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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Where it all starts!
From habit, I like to read series books in order so I started at 'Colour of Magic'. I bought the book rather the borrowed it.
COM is broken up into 4 novelettes. The story is about Rincewind, a cowardly, inept and absolutely endearing character; Twoflower (who is a 'Tourist' - some oddity never before seen on the Disc); and, The Luggage who's a forceful character in...
Published on 27 Nov. 2004 by tularip

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Don't give up
One of the best pieces of book advice I was ever given was from a friend who told me that if I wanted to read Discworld I should do so from the beginning and in chronological order, but that I shouldn't stop if I was less than impressed with the first couple of books. Luckily I followed her advice.

The Colour of Magic is far from a great novel. Flashes of...
Published on 8 Mar. 2010 by Oracle


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Start of the Best Fantasy Series Ever, 15 Mar. 2008
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Terry Pratchett has become one of the most popular authors alive today and his popularity is richly deserved. But not even with his fertile mind could ever have envisaged the heights to which his Discworld series would rise. The Colour of Magic was first published in 1982 and is the start of the Discworld novels. To a degree it is amazing that these books have achieved such popularity but they certainly have and they are probably the most read fantasy books in the world.

You would think that a fantasy world full of trolls, zombies, witches, vampires would be an alien concept to most readers. Werewolves and dwarves in the Ankh Morpork city watch. Wizards running a university. All this to come in future episodes. Surely this style of writing would have a limited readership? but no the books are loved by anybody and everybody and are read by people who would not normally allow fantasy fiction on to their book shelves. This is the Discworld of terry Pratchett.

This first book in the series is about a wizard who is plagued by spells that don't always work and if they do, they do not always achieve the ends he had in mind. His meeting with Twoflower a 'tourist' makes for hilarious reading.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very clever silliness, 17 May 2005
By 
A. Wasenczuk "speedbird2" (Hampshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Colour Of Magic: (Discworld Novel 1) (Discworld Novels) (Paperback)
This is Pratchett's first novel and my personal favourite. Why? Because this is the one in which he takes a pop at the entire fantasy genre. The style of humour is Douglas Adams (with a nod to Tom Sharpe in the character of Rincewind) but the target is different. Like Adams, Pratchett has many imitators but this is the original and the best.
Pratchett's world is a flat disc on the back of four elephants standing on an enormous turtle, swimming between the stars. It's populated almost entirely by magicians, peasants, armed lunatics and petty deities. If you're in the 90% of the population who think that this sounds like a recipe for disaster, then you'll love it.
The trick, I think, is that the best jokes are quite subtle. Some of them you might not notice the first time round. And Pratchett is one of the few authors who can write a sight-gag. For this we must applaud him.
Belly-laughs for all ages. Occasionally, days later in the middle of the high street.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a Beginning to the Series, 8 Dec. 2007
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Terry Pratchett has become one of the most popular authors alive today and his popularity is richly deserved. But not even with his fertile mind could ever have envisaged the heights to which his Discworld series would rise. This book first published in 1982 is the start of the Discworld novels and to a degree it is amazing that these books have achieved such popularity.

You would think that a fantasy world full of trolls, zombies, witches, vampires would be an alien concept to most readers. Werewolves and dwarves in the Ankh Morpork city watch. Wizards running a university. All this to come in future episodes. Surely this style of writing would have a limited readership? but no the books are loved by anybody and everybody and are read by people who would not normally allow fantasy fiction on to their book shelves. This is the Discworld of terry Pratchett.

This first book in the series is about a wizard whois plagued by spells that don't always work and if they do, they do not always achieve the ends he had in mind. His meeting with Twoflower a 'tourist' makes for hilarious reading.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Creative but disappointing, 31 Oct. 2010
I rarely read books on the basis that someone says "you really should read this," preferring to find my own taste. When a friend told me that reading Terry Pratchett reminded him of listening to me, however, this appealed to my vanity and I bought "The Colour of Magic". Reading it reminds me why I'm not a published author.

It's not a dreadful book: there are a few humorous lines, the scenarios are highly creative and parts of the storylines are technically well crafted. It's just not a particularly great book, either. There is no character development and little character. The two main protagonists are simple caricatures: Rincewind is cowardly but quick-witted; Twoflower is naive and curious. The characters are not rounded enough for us to care much about what happens to them. When they are in mortal danger (as they often are) we aren't really too bothered whether they live or die (although when you're only part way through the first story you have a fairly good idea that they're not actually for the chop, quite yet). The cliff-hangers themselves become wearisome, too, with our "heroes" facing certain death until something unexpectedly snatches them from their perilous situation only for another to develop before they are unexpectedly snatched away only for another...

The other disappointment, for me, was the writing style and language. Although the writing is very competent and Pratchett's vocabulary wide, the writing never really comes alive and fizzes and crackles with comic brilliance the way, say, P G Wodehouse's did. It is far from unreadable but there is no particular joy in reading it.

If you are thinking about reading this book, I'd reccommend borrowing a copy from the library. If you enjoy it then you're in luck: there are thirty-five more "Discworld" books to follow. If you don't really enjoy it, you won't have wasted your money.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good start to an iconic series, 29 Sept. 2009
By 
Who hasn't heard of Terry Pratchett's Discworld books? They're one of the biggest selling British fantasy series in print and during the nineties the a string of top ten Sunday Times bestsellers made Pratchett the UK's biggest selling author. All of this begs the question: why haven't I read any before now? It's a good one too and I honestly can't answer it. Still, I've now seen the error of my ways and started the Discworld books where they all began: The Colour of Magic.

I knew that the Discworld books were fantasy with humour, but I really didn't appreciate what that meant until I started reading The Colour of Magic. From the first meetings with Rincewind, the wizard, and Twoflower, the tourist, I knew that there was going to be something special about the book. The way that the characters are instantly likable makes the book such a blast to read. The adventures we follow Rincewind and Twoflower on is an excellent way to introduce the reader to the many wonders of the Discworld.

The main premise of this particular story is that Twoflower is the first tourist of Discworld and that Rincewind has been tasked (albeit not entirely voluntarily) with his protection. We follow Twoflower as he wants to see the sights and events of the city of Ankh-Morpork along with anywhere else he can go. With the initial stages set to character and, to an extent, worldbuilding, we get to see many interesting things and start to get a good feel for the world. Pratchett is able to convey the information in such a way that it doesn't feel like a chore in any way and that we have a good chuckle while he does so.

Once the events move away from the city the book takes on a broader and more traditional fantasy adventure, although with two characters that seem not to know what exactly they're doing in any given situation. I enjoyed the pace of these events and the many wonderful things that Pratchett introduces. However, it got to a point where the story skipped forward six months and I felt completely out of kilter from then on. What was building up to be a really enjoyable book suddenly took a downturn and, ultimately, bought the book down a notch or two from what it could have been.

In general I enjoyed The Colour of Magic, although the pacing issue in the second half affected how much the enjoyment was. I'm very eager to read more in the Discworld series and hope that Pratchett can build successfully upon these promising beginnings - something I keep hearing he has done very well!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful fantasy world, 10 Dec. 2008
By 
Synopsis from Amazon:

It is fantasy? No - it's a different and more eccentric reality, where the world is flat and moves through space on the back of a giant turtle, Death stalks glumly about his duties, and dragons only exist if you believe in them. And your luggage follows you around on hundreds of little legs...

Follow Twoflower the naïve tourist and his inept guide Rincewind in their hilarious search for thrills, adventure and opportunities to not get killed. Follow them all the way to the Edge - and beyond...

This is the first Pratchett novel I have read, and I am glad I did, what a funny book!

Pratchett leads us through a fantastical world filled with gods, dragons, trolls and the like. This book was not a disappointment. Everything was described in such a way that it was easy to imagine and be transported there.

I loved Twoflower, I found his character hilarious. Pretty much all he did and said was funny. My other favourite character was Death. He had some great one-liners.

My only problem with the book was there were so many events and adventures and characters I slowly forgot who was who and what had happened before. However, this didn't really spoil the story for me.

The end is nicely set up for the next in the series, and I am looking forward to carrying on the adventure :-)

8/10
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good start, but not the best, 13 Mar. 2012
As a lifelong Pratchett fan it pains me to say it, but I have never enjoyed this book as much as its successors. It is fun throughout and in places funny, but the tongue-in-cheek humour and the razor sharp satire that so characterise this series is in short supply, while the story is far less focused than his later work. That said, this book does neatly turn the fantasy genre on its head and set the stage for the greater things to come, while supplying some nice moments. Ironically not the best starting place for those seeking entry to the canon, but a worthwhile read and a auspicious beginning.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining, 16 Aug. 2012
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The Colour Of Magic is my first toe-dipping into the Discworld novels. Being the first one, I thought it a good place to start. I had no problem immersing myself into the chaotic and imaginative world that Pratchett conjures up, which admittedly, had been a concern. I needn't have worried (much). It is a well written piece of work, delightfully detailed, with a good story too.

I'm not a huge reader of fantasy, yet I found this very easy to whizz through, wasn't bored or feeling disinclined to travel 'Rimward' with him to the end. However, I did feel some of the physics of the world to be a stretch too far, and felt it added little other than being a tad distracting; illogical for the sake of it. Perhaps it is part of the seeds that are being sown for latter works, I wasn't sure.

I can certainly see the appeal and interest surrounding the Discworld series. It's not a brilliant book, granted, and indeed - according to other reviews I've read - not the best example of the Discworld...er...world, but I would certainly recommend giving it a go. Even if only for the moments when Pratchett (skilfully) pokes his head through the curtains just to let you know he's there. That made me smile.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Loved it!, 13 Feb. 2006
By 
Kurt A. Johnson (North-Central Illinois, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is the very first book in Terry Pratchett's series on the Discworld - a flat world, supported on the backs of four massive elephants riding on the back of a planet-sized turtle. Anything hilarious can happen here, and eventually does.
Rincewind the (failed) wizard's luck seems to be looking up. He has fallen in with the Discworld's very first tourist, and man is he packing the gold. But, as per usual, things begin to go bad and then worse. It seems that the gods are playing a game, and Rincewind and the tourist are pawns. It's fate versus luck, but does Rincewind have any chance of winning? The results will definitely be...hilarious!
This is a very good book, one that has a few differences from later stories, but definitely has that old Terry Pratchett magic. Now, be advised that this book has a cliffhanger ending; you really have to move on immediately to the sequel, The Light Fantastic. As for me, I really liked this book. When my fourteen-year-old daughter discovered the joy Terry Pratchett for herself (after reading The Wee Free Men!), I immediately got her this book, so she could read the Discworld series in order. We both love this book and highly recommend it!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a Start to the Series, 18 Jan. 2008
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Colour Of Magic: (Discworld Novel 1) (Discworld Novels) (Paperback)
Terry Pratchett has become one of the most popular authors alive today and his popularity is richly deserved. But not even with his fertile mind could ever have envisaged the heights to which his Discworld series would rise. This book first published in 1982 is the start of the Discworld novels and to a degree it is amazing that these books have achieved such popularity.

You would think that a fantasy world full of trolls, zombies, witches, vampires would be an alien concept to most readers. Werewolves and dwarves in the Ankh Morpork city watch. Wizards running a university. All this to come in future episodes. Surely this style of writing would have a limited readership? but no the books are loved by anybody and everybody and are read by people who would not normally allow fantasy fiction on to their book shelves. This is the Discworld of terry Pratchett.

This first book in the series is about a wizard whois plagued by spells that don't always work and if they do, they do not always achieve the ends he had in mind. His meeting with Twoflower a 'tourist' makes for hilarious reading.
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The Colour Of Magic: (Discworld Novel 1) (Discworld Novels)
The Colour Of Magic: (Discworld Novel 1) (Discworld Novels) by Terry Pratchett (Paperback - 1 April 2005)
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