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on 14 October 2005
Robert Langdon, the Harvard professor who is also the main character in The Da Vinci Code, is asked by the director of CERN, to help solve the murder of one of its scientists, an Italian priest annex physics wizard who is found dead with an eye missing and a mysterious symbol branded on his chest. At the same time a new technology that may lead to widespread destruction is stolen from CERN. Together with the adopted daughter of the priest Robert travels to Rome to try and solve the riddle that involves the infamous Illuminati brotherhood, a secret society seeking to destroy the Roman Catholic Church. Right at that moment the cardinals of the church are trying to elect a new pope and Robert and Vittoria chase the murderer around Rome in a race against the clock to prevent the annihilation of Vatican City. But all is not what it seems to be and the main danger comes from within Vatican City...

This book again contains the themes that made Dan Brown world famous: secret codes, ancient brotherhoods and a serious threat to mankind and its institutions. Not as good as the Da Vinci Code, but still a nice book to read that never gets dull.
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on 25 June 2012
My mother tongue is Italian and I must say I tried to read "Angels and Demons" in original for a while but, after a few pages, I had to stop and put it away as I just couldn't stand the naive plot and all those language mistakes and mispelling of Rome's street and place names! I'd already noticed some language and factual errors in Brown's other best selling novel "The Da Vinci Code" (just think of the title itself, in which he erroneously seems to believe Da Vinci is Leonardo's family name, when everyone knows that Leonardo "da Vinci" means he was "from Vinci", the tiny Tuscan village where the Great Man was supposed to be born!!!). Well, this book has got more mistakes than that and some of them even worse! What mostly irritates is the author pretending to be cool by setting his novels in real famous cities (Paris, Rome, London) maybe in order to give the story an aura of real life truth or whatever. The results often turn out to be so poor and pointless that one comes to think he'd better set his next novels in fictional places where no readers will be fooled by any inaccuracy.
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on 8 September 2011
Robert Langdon, a Harvard Professor and writer of books about symbology is contacted urgently by CERN. On the chest of a murdered scientist is the sign of the Illuminati, an old enemy of the Catholic Church believed to no longer exist.

Stolen anti matter from CERN is being held in Rome that is capable of destroying the city while the Cardinals are in the process of electing a new pope. Robert is joined by Vittoria Vectra, daughter of the murdered scientist as they attempt to save the city.

Robert and Vittoria must solve a series of clues and follow the path to a secret Illuminati hideout in Rome. However, there is a cruel killer using the same path murdering cardinals at each step of the way.

This is an exciting and fast paced story as Robert and Vittoria try to rediscover a long forgotten path in order to save Rome and stop cardinals being murdered. The story ends with a great twist as the mastermind behind the whole plot is revealed.

This is a great read, once you have started the book you will not be able to put it down. I would recommend this book to anyone.
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VINE VOICEon 19 April 2008
Robert Langdon a Harvard symbologist is woken in the middle of the night by a phone call that is going to change his life. This phone call may also change our lives.

Dan Brown weaves many story threads in to a tapestry of intrigue. The story takes place over a 24-hour period. A positive thing about this tale is that it is told in a linear fashion with very few flashbacks except when it is necessary for a back-story. In this story he treats Robert Langdon's character as if Langdon is not aware of many, well known technical items and theories; this may be true of Robert Langdon, but Dan Brown also irritatingly treats us as if we do not know these things!

On the surface, we are treated to a "who did it" and "will we get there in time" story. We must separate the goats from the sheep. However, we are also confronted with science versus religion. Is science and religion like oil and water or is science and religion just two of the facets of God?

The Da Vinci Code: A Novel by Dan Brown
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on 28 June 2009
I read this book a number of years ago, and now that it's a movie (and possibly due to the fact that the Da Vinci code was on TV recently) I thought I should try and articulate my thoughts on this phenomenon.
In short, it can be summarised as follows, I just don't get it!
Angels and Demons (like the Da Vinci code, lets leave the others out of this discussion) has an interesting start and central story...a historical conflict between science and religion, (the Illuminati and the Roman Catholic Church).
Ok so far, where I do have issues with D. Brown books is their endings, which are examples of where the author seems to have got tired with his book and decided that anything will do.
This annoys me as a reader, as just when I get into a book, a naff ending ruins it (the prime example of this in my opinion is Hannibal).
So in short, this is not the worst book I've ever read, but please lets be realistic and put Dan Brown's novels in perspective. They are mediocre summer reading, nothing more.....
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on 23 June 2003
Reading at times like a highly polished piece of pulp fiction, some of the plot devices are so clumsy and heavy handed it's at times difficult to keep reading; the sad fact of these plot devices are that they're entirely unnecessary and whilst on paper (so to speak) they might seem useful to maintain tension, in practice they are not needed. There's no need to introduce aircraft capable of travelling at Mach 15 purely such that the protagonist doesn't have to spend long travelling or get a chance to sleep.
Where this book redeems itself is in the use of accurate reference to history (and various conspiracy theories), particularly to Roman art and architecture, reminding one of a sort of "Foucault's Pendulum - Ultra-lite". It's almost as if the author was so engrossed with this aspect of his novel that he neglected to pay adequate attention to the remainder of the novel. But for this aspect of the novel, this would be just another unremarkable mass-market thriller.
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on 15 January 2015
I loved The Da Vinci Code, and think I preferred it a little more than Angels & Demons. Though I think this is due to thinking this plot was more dragged out, stopping me from reading as quickly as I'd like. But never mind, it was still overall a great book.

What I like about the books the most is that rather than make you criticise religion as some people do, it just allows you to think about it a little more than usual. It just makes you wonder in a light hearted way, rather than punching you in the gut.

If you've watched the movie's, it doesn't matter what order you read the first two books, as you already know the plot. Though If you haven't stick to the proper order.

I find that this book is overall a very good book, but because I think it's a little slower than The Da Vinci Code, I couldn't give it the five stars I hoped I would. Though I'd still highly recommend this one as much as The Da Vinci Code
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42 of 52 people found the following review helpful
Dan Brown's Angels and Demons is a fast-paced detective drama that involves science, art, the Catholic Church, and murder.
Harvard symbology professor Robert Langdon is the protagonist who finds himself at a Swiss nuclear research facility. It seems a scientist, who specialized in explosive antimatter, has been murdered and the historically infamous society, the Illuminati, is involved. The antimatter has been taken, and Langdon joins the scientist's daughter, Vittoria, on a mad dash through some of Rome's most famous landmarks, in an effort to find it before the Vatican is leveled.
If you read "The Da Vinci Code," this plot will be very familiar to you: Robert receives yet another call in the middle of the night, is taken to see another dead man killed by a secret anti-Catholic society, and helps the victim's lovely daughter/granddaughter unravel a series of clues to solve the crime - all at breakneck speed!
I liked the plot of Angels and Demons and found much of middle section wonderfully absorbing and tense, as Robert and Vittoria decipher ancient clues and race from place to place in Rome, fast on the heels of a murderer. The beginning of the book, which discusses antimatter, was slow-going for me and the conclusion is way over the top in terms of realism. The timeline was a major stumbling block: Being able to travel great distances across Rome in minutes (even seconds) took away some credibility for me.
In spite of the weaknesses, the basic story of Angels and Demons is very exciting and, at times, even spine-tingling. If you have been to Rome, you will enjoy revisiting the city in this book. You'll also learn about the inner workings of the Vatican, how a new Pope is selected, and about the Illuminati, which I found fascinating.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 14 June 2012
Everywhere there is suspicion of conspiracy. What might be offputting to some readers is the extravagence of the violence towards inncent victims, but then again it is no different to in the other books. This particular story finds demons emerging out of religion and inhabiting a select group of scientists, the Illuminati, a group supposedly long disbanded, but appearing in a very dangerous form. There is adventure, even impossible adventure, a hero and heroine, and even romance.
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on 22 June 2009
I had read The Da Vinci Code a few years ago whilst on holiday and couldn't put it down. I went to see the film and enjoyed it too although it was very different to the book. With this in mind I decided to read Angels & Demons before the film and in doing so was very disappointed with the film.

The book is amazing,probably the best book I have read in years, and considering I read a book a week that is pretty impressive. I started to read it on Thursday evening after I had finished the daily work, dinner and school routines. Went to work Friday and did the same monotonous routines that evening then started to read my book. By eight o'clock that evening was completely hooked.
Saturday up four am to start reading in earnest, by late evening had finished it, only stopping to make lunch and dinner (to my families amazement)

A definite must read book, a million times better than the film.
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