Customer Reviews


87 Reviews
5 star:
 (35)
4 star:
 (25)
3 star:
 (14)
2 star:
 (5)
1 star:
 (8)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


54 of 55 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars forerunner of the da vinci code
Whether you believe the premise of the book or not(and I don't),it's a fantastic read. I hope this new edition sells well after being mentioned in Dan Brown's bestselling Da Vinci Code.
More facts have come out about the truth(or lack of it) about the secret society supposedly protecting an earth shattering secret,but I still recommend buying the book because it's...
Published on 24 Aug 2005 by Amazon Customer

versus
48 of 51 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining nonsense
To an extent. Some of what is contained in this book is documented historical fact, and as a professional historian, I'm always delighted when material is presented in a fashion that interests a wider audience. I view this sort of thing as the written equivalent of a cinematic 'historical' epic. Is is particularly accurate? No. But it doesn't pretend to be either -the...
Published on 22 May 2006 by S. Lindgren


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

54 of 55 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars forerunner of the da vinci code, 24 Aug 2005
By 
Amazon Customer "WHITECRANE" (the MIDLANDS) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Whether you believe the premise of the book or not(and I don't),it's a fantastic read. I hope this new edition sells well after being mentioned in Dan Brown's bestselling Da Vinci Code.
More facts have come out about the truth(or lack of it) about the secret society supposedly protecting an earth shattering secret,but I still recommend buying the book because it's very well written unlike many of this genre. It contains references the reader can check.
The book will introduce many accepted facts about the knights templars,early history of christianity,merovingians and carolingians and the cathars which you can learn while taking with a pinch of salt the controversial stuff.Thats what I did and it stimulated my interest in these subjects,something that wouldn't have happened if I just had dry boring history books. By making it almost an exciting detective story it stimulates the readers interest and keeps you turning the page.
Brilliant.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


48 of 51 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining nonsense, 22 May 2006
By 
S. Lindgren - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
To an extent. Some of what is contained in this book is documented historical fact, and as a professional historian, I'm always delighted when material is presented in a fashion that interests a wider audience. I view this sort of thing as the written equivalent of a cinematic 'historical' epic. Is is particularly accurate? No. But it doesn't pretend to be either -the authors do stress that many of their conclusions are conjecture, no more. What it is, is entertaining, and will introduce people who might never otherwise have taken an interest in history to, to take a single example, the Crusades. And that's fine by me -it might well prompt them to take a greater interest in history in the future.

There are inumerable problems of course. For each of the documented facts, there are at least a dozen erroneous ones. Much of the source material utilised is questionable at the very best. And yet I still find myself unable to condem them, as I would with many other books, for, as I mentioned above, they stress the fact that their conjectures lack proof. The book itself is actually well written for what it is; unusual for a book with several authors, it is sensibly set out, the style[s] is / are fluid and readable, and it's good fun.

Some suggest this book is blasphemous. Fair enough, that's their opinion, though I don't share or even understand it. As far as I know, there is nothing in the Bible, or accepted Christian doctine, that states that Jesus could, or perhaps I should say, 'should' not, have been married. I don't believe it (part of me would like to), but I fail to see what is so very wrong about the idea. He was supposed to be a Man as well as the Son of God -that was the whole point insofar as I am aware. Still, if you are going to be upset by it, don't bother to read. Save yourself the money, the time, and the raised blood pressure. The rest of you -give it a try. Something to look at on holiday, provided that you go in with a mind open enough to accept a new idea, and sceptical enough to appreciate the limitations.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Controversial to Say the Least, 17 Mar 2007
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This book has recently gained a huge amount of publicity with the court case between the authors and the author of the Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown. I purchased the book on the back of that wave of publicity and having now read both books cannot really see what the court case was all about. The books could not be more different, not withstanding that the Da Vinci Code has no basis in fact and is a figment of the authors imagination. Most of the books written today contain regurgitated information from other books, either factual or fiction.

This book has a basis in fact, although much of it may be the vivid imagination of the authors. To be honest I don't know the answer. The book is both controversial, shocking and deeply moving. It is interesting and thought provoking. Whether you believe the conclusions that the authors come to, is a different matter and one for the individual. Perhaps the authors findings are as plausible an account of the life and times of Jesus as the one generally recognised by the church as true. It is a matter of the individuals faith. It is very difficult, if not impossible to prove anything either way.

I enjoyed reading the book, that is not to say that I agreed with its findings.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


59 of 66 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail, 13 Jan 2005
By A Customer
I read this book ten years ago and loved it. I read the Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown in half a day over the Christmas Holidays, only because so many people recommended it, all of which had never read the Holy blood. If they had have done they would have found the Da Vinci Code tedious and derivative. It was an okay yarn, but nothing special. To anyone who has read the Da Vinci Code and has been intrigued, read this book. To the reviewer who could not believe it was a best seller - everyone I knew read this at least 10 years ago and made their friends read it too - so it really was!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Controversial, To Say the Least, 12 Feb 2008
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This book has gained a huge amount of publicity with the court case between the authors and the author of the Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown. I purchased the book on the back of that wave of publicity and having now read both books cannot really see what the court case was all about. The books could not be more different, not withstanding that the Da Vinci Code has no basis in fact and is a figment of the authors imagination. Most of the books written today contain regurgitated information from other books, either factual or fiction.

This book has a basis in fact, although much of it may be the vivid imagination of the authors. To be honest I don't know the answer. The book is both controversial, shocking and deeply moving. It is interesting and thought provoking. Whether you believe the conclusions that the authors come to, is a different matter and one for the individual. Perhaps the authors findings are as plausible an account of the life and times of Jesus as the one generally recognised by the church as true. It is a matter of the individuals faith. It is very difficult, if not impossible to prove anything either way.

I enjoyed reading the book, that is not to say that I agreed with its findings.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Rubbish but a whole heap of fun, 9 Sep 2007
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have to agree with 'gingerburn' and his progression from excitement to disillusion over 3 readings of the book. However, I think it deserves 3 stars because it IS fun to read the first time and, if nothing else, provokes thought. I was still a practising Catholic when I first read the book (I was about 16 or 17 I think) and it started the long process of questioning that culminated in me contentedly deciding I am an atheist. Disregard all the hooey about the descendants of Jesus (who cares?!) and concentrate on the details of how the early Christian church manipulated its own records and broadcast the correct propaganda to ensure it survived with a creditable future. That was an eye opener and it launched me into reading more....
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


35 of 40 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A cracking historical mystery..., 11 Mar 2001
By A Customer
A totally engrossing and thoroughly researched historical mystery. If you are in any way interested in the origins of Christianity, or the activities of secret societies through the ages, or preferably a combination of both - then this is a MUST read.
Of course, a healthy pinch of scepticism should be maintained along the way - the authors do make a number of leaps from 'possible' to 'definite' within the space of a paragraph. And the hypothesis relies on about 50 'maybes' to be true along the way for the argument to have validity. In general, the sections which deal with established periods of history (the Cathar heresy for example) hold together better as arguments. The final section of the book which deals with the period immediately after the supposed death of Jesus, i.e. a period of almost totally undocumented history, appears the most speculative.
Nevertheless, it is an exquisitely argued book which spawned a whole wave of imitators, and if even SOME of their hypothesis is proven to be correct it would be fascinating. Interested readers might also like Foucault's Pendulum by Umberto Eco - a novel based on some of the material from this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail, 10 Oct 2007
By 
Mike (St Paul, USA) - See all my reviews
Anybody who does not believe everything written in the bible will find this book interesting., and even those who believe in the gospel truth of the bible and have an open mind about it will still enjoy the probing nature of the book. The author said it himself that he does not believe or disbelieve what he wrote because they are more of the opinions of others. He used the particular phrase of "it is said that " in presenting his case.

It should be noted that the book is written to present the cases of those who held the belief that Jesus didn't die in the cross and began a bloodline hat survived him and still survives until today, and those who do not hold that belief. And since the Christian world does not hold that belief, the book had to focus on presenting the case of those who support that belief even if it is far-fetched. I am a Christian and I do not believe the skeptics, still I find this book interesting. It lets one get an idea of how things were during the early days of the church, an unsettling situation which could not be devoid of the emergence of myths. What is myth or reality about the life of Jesus is a question of faith. Still this book is a recommended read. UNION MOUJIK , THE DA VINCI CODE, THE MESSAINIC LEGACY ,DISCIPLES OF FORTUNE,are very easy bookS to read with very captivating stories.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Controversial, to Say the Least, 17 Mar 2007
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This book has recently gained a huge amount of publicity with the court case between the authors and the author of the Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown. I purchased the book on the back of that wave of publicity and having now read both books cannot really see what the court case was all about. The books could not be more different, not withstanding that the Da Vinci Code has no basis in fact and is a figment of the authors imagination. Most of the books written today contain regurgitated information from other books, either factual or fiction.

This book has a basis in fact, although much of it may be the vivid imagination of the authors. To be honest I don't know the answer. The book is both controversial, shocking and deeply moving. It is interesting and thought provoking. Whether you believe the conclusions that the authors come to, is a different matter and one for the individual. Perhaps the authors findings are as plausible an account of the life and times of Jesus as the one generally recognised by the church as true. It is a matter of the individuals faith. It is very difficult, if not impossible to prove anything either way.

I enjoyed reading the book, that is not to say that I agreed with its findings.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


38 of 44 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars And the truth just makes people mad, 1 Nov 2004
By 
Christine Menendez (St. Andreu de Llavaneres, Barcelona Spain) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I'm not going to rehash a whole lot of other reviews telling you what the book is about. It is interesting, certainly well researched, and tedious as hell. I have a hard time believing that enough people actually read this entire book to make it a "shocking international best seller". Probably bought it hoping for sensationalism and instead encountered a whole lot of meticulously researched ancient history.
But what I really liked about this book, and actually grinned while reading it, is that the authors came very close to apologising for their discoveries. A kind of don't kill the messenger kind of thing. They went off an expedition to find one thing and ended up with another. Also, a lot of reviews speak of their "assumptions". Theories are plainly stated as such, not as fact, as are assumptions. These guys tell you what they think makes sense but do not express an idea or an assumption as a fact. So the reader can just ignore these or come to his own conclusions. All in all, if you are interested in this kind of thing and have a lot of patience to wade through a ton of history and genealogies, I would recommend the book. And if you really like this kind of thing, check out Graham Phillips, who actually writes chapter reviews and does not demand so much patience from his readers.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail
The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail by Henry Lincoln (Paperback - 12 Aug 1983)
Used & New from: £0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews