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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars exciting,illuminating,sad,humorous, brutal and picturesque
The most wonderful thing about Leon Uris' books are his testament to the eternal indomitable strength of the human spirit. This novel explores the agony and struggles of Ireland through the story of a fictional Irish fighter, Conor Larkin. The book begins with the deth of Kilty Larkin, the father of Tomas, and grandfather of Conor. It captures the sights, sounds , smell...
Published 20 months ago by Gary Selikow

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars families, feuds and farce in the politics of 19th century Ireland
This book describes the interactions and feuds between Irish catholic farmers, the aristocracy and protestant workers from mid 19th century up to the start of the First World War. With rebellion brewing, the interactions are laced with poison, with all parties protecting and furthering their own interests.

The poignant moments of family crisis (births, deaths...
Published on 21 Sep 2008 by John Holland


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars exciting,illuminating,sad,humorous, brutal and picturesque, 10 Aug 2012
By 
This review is from: Trinity (Paperback)
The most wonderful thing about Leon Uris' books are his testament to the eternal indomitable strength of the human spirit. This novel explores the agony and struggles of Ireland through the story of a fictional Irish fighter, Conor Larkin. The book begins with the deth of Kilty Larkin, the father of Tomas, and grandfather of Conor. It captures the sights, sounds , smell and experiences of Iralnd in 19th century Ireland through the eyes of Conor's childhood friend Seamus. Conor is visited by a shanachie ( type of Irish spirit) of a n Irish storyteller who has experienced the early rebellions of the 19th century and the 1846 potato famine. This sets him off on the path of Irish revolution against British rule.

He grows up to become a master craftsman, rugby player, poet and eventually revolutionary and gun runer.
The book is filled with good and evil characters : The aristocratic British overlords the Hubbles and sir Frederick Weed who plays the Orange Card to strengthen British rule over Ireland and the great profits to be made out of the country, As such the book explores the horror of the poverty and exploitation suffered at the time by the Irish people.

I fell in love with the beautiful and valiant lover of Conor's the working class Protestant Shelley McLeod, who joins herself body and soul to Conor and his cause. and I was sickened and haunted by the cruel and horrific murder of Shelley at the hands of a group of fanatical and embittered Protestant women who are followers of the fiery and bigoted Loyalist preacher, Oliver Cromwell McIvor.

The last few chapter of the book are interesting that they encapsulate a précis of Ireland's history in the early years of the twentieth century until the 1916v Easter Rising and home Rule.
The only real downside to the book is the way all Protestant Loyalists are depicted as villainous and the bias towards the Catholic and Republican side. When the truth is there have been wrongs and rights on both sides of this conflicts, atrocities commited by all and tragedies suffered by all.
Nevertheless this epic is exciting,illuminating,sad,humorous, brutal and picturesque.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars families, feuds and farce in the politics of 19th century Ireland, 21 Sep 2008
By 
John Holland (Surrey, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Trinity (Paperback)
This book describes the interactions and feuds between Irish catholic farmers, the aristocracy and protestant workers from mid 19th century up to the start of the First World War. With rebellion brewing, the interactions are laced with poison, with all parties protecting and furthering their own interests.

The poignant moments of family crisis (births, deaths and marriages) are superbly portrayed, and there is energy in the build-up to key events, which almost compels but just falls short.

This is a well-written book, that describes background and history in great detail to back up the story. But it fails to build on the beginnings. The book builds a compelling plot to a point, but the conclusion moves into short summaries that are almost notes of the planned ending, compared to the previous prose.

Some years later, Leon Uris wrote Redemption as a sequel to this novel. With better use of time-shifting, Redemption is a better telling of both its own story and this one.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A damned good read, 17 April 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Trinity (Paperback)
This is a must read book for students of Irish history, or for those who enjoy a good, pacey yarn. It’s well researched, written in an easy to read, straightforward style and while it gives a biased view of Irish politics, you can perhaps begin to understand why the Irish nationalists are the way they are. Don’t be put off by the politics though. Uris explores the characters and shows all their strengths and weaknesses and you are swept along with their exploits and loves. A smashing read, hugely enjoyable, exciting, sad, funny – yeah, it’s probably got just about everything.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read, 27 Feb 2013
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This review is from: Trinity (Paperback)
What a fantastic read. Covering over a hundred years of Irish history and made me ashamed to be part of the british regime that has so desicrated Ireland. Highly recommend this to anyone
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Trinity, 19 Dec 2012
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This review is from: Trinity (Paperback)
I love this book, from the very start until the end it keeps you captivated and I would highly recommend it to my friends and family
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars brilliant book, 12 Feb 2012
This review is from: Trinity (Mass Market Paperback)
a great book which if you have any irish / catholic in you this is not to be missed. this is my second time of reading this book and it is as tho' you are living the life of the main man conor larkin. a lot of reading but well worth it
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24 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great read -- but keep an open mind, 24 Jan 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Trinity (Paperback)
Like the other reviewers, I really enjoyed this book. It's a "ripping yarn" from start to finish, and a great way of explaining some of the main events in Ireland's recent history. Excellent for a new student to Irish history. However, do be cautious and aware of some bias in the tale that Uris tells. If you do know anything about Irish history of the 1600s to 1900s, you'll know it's possible to have many interpretations of the same events. For me, Uris over-emphasises the republican side of these issues. To be really frank, and over-general, he paints catholics (and/or republicans) as strong and honest, but downtrodden, while his protesants (or loyalists) -- and his British characters -- are manipulative, greedy and abusive. For every slant Uris uses, there is (at least) one other side of the story. So, please, read this as a great tale set in Ireland, but certainly not a definitive history lesson. If you want to know about Irish history, please, please read a more complete and unbiased text -- don't rely on Leon Uris.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Not one for Irish readers, 1 April 2014
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This review is from: Trinity (Paperback)
My family has lived in the area where this story is set for centuries (Derry and Donegal). I had no idea that American English was spoken in these areas until I read this book. There is absolutely no way that Irish people would have used words such as "b------t" and "horse---t" one hundred years ago. Nor would they have "fixed lunch". The hero of the narrative, one Conor Larkin, utters the following sentence; "Have I ever told you how
pleased I am to have made your acquaintance, lady ?". This sentence is made to be spoken in a Deep South accent, not Donegal. This book's target readership is obviously America. If you're Irish, you should avoid it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars a wonderful read, 6 Feb 2014
By 
Mrs. K. Gamble (Dorset, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Trinity (Hardcover)
A fantastic book about Irish history. A big book but lots of content
which is a fictional story but with accurate facts all around it.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Great story a pity about the soune, 1 Oct 2012
This review is from: Trinity (Paperback)
Great story, read before years ago, wanted re- read but pages started falling out by page 10. A pity as a wonderful book but persevered in actually reading it as I was in holiday, needless to say it didn't come home with me.
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Trinity
Trinity by Leon Uris (Paperback - 7 Oct 1977)
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