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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb intermediate-level summary of the Philosophy of Mind
In this book Jonathan Lowe, Professor of Philosophy at Durham University, offers an incredibly clear yet thorough coverage of a wide range of topics, in particular Dualism/Physicalism, Memory, Perception, Artificial Intelligence and Human Rationality, and Action. Each chapter is concise, highlighting key arguments with appropriate examples and giving realistic...
Published on 6 Sep 2000

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2.0 out of 5 stars Poor Go elsewhere
For some reason Amazon seem to have deleted my review.
This is not a good introductory text as although it covers the main topics, it's almost unreadable. The are much better books try:
Philosophy of Mind: An Introduction (Introducing Philosophy)

OR
Philosophy of Mind: A Contemporary Introduction (Routledge Contemporary Introductions to...
Published on 29 Oct 2008 by A. I. Mackenzie


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb intermediate-level summary of the Philosophy of Mind, 6 Sep 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind (Cambridge Introductions to Philosophy) (Paperback)
In this book Jonathan Lowe, Professor of Philosophy at Durham University, offers an incredibly clear yet thorough coverage of a wide range of topics, in particular Dualism/Physicalism, Memory, Perception, Artificial Intelligence and Human Rationality, and Action. Each chapter is concise, highlighting key arguments with appropriate examples and giving realistic assessments of their success or failure, before relating the issues discussed to those of previous chapters. This book is aimed at those with at least a passing familiarity with the philosophy of mind, and is much too ambitious for most beginners in the area, but is indispensible for 2nd or 3rd-year students of philosophy of mind, offering both less bias and a wider coverage than any other book currently available on the subject.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Poor Go elsewhere, 29 Oct 2008
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A. I. Mackenzie "alimack" (Glasgow, Scotland.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind (Cambridge Introductions to Philosophy) (Paperback)
For some reason Amazon seem to have deleted my review.
This is not a good introductory text as although it covers the main topics, it's almost unreadable. The are much better books try:
Philosophy of Mind: An Introduction (Introducing Philosophy)

OR
Philosophy of Mind: A Contemporary Introduction (Routledge Contemporary Introductions to Philosophy)

Both much easier to read and better argued.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A seriously good text: highly recommended, 4 Jan 2011
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Anthelm (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind (Cambridge Introductions to Philosophy) (Paperback)
I came to this text as one interested in `doing' theological anthropology, not really as a philosopher, and I found it - on the whole - to be an eminently readable and thorough introduction to the philosophy of mind. The text's broad scope covers several areas that are often omitted from standard introductory texts, whilst at the same time avoiding the unnecessary depth of detail (neurophysiological data and formal logic) that one finds in advanced texts. The text certainly presupposes some knowledge of philosophical reasoning (an ability to follow philosophical arguments, together with some knowledge of metaphysics and/or epistemology would be very useful, and it should be emphasised that this is an intermediate-level introduction, most suitable for second and third-year undergraduates in philosophy and serious students of allied disciplines (philosophical theology, anthropology, empirical psychology and neuroscience, inter alia).

Particularly welcome is the author's distinctive approach to the empirical sciences: noting an undue deference towards cognitive psychology and neuroscience amongst many contemporary philosophers of mind, the author is determined to offer a distinctly philosophical exploration of the issues at hand. Whilst not ignoring the important insights of the sciences, the author is keen to affirm both the place and necessity of philosophical investigation of the human mind, confident that whilst philosophy and empirical science are complementary, philosophy ought never be excluded from this essential area, which falls well within its `magisterium'. Further the author notes the need to rediscover the metaphysical framework within which sciences inevitably operate, and the need to root these metaphysical explorations within the neglected field of ontology. From the theological point of view, this makes this text a particularly interesting one within the broader field of philosophical introduction to mind.

The text is let down, however, by very poor binding and typesetting, which leave the book very difficult to read. In addition, there are a few typos (cf, for example, `denotatiing', p234). I was surprised by some of the figures that were not discussed - in the mind-body debate key figures such as Gilbert Ryle, Jaegwon Kim and Malcolm Jeeves are not seriously engaged with. There seems to be a general scepticism toward the value of Wittgenstein, who is barely mentioned in the section of thought and language. The Gifford lectures of John MacMurray are not mentioned at all. Moreover, there is an abiding atheistic supposition which forces the author to assume that the mind emerges as a result of evolutionary forces alone: given the acknowledged inability of evolution alone to account for many of the features of the human mind (evolution offers no solution to the `hard problem'), it is surely essential to explore whether theistic/intelligent design conceptions of mind offer more plausible solutions to some of the problems that atheistic philosophy of mind has battled with for generations.

Notwithstanding these quibbles, this is an excellent text, which comes highly recommended.
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