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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 2 June 2013
This book finished on a real high, I loved the journey as I did all the ones that came before. Character's of old who'd been in and out of the books from the very start all got their moment to shine in their own way and plotlines were all wrapped up. The climax was exciting, but also surprisingly heart wrenching in places.

Overall the ending was very satisfying, and if I didn't know there was a follow on series I would be perfectly content with how this has ended. I am glad there are more books though for the simple reason that it means I can spend more hours with these great characters in this imaginative and complex world
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on 22 April 2008
This book forms part of a terrific series beginning with `Belgareth the Sorcerer' which for some reason is not available through Amazon UK. I don't read much of this genre (fantasy) but like The Hobbit/ Lord of the Rings this will appeal to a large audience.

Following Belgareth the Sorcerer there are two series of 5 books, `The Belgariad' and `The Mallorean' and it is advisable to read them in order, and if you can read `Belgareth' first (although you could save it and read it afterwards like a prequel).

I raced through the series. The Eddings' (the books were written by a couple) create a Tolkein-esque world with our hero Belgareth learning powers known as `the will and the word' through centuries of study under a benevolent God (the gods that created this world still live on it in physical form). This study elevates him to the status of a sorcerer and elongates his life span - he becomes a legend and a force for good in the world. However, another disciple of his benevolent master rebels and steals the holy `Orb' stone, following a more sinister God. In the later series the Gods have left the planet in fear that their battle will destroy the world but their peoples continue to war - following the Prophecies left to them by the Gods. The two series follow the course of events as Belgareth leads the hunt for the traitor and the stone. It's very cleverly written and characters and events reappear as we become familiar with the history of this fictional world through the course of the books.

Really good fun and a definite recommendation if you want a light hearted escape that will keep you reading late into the night.

This is the order of the books:

The Belgariad
1. Pawn of Prophecy
2. Queen of Sorcery
3. Magician's Gambit
4. Castle of Wizardry
5. Enchanters' End Game

The Malloreon
1. Guardians of the West
2. King of the Murgos
3. Demon Lord of Karanda
4. Sorceress of Darshiva
5. The Seeress of Kell
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on 15 July 2014
The fate of the world depends on one duel. Garion is now the King of Riva, but he knows there will be no peace as long as Torak lives. Garion along with Belgarath and Silk set out to find him. In order to keep Torak's forces focus away from Garion, and also to keep the peace in the West, Ce'Nedra has gathered her forces and is ready to take on the Angarak's. With Garion getting close to Torak, he knows he will have to fight him, but how can he possibly win against a God. With the two prophecies converging, which side will win?

Enchanters' End Game is the final book in the Belgariad and it wraps up everything from the previous books. There are two storylines going on in this book and whilst I liked Ce'Nedra and Pol's, I was more interested in Garion's.

Garion is really depressed in this book but is also very determined, and it has been enjoyable watching him grow up. Whilst I like Ce'Nedra more than when we first met her, she doesn't realise how dangerous and serious war can be, and doesn't think about the consequences of her actions

This is the end of a really good classic fantasy book and I would recommend Enchanters' End Game to people who enjoyed the first 4 books and if you have enjoyed this series, I would suggest you read the sequel series, The Malloreon, and the prequel's Belgarath the Sorcerer, and Polgara the Sorceress.
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on 22 May 1999
Enchanter's End Game nicely ends The Belgariad series leaving the discerning reader with plenty of questions......well written, with as much action, drama, tears and laughter as any decent epic needs, this book brings to an end the quest for the Orb of Aldur with lots of sword and sorcery shenanigans and wonderful characters such as Silk and Barak who you know could never really exist (and if they did, they'd be incredibly irritating!) but without whom, these books would be much less entertaining. Most loose ends are nicely tied up but some tantalising ones are left for the following series, The Mallorean, to answer....in that series, the characters are older and much more mature but the lives of old friends are revisited and new friends are made...and for those of you wondering, Silk does get his come-uppance! Both The Belgariad and The Mallorean need to be read in sequence to be fully appreciated but they are worth the read. If you like the sword & sorcery genre, these two series, in my humble opinion are the best Eddings has to offer and the only other recommendation I could make is to suggest that Raymond E Feist's Magician series be tried. As much as I love these two series of Eddings' work, they are surpassed by Feist's books which are slightly darker and will appeal to the older reader much more.
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on 28 June 2014
One review for all of the 5 Books in this series - I LOVE THEM. I bless the day I walked into Waterstones in Manchester and Ariel introduced me to these books. I have worn out one set of paperback books in this series. The second set have seen plenty of reading. About to go away for a few days rather than pack a few of the books I downloaded the set. I tend to return to the books at least every 18 months. Aunt Pol, Garion, Old Wolf are old friends/extended family. No matter how often I return to them they never cease fo grip my interest from the start of Book 1 to the last page of Book 5. Having finished off The Belgariad I then had the second seriesto re-read the "Mallorean", again on my second set of paperbacks for that series too.

I would recommend these Books to anyone. If you are coming to Fantasy fiction for the first time or you like to care for the people your reading about this is perfect. Eddings cares for these people and so will you. One thing I would add from my own experience, "Belgareth the Sorcerer" can be read at any time before, after or during the Series. "Polgara the Sorceress" I would recommend not to be read until you have read both the "Belgariad" & the "Mallorean"
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on 29 August 2011
The Belgariad series has been one of my favourite reads. I first completed the series in paperback as a teenager when the idea of a boy growing in to an inheritance and going on a quest was very appealing.

I recently re-read the series as Kindle books and found most of the appeal still there. I say "most" as there were some areas that did not flow the way I had remembered them. For instance the Princess C'Nedra deciding to lead an army in the latter books of the series seemed a little far-fetched given that this character was portrayed as a spoilt child earlier in the series. The motivations of some of the characters also seemed a little single-minded.

One of the main enjoyment factors of the series though was the humour of the narration. This coupled with an easy flow to the story still make it a favourite.

For those wanting a gritty, adult, action fantasy you will be disappointed, but if you like a light, humourous fantasy then this is well recommended.

I have posted this review on all the books in the series as I cannot distinguish between any one of them
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on 2 March 2001
This, the final piece of the puzzle that is known as the Belgariad, is all that readers of the previous books will have wanted. Eddings manages to pick up the pace again after Belgarion et al get home with the Orb - the characters main motivation for much of the series, and refocuses on Torak, slumbering in the City of Endless Night, rather neatly.
Garion is soon on the road again, and Ce'Nedra, getting a serious attack of girl power decides to raise an army and hare off down south, with the rest of the 'gang' to create a diversion for her beloved Garion when he decides to go after Torak (almost) alone.
If you're looking to buy this book I assume you've read the previous books, and will already be a fan of Eddings fast paced, easy going style. I really like the way he creates a satisfing and believable environment, but with enough blank spaces to keep your imagination occupied. The light banter between characters can get a bit repetative, and lacks a little in depth, but overall he tells a ripping yarn. Buy it.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 15 February 2002
This is a wonderfull book it's wit and humour delighted me constantly while i read it. Particularly silks cynisism and Ce'nedra's clever tricks. The book is not all laughter though and I found the scenes at the end somehow very moving (those who have read it will know which ones i mean). Garion's adventures have had me hooked all through the belgariad and this book was a very worthy follow-up to its companions. It is well written but more importantly the story itself is a fantastic one which could not fail to compell. I hope everyone who reads this reveiw will read Enchanters End-Game and the ones which came before it and love them just like I did.
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on 9 April 2001
Fantasy may not be your thing. But if you did start reading The Pawn of Prophecy you will read this eventually. True, if you read the final in the series it makes absolutely no sense, but then you'd expect that wouldn't you? Follow Belgarion and his cohorts to their final destination. Will he defeat the evil God Torak and will the universe be set to rights (of course it will, but its fun finding out how they do it)? The witticisms of Silk and friendly banter between the characters continues to entertain and provides a more human dimension to the guise of " unassuming saviour of the universe" which we're all familiar with. Still great fun, but probably more for the idealistic 13 year old than the worldly wise 53. If you like it, then check out the Malloreon series which continues Garion's adventures and starts with Guardians of the West.
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on 1 October 2010
Well, What can I say, Im coming to this book late (for its publishing) not in my life. It is one of the most satisfying series' I have read. I wasnt left with that feeling of "oh, that was anti-climatic" for the ending of the tale we had been following through the previous 4 books. Im not going to write spoilers but this book was everything expected and more.

Wonderful writing and I disagree with those who think the ending is without its merit. Its a very good rounding off and doesnt seem forced (like the LOTR one did, in both book and film)Of course, its just my opinion, but I cannot wait to get onto the next one (book one of the next five book series, the Mallorean)

Definate place on the bookshelf and an easy pick it up and read the entire set again.
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