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31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Pratchett's best
This is one of my all-time favourite Pratchett books. Everything that he's good at is exhibited here - adapting stories and fairy tales, "translating" real life culture to the Discworld, great characterisation and dialogue, a great plot - and, of course, it's hilariously funny.
If you're a fan of the Witches, it's even better. Granny Weatherwax,...
Published on 3 Mar. 2006 by barenakedlady

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Once upon a time....
The witches go on holiday and try to put a stop to some out of control fairy stories.

I can't say I'm much of a fan of Pratchett's witch stories, Granny Weatherwax makes for a fairly unpleasant lead whilst Nanny Ogg provides the comedy and Magrat provides the ....well I'm not sure what she brings to be honest.

This book is at its best on the journey...
Published on 28 Jan. 2013 by Amazon Customer


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply wonderful, 26 Jun. 2002
By 
Sigrķšur (Reykjavķk Iceland) - See all my reviews
Wiches abroad is one of Prathchett's funniest, wittiest and altogether most clever books. I loved it, and I laughed myself to tears. It really gives tourism a new perspective. Not to mention fairy godmothers. Granny Weatherwax is delightfully grumpy and pruny and in the end we get to learn a bit about her history... A simply must read!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mirror,Mirror,On The Wall....., 27 Feb. 2011
By 
L. Tait (scotland) - See all my reviews
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So, the stars of 'Wyrd Sisters' are back! Granny Weatherwax and co are once more setting out to save a kingdom from a fairy Godmother who is too good for her own good! This story tells of their adventures along the way,staying at dubious taverns,meeting werewolves,and revealing the real little red riding hood! Many references are made throughout to conventional fairy stories, and as usual, Pratchett waves his satirical wand to create another rather novel,er,novel! Will Emberella marry the not so handsome prince? Will the witches win? I'm not going to tell you! But what I can guarantee is that you'll laugh a fair bit and praise Pratchett for another clever reworking of another genre of literature which has become so firmly entrenched,it needed a bit of a comedic lift. Highly recommended!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Witchcraft and the Narrative Imperative..., 12 Dec. 1999
Witches Abroad is the first Discworld novel to really explore the driving force of the Disc and its inhabitants: Narrative Imperative, the theory that stories use their characters like soccer players use a ball. This idea, combined with Pratchet's uncanny ability to put real people in such fantastic settings presents not only a ripping good story to bring a smile to the most serious face, but also makes you wonder about the purpose of 'Being' itself. Let's face it, it would be lovely to believe we're all players in a bigger story than just the random events that life seems to hurl at us. Pratchet once again not only makes you laugh, but he makes you think and feel as well.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Ever Terry Pratchett Book, 14 April 2003
By A Customer
I've read almot all of Terry Pratchett's books and this is definitely the best so far. The plot is incredibly well thought-out and the endings is both unexpected and ingenious. The story still carries the Terry Pratchett humour that we have all come to know and love. Some new characters are introduced, including Granny Weatherwax's sister and the voodoo woman, both of whom have intriguing stories behind theuir mysterious lives. The novel is really easy to get into and once you've picked it up, you won't be able to put it down until it's finished. Its blurb doesn't really prmote the novel very much, but take it from me, Witches Abroad is worth every penny!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Progress just means bad things happen faster, 21 Aug. 2003
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
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For me, the Discworld is never as much fun as when I have Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg, and Magrat Garlick as my chaperones, and Witches Abroad is a truly seminal work starring my three favorite witches. This is a story about stories, and on the anthropomorphic wonderland known as the Discworld stories are so powerful that they can become almost unstoppable forces; they are so important that they shape people rather than the other way around, making people do things for the sake of the stories alone. Once a story gets going, it's almost impossible to stop it. You don't tell Granny Weatherwax that anything is impossible for her to do, though, nor do you tell her you need her help, not unless you don't want her to come. The fairy godmother Desiderata knows this, although she is not particularly adept at training a successor (and since witches know when they are going to die, her death is no excuse for such lack of planning). Just before she dies, she wraps up her magic wand and sends it to Magrat Garlick, Lancre's youngest, most good-hearted, tradition-obsessed, open-minded, overlooked witch along with a note telling her appointed successor that she must go to Genua to prevent the girl Emberella from marrying the prince and that she must tell Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg that they are not to come with her. Thus, all three witches are soon flying away from their homes in Lancre in route to the eastern port of Genua. Their journey finds them bumping headlong into a number of different stories, Pratchett-twisted episodes such as one involving a young girl in a red cape, her grandmother, and a wolf. It soon becomes obvious to the three witches that someone is making stories come true, but only Granny secretly knows just who is behind all this. Arriving in Genua, they are exposed to the city's own brand of magic, namely voodoo, run up against snake sisters guarding poor Emberella, delight in an entirely new kind of cooking (the ingredients of which are kept from Granny for the most part, which is obviously quite the right thing to do), and set out to stop the warped Cinderella-based fairy tale events surrounding Emberella, knowing that, should Emberella marry the prince, the other fairy godmother (they come in pairs, incidentally), the witch wielding and invigorating her power by the use of mirror magic, would have power over the whole city and force her happy endings on everyone in town. There's nothing wrong with happy endings, but being made happy against one's wishes and knowledge is one of very many things that Granny doesn't hold with. As Magrat's attempts to use the magic wand result in only pumpkins and more pumpkins, success in this unexpected tour of fairy godmothering duty requires all three witches working together, and Granny herself needs all of her skills at headology when she confronts an important figure from her past.
The ingeniously satirical incorporation of fairy tales by Pratchett makes this book worth its weight in gold, but it is the constant bickering and resulting comedy between the three very different witches that makes this book so entertaining. There is no citizen of the Discworld whom I find as fascinating and entertaining as good old Granny Weatherwax. Her obstinacy and refusal to admit a deficiency of any kind is quite comical in and of itself, but put this beside poor Magrat's idealized notions and unconventional ideas (such as her decision to wear pants and thus, to Granny's horror, let men see where her legs are underneath them) and Nanny's ribald, good-natured humor and zest for life (and alcohol and dirty songs, etc.) and you've got a recipe for high comedy indeed. Nanny's unique cat Greebo also takes on vast importance in this novel, offering us yet another unforgettable travel partner in this strange world of Pratchett's ingenious creation. Granny's character is especially well-developed in this novel, and the new-found insights into her childhood offer quite a telling new insight into her personality. Witches Abroad is among the best of the best of Pratchett's Discworld series.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Witches Road Trip, 17 July 2010
By 
T. R. Alexander (East Anglia, UK) - See all my reviews
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When Magrat Garlick inherits the wand of a fairy godmother she has to travel to the far of city of Genua to make sure a servant girl doesn't marry the prince. Accompanying her on her trip across the Disc are Nanny Ogg, Greebo and Granny Weather and it turns out the trip is far more personal for Granny than she suspected.

`Witches Aboard' is another Discworld book that I didn't really like when I first read it but now I have read it again years later I enjoyed it a lot more and would probably say that it is now one of my favourite of all the Witches books. The novel includes some very funny references and deconstructions of various books, films and fairy tails. Granny Weatherwax is easily the best part of the book but Greebo is a close second and is probably one of the best cat characters from any series.

This book was really entertaining, if a bit short, and it is well worth the full five stars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars pratchett fan, 22 July 2013
By 
Mrs. Deborah L. Ankrett (Nottm UK) - See all my reviews
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bought this and lots of other pratchett books when got my first kindle so could read as liked. All the older books haven't read for a while and can not afford the prices for the hard backs (from middle to latest have a hardback collection). Took great pleasure in re-reading this again. The magic is still there and he's still the only author that keeps me glued to page chuckling away. If you haven't read a Pratchett novel before then buy one quick and be prepared for whole other world of entertainment.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 16 Feb. 2013
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I've lost count of how many times I've read this book now.

It's like an old friend always ready to welcome you back.

It's one of Pratchetts finest in my opinion
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Once upon a time...., 28 Jan. 2013
By 
Amazon Customer (Epsom, Surrey United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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The witches go on holiday and try to put a stop to some out of control fairy stories.

I can't say I'm much of a fan of Pratchett's witch stories, Granny Weatherwax makes for a fairly unpleasant lead whilst Nanny Ogg provides the comedy and Magrat provides the ....well I'm not sure what she brings to be honest.

This book is at its best on the journey as the three witches deal with the aftereffects of various fairy stories along with the strangeness of foreign parts. Once the destination is reached, things slow down and ultimately everything gets wrapped up fairly quickly and with no great drama.

I didn't hate the book, but I don't think it's one of the best of the discworld novels.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Witches Abroad, 10 Jan. 2013
By 
Keen Reader "lhendry4" (Auckland, New Zealand) - See all my reviews
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This is one of the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett; this one involves the three witches, Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg and Magrat Garlick. Magrat has been bequeathed fairy godmothering duties (along with a wand) and heads off to help her fairy godchild (?); helped (or something resembling it) by Granny and Nanny.

This is not, to my way of thinking, one of the better Discworld novels; mildly amusing generally, a bit confusing in parts, and one which doesn't really seem to involve the witches to their best advantage. Even though they are in the book from beginning to end, a lot of the story seems to happen around and in spite of them; I'm not sure what it was about it, but it just didn't seem to tickle my funny bone as much as the Discworld novels usually do. Great, but not fantastic.
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Witches Abroad: (Discworld Novel 12) (Discworld Novels)
Witches Abroad: (Discworld Novel 12) (Discworld Novels) by Terry Pratchett (Paperback - 1 Aug. 2005)
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