the book with the story of how difficult it is being a teenage Pharoah Terry Pratchett gets a laugh out of just about anybody or anything you can think of that relates to Ancient Egypt. Pyramids, high priests, mummies that come to life. Pyramid builders that couldn`t build a brick s - - - house, sacred gods, you name it and it is there in this hilarious book.
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Pyramids: (Discworld Novel 7) (Discworld Novels)
Pyramids: (Discworld Novel 7) (Discworld Novels) by Terry Pratchett (Paperback - 11 Oct 2012)
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