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5.0 out of 5 stars horror tales of the unexpected, 20 Mar 2012
By 
Mr. Ad Cole "darlington" (darlington united kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
it is good to see this book has been published again as the original i have is falling to bits!
all the stories in this collection are classics and have unexpected endings so it is difficult to say which ones are the best. i suppose one can only say that each story has its own charm and is unique from the previous story in the collection.
once you have read them all then you will understand what i mean. always a little puzzled why there was no follow up book to this collection!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Qaulity 70's Horror, 28 April 2012
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There's a bit of a 70's revival going on at that moment so look out your glam gear, platform shoes and Abba LP's and let's head back to the early 1970's when David A. Sutton was busy putting together the Third volume of New Writings in Horror and the Supernatural, unfortunately the original publishers dropped the series but it was eventually published in 1975 by Corgi books and then promptly went out of print. This will be the first chance many of us have had to read some of these stories and indeed some of these authors so let's dive in.

James Wade is one of the more interesting authors on display here, settling in Korea after the war his writing ranged from articles on music and war stories to Cthulhu Mythos tales. The Nightingale Floors is a strong start to the collection exploring the "delusions of sound and sight" on a museum night-watchman. It's a quiet, ambiguous and very enjoyable read.

Ramsey Campbell has gone on to be revered for his atmospheric horror tales and while some of that talent is on display in The Previous Tenant, there are also signs of an author learning his craft. The dense, at times almost poetic prose, often feels overwritten, with maybe one too many metaphors thrown into the mix, but it's still a memorable tale of obsession.

Martin I. Ricketts gives us The Night Fisherman. I've not come across this author before but this is an enjoyable, short and pointed story. Sugar And Spice And All Things Nice by David A. Sutton is an excellent and moving tale of a man who, faced with a monotonous job, enjoys watching the world go by his window right up until a mysterious girl shows up.

Provisioning by David Campton is a tongue in cheek tale about two god fearing hillbilly brothers, Keziah and Adam and their quest for food, its all gory good fun. Another gory tale is Perfect Lady by Robin Smyth which although interesting was one of the books weaker stories.

The Business About Fred by Joseph Payne Brennan, in contrast to the previous two stories, was rich and moving, full of pathos and sadness, as a lonely figure in a bar considers his effect on the world. Brian Lumley's Aunt Hester takes a long time to reach its conclusion but the ending redeems any faults in the earlier pacing.

Finally we have two occult horrors starting with A Pentagram For Cenaide by Eddy C. Bertin. A prolific SF, horror and children's author Bertin's tale is one of the best in this collection. Another slow starter but one which certainly repays the readers persistence with a rich and involved tale of a painters obsession with the wife of a friend. Finally we have The Satyr's Head by David A. Riley which reads like a lovechild of M. R. James and Dennis Wheatly as the occult powers of an ancient artifact are unwittingly found by Henry Lamson. It's an enjoyable tale but as, perhaps, the most "seventies" tale here it hasn't dated as well as some of the others.

So turns out that as well as being great for spacehoppers and polyester the 1970's was also producing some excellent horror fiction and this anthology give you the opportunity to revisit some of it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Superb Horror Anthology, 18 Jun 2011
By 
John F (Staffordshire) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Satyr's Head (Paperback)
I bought this book in 1975 when, as a teenager, I was going through a phase of reading horror anthologies and believe me this was the best of the bunch. Standout stories are 'Perfect Lady' and 'The Night Fisherman', but the crowning glory is 'The Satyr's Head' a dark, unsettling novella about a depraved mythological creature let loose in a Pennine town. The original cover painting by Patrick Woodroffe also perfectly captured the nightmarish feel of the collection.
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Satyr's Head
Satyr's Head by David A. Sutton (Paperback - 27 Jun 1975)
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