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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A pretty mind blowing read!
Follows the same thriller formula as his other books which Hitchock devised 50 years ago - a 24 hours chase with the protagonist (with girl) pursued by both the cops and the baddies while they follow a trail of clues in an attempt to solve all the puzzles before an imminent deadline that threatens with catastophy. There is also the obligatory completely mad bad guy...
Published on 18 Aug 2010 by Dedonno Jason Enzo

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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars a bit of a drag
back when I worked in a bar I had one customer who loved to hear his own voice. Out of politeness I would stand or sit and listen to him drone on about things he knew of. He'd go on for hours on end. Sometimes he'd come up with a gem of a saying or some vital bit of gossip, but aside from that it was painful having to listen to him.

Reading this book felt just...
Published 17 months ago by C. Winterburn


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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars dan brown at his best, 24 Oct 2009
By 
G. forsyth (glasgow,scotland) - See all my reviews
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having read dan`s previous books the lost symbol is a fascinating look into the world of the masons. the book takes a little while to get started but once it does its a gripping book that is hard to put down.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very good book, 23 Oct 2009
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What can I say except this is a very good book that I have enjoyed from the start to end!
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Lost Symbol. Dan Brown, 21 Oct 2009
By 
Mrs. J. Percy (uk) - See all my reviews
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nobody tells it quite like him! could not put this book down, a great story and lots of information too. wonder what he will write next?
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Lost Symbol, 15 Oct 2009
By 
Michael Steven "luteskerry" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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this book is lacking in imagination and is the same structure as the rest of his books.
Talk about flogging a dead horse.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars well....!!!???, 15 Oct 2009
By 
Nicklas Bergqvist "nicklasb" (Gothenburg, Sweden) - See all my reviews
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I didn't know what to expect of this brand new book from one of my favourite authors, I was just praying that the bad guy wasn't just as predictible as in his recent books, it was not actually. The book however was more for the american public than the other two starring Robert Langdon as the hero, the book itself was a confusing one with symbols high and low written by ancient people and taken to america by the founding fathers who were nearly all masons! It contained some interesting facts but was really confusing and BORING, I found myself skipping pages just so that I could get to the end faster. If you want to read a great book by Dan Brown I suggest you read Angels & Demons, by far his best book in my opinion!
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Incorrect symbols, 1 Oct 2009
By 
Nystrom Gunnar "Heraldist" (Finland) - See all my reviews
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The book is a reasonable copy of the earlier two books, not anyway good. When the book has symbols in focus it would have been natural that the named symbols would be right. I thought that Dan Brown was more educated in this matter. I am not myself an expert but anyway it is easy to find out that the symbols for the Cancer and the Capricornus (Capricorn) are not what they should be. The Cancer in the book is mirror image of the right one and the Capricorn is just wrong. This is just a feedback on the constallation symbols, what about the other ones?
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The Butler did it, 28 Sep 2009
By 
Jonathan (Hünstetten, Germany) - See all my reviews
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What a long awaited disappointment.

Some of the masons stuff is fairly accurate, the plot is too easy to second guess and chapter 117 basically is a huge disappointment The authour was definitely struggling here. As for Mal'akh, anyone who couldn't see that coming...

Very low brow.
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5 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ANOTHER Page Turner from Brown, 21 Sep 2009
In my opinion - a book that keeps me searching on Google and makes me learn is good. Don't be put off by any negatives comments on this book. I picked it up and didn't put it down again until I was finished. I wanted to have a coloured marker pen in my hand to highlight the bits I needed to Google and find out more about. Another hit from Mr Brown!

J. HILL
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13 of 31 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Kak for the masses, 22 Sep 2009
By 
Peter Burgher - See all my reviews
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Tosh, drivel, rubbish, numptiness, stoopid, putrid... gods help me if I ever meet a moron who claims to have read - and liked - this complete waste of paper.
I am convinced from the number of positive reviews of this utter trash that the world deserves all that's coming to it.
Come on global warming - drown 'em all.
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6 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not perfect, but it'll keep you amused for a few hours, 23 Oct 2009
The world went crazy for The Da Vinci Code a few years back. For months, water coolers were alive with talk of the Holy Grail, Rose Lines and hidden symbolism. But with mass appeal comes the inevitable backlash from self-proclaimed literary experts spouting accusations of poor writing, flimsy characterization and falsified research. Suddenly everyone who had pretended to love and understand Dan Brown's work now had to pretend they hated it, because God forbid people would actually form their own opinions instead of following the group consensus like a flock of marginally self-aware sheep. Anyway, the upshot is that these days, proclaiming yourself a fan of Dan Brown generally renders you about as popular as Osama Bin Laden dressed in a Nazi stormtrooper uniform.

The Lost Symbol, Brown's latest entry in the Robert Langdon series, therefore had a bit of a mountain to climb if it was going to win back public approval.

The book kicks off in Washington DC. Langdon has been invited by his old friend Peter Solomon to deliver a lecture in the Capitol Building. But Langdon soon learns that the invitation was a ruse. Someone has taken Peter hostage, and will only release him if Langdon can find an ancient treasure powerful enough to change the world. Accompanying Langdon is Peter's beautiful sister, a scientist working on a research project which has the potential to radically alter human understanding of the world around them.

The plot, which spans about twelve hours, sees Langdon traipsing around local DC landmarks like the Capitol Building, the Library of Congress, the House of the Temple and even the Washington Monument in search of this mysterious treasure. This being a Dan Brown book, he has to solve clues, decipher codes and make sense of obscure riddles. And of course, there are multiple layers of meaning to everything, subtle symbolism and hidden information that isn't fully understood until the end.

The thing that sets this book apart is the absolutely blistering pace. Rarely do I find myself sitting on my sofa at midnight, still feverishly reading an hour after I'd said I would stop, but I did it with The Lost Symbol. Each chapter, each section is so dripping with tension that you find yourself pushing forward relentlessly, hoping in vain for some kind of resolution.

But the thing is, such resolution never really comes.

The first and second acts are a master class in pacing and tension, with the stakes getting raised higher and higher, but it all kind of unravels in the final act when Brown is finally forced to make good on his promises. I was expecting a finale that was grand and triumphant, but what I got instead was strangely low key and subdued. I won't go so far as to say that the ending is disappointing, but it does leave you feeling slightly cheated.

Brown's weakness has always been his characters, which are usually paper thin and given no personality. The Lost Symbol does take steps in the right direction (Langdon and Mal-akh are quite well fleshed out), but not enough to make them compelling. Katherine, the smart but sexy scientist, often finds herself in dangerous situations, but I never found myself concerned for her because, I realized, I didn't care for the character.

Mal-akh, the tattooed Devil-worshipping villain, is interesting enough, but suffers from the common problem of initially appearing super intelligent and omnipotent, then gradually becoming more stupid as the story progresses. By the end, I had no more understanding of his motives than at the start. Oh, and if you don't see the `twist' about his background coming from a mile off, you probably need help dressing yourself in the morning.

Da Vinci Code received a lot of stick for its none-too-flattering depiction of the Catholic church. I suspect Brown may have learned his lesson here, because the Freemasons (the book's central focus) are generally portrayed as a fair and wise, but often misunderstood brotherhood who only have mankind's best interests at heart. It may be because Brown himself is more sympathetic towards the Freemason's philosophy, but The Lost Symbol provides an interesting insight into one of the world's most secretive societies.

Brown is often criticised for creative use of historical facts, or of manufacturing evidence to support his theories, and while I can't dispute the notion that he occasionally manipulates reality for the sake of fiction, I think such criticisms are missing the point. These are works of fiction - they aren't intended to answer all questions, but rather to inspire people to seek their own answers.

In that regard then, The Lost Symbol is a success. It might not be the height of literary art, but it is exciting, captivating, thought provoking and FUN. Give it a go. What's the worst that could happen?
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The Lost Symbol (Robert Langdon)
The Lost Symbol (Robert Langdon) by Dan Brown (Paperback - 22 July 2010)
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