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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mistitled but excellent.
Lets get this straight (perhaps addressing the comments of a couple of other reviewers at the same time):
This book is NOT about low speed aerodynamics.

It should be called "The Panel Method for final year and graduate engineers".

Chapters 1-3 are about general theory pertaining to panel methods, which is useful although better taught elsewhere...
Published on 22 April 2010 by Mr. T. Clark

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Useful, but....
.
Not as approachable as it might be, even for an engineering graduate, albeit an old one. This is not as readable as McCormick, or even Abbott & von Doenhoff, but there is good information buried in there - just hard to extract.
I am reminded of the time when Digital Signal Processing was a black art, and lecturers were writing on the board with one hand...
Published on 6 Feb. 2004 by Big Ben


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mistitled but excellent., 22 April 2010
By 
Mr. T. Clark (Linton, Cambridgeshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Low-Speed Aerodynamics (Cambridge Aerospace Series) (Paperback)
Lets get this straight (perhaps addressing the comments of a couple of other reviewers at the same time):
This book is NOT about low speed aerodynamics.

It should be called "The Panel Method for final year and graduate engineers".

Chapters 1-3 are about general theory pertaining to panel methods, which is useful although better taught elsewhere. I was already familiar with the theory but think a beginner would have more success perhaps with one of John D Anderson's textbooks, or using the MIT OpenCourseWare lecture series.

Chapters 4-7 are about niche solutions for aerodynamic modeling. While useful, the computational ability of most lifting line and panel codes simply negates the usefulness of this stuff, as it requires a lot of theoretical work and simplifies geometries substantially.

Chapter 8 is a useful expose of lifting line theory, which is where things start to get useful for modern practical aerodynamics.

Chapters 9-10 are about the general theory of panel methods.

Chapters 11-13 are about the theory pertaining to specific types of panel methods (2D, 3D, Unsteady).

Chapter 14 is about the use of boundary layer modeling (momentum integral equation etc) to predict drag and separation characteristics. Health warning: this is only for 2D flows, it can be applied for 3D geometries but that implementation is not considered here.

Chapter 15 contains a discussion of various additions/ modifications which can be made to the panel method to extend it's functionality (free surfaces, internal flows, jet engine sources etc) but does not give technical details.

Appendices include panel codes (in FORTRAN 77). They're OK but not astonishingly clear. The book should probably be updated for vectorial expressions (F90 or MATLAB). MATLAB would be a better choice, as it has ready-coded matrix solver routines and various other useful functions.

** SUMMARY **

My position is that I'm implementing a panel method for a tidal stream turbine. I've found this to be a tremendously useful book - the theory of panel methods is not well dealt with elsewhere, so I'd previously trying to patch it together from the 'method' sections of people's theses. Fantastic.

The numerical explanations are also very good - it teaches you how to construct the matrix and RHS ready for solution (which was my problem). It does not concentrate on the matrix solution routine (rightly so, that's a subject all in itself, and there are many off-the-shelf routines available).

I have four criticisms:
- No mention of a rotating reference frame (e.g. propellers)
- No mention (that I've seen) of wake interaction with a solid component (e.g. wake from a wing intersects a pylon downstream)
- All formulations are for quadrilateral panels rather than triangular (although of course the theory extends)
- Codes would be clearer if updated to a vectorial language. They're also not supplied on CD or online, so if you want to use them, get typing!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Good, the Bad and the Ugly., 17 April 2010
By 
J. Merino "Jume" (Barcelona, Spain) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Low-Speed Aerodynamics (Cambridge Aerospace Series) (Paperback)
This book is such of books that is "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly".
It is basically focused in low speed aerodynamics panel methods, however the authors devote also one third of the book to the classical aerodynamics theory.
And that is when the "Bad" comes.
The theory and maths level of this book is high, not for the novice, and as you can imagine there is impossible to properly explain such a dense material in just a few hundred of pages.
The authors only quickly review what you "should already know" in order to properly understand panel methods which is the real main topic.
Personally, I had to jump into "Karamcheti", "Van Dyke", and others to properly understand almost all the theoretic part.

Once you have sound basis you can proceed into the panel methods, and the "Good" comes.
The subject is well explained with a lot of figures, examples, tips and state of the art additional information and references.
You will also find more than the basics, with treatment of the unsteady state, coupling with boundary layer, flow separation, and much more. Great!

But, I would like to warn everybody that after read the book wants to develop computer codes.
Proceed with extreme precaution!
2D Codes are easy, with a little effort I developed in a couple of weeks a code able to deal with multielement airfoil, but the 3D is the "Ugly".

My previous success with the 2D spurred me on to start the development of a 3D code,... A Nightmare!
The 3D geometry complicates all in an extremely way, there are hundred of subtle details about you will not find any information nor tip in the book.
And you will find yourself fighting against gradients in non orthogonal coordinates, panelling twisted surfaces and other exciting physical and mathematical problems which will demand you hundred of hours.

After moths and months I finally finished a MATLAB code able to deal with wings with the desired airfoil at an arbitrary span, sweep angle, taper ratio, dihedral angle and washout, but it hasn't been easy.

I would like to expand the code to deal with unsteady flow, boundary layer effects, or with more elaborate geometries such as winglets, ailerons or whole aircraft configurations, but I am exhausted!, after all I'm just and enthusiast, I am not even an aeronautical engineer and I do not earn a living with this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Useful, but...., 6 Feb. 2004
By 
Big Ben "fly_mo" (Bedford, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Low-Speed Aerodynamics (Cambridge Aerospace Series) (Paperback)
.
Not as approachable as it might be, even for an engineering graduate, albeit an old one. This is not as readable as McCormick, or even Abbott & von Doenhoff, but there is good information buried in there - just hard to extract.
I am reminded of the time when Digital Signal Processing was a black art, and lecturers were writing on the board with one hand whilst erasing with the other to preserve their monopoly of the technology.
I do not acuse Katz & Plotkin of this - they just seem to have arrived at a similar effect fortuitiously.
NOT for the amateur or enthusiast - it is a dense text.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must for every serious engineer, 2 Jun. 2001
This review is from: Low-Speed Aerodynamics (Cambridge Aerospace Series) (Paperback)
Written by an Aerospace an Mechanics expert, this book is excellent if you want to learn the scientific bases to improve planes, cars or boats. I wish I had this book some years ago.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good basic about numerical panel method, 10 Mar. 2014
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This review is from: Low-Speed Aerodynamics (Cambridge Aerospace Series) (Paperback)
The book is very helpful for 2D and 3D numerical panel method and also covers the theory of potential flow
in details.
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Low-Speed Aerodynamics (Cambridge Aerospace Series)
Low-Speed Aerodynamics (Cambridge Aerospace Series) by Allen Plotkin (Paperback - 5 Feb. 2001)
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