Customer Reviews


2 Reviews
5 star:
 (1)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Never Mind the Quality, Feel the Width
This book does not claim an objectivity now impossible to achieve. This is one version of events, as valid as any other. Read other works too and come to your own conclusion about these contentious areas.
Published 14 months ago by Media Mogul

versus
11 of 21 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A book marred by ahistorical judgements.
Louise London's survey of the British Governments' attitude towards the Jewish refugees, 1933-48, ostensibly is a highly creditable attempt to synthesise a select portion of the thousands of memorandums produced by Whitehall to form her account. Unfortunately, her work is fundamentally flawed by a refusal, like many other Holocaust Historians dealing with related...
Published on 21 July 2000


Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Never Mind the Quality, Feel the Width, 3 May 2013
This book does not claim an objectivity now impossible to achieve. This is one version of events, as valid as any other. Read other works too and come to your own conclusion about these contentious areas.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 21 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A book marred by ahistorical judgements., 21 July 2000
By A Customer
Louise London's survey of the British Governments' attitude towards the Jewish refugees, 1933-48, ostensibly is a highly creditable attempt to synthesise a select portion of the thousands of memorandums produced by Whitehall to form her account. Unfortunately, her work is fundamentally flawed by a refusal, like many other Holocaust Historians dealing with related areas of British response, to dis-band all hindsight and form proper historical judgements based on what was known, and realistically possible at the time. Therefore, London's contention that the British government was dogged by self interest and caution is seen from the comfortable vantage point of the present, as opposed to what could actually have been achieved then. If one takes her chapter on visa imposition for instance Dr. London feels it more appropriate to knit together a few offical statements which could easily be construed as negative and cautious rather than seeing the broader picture. That is, that after November 1938 the government dramatically liberalised its policy towards the Jews. She does not seem to appreciate the magnitude of the fact that 70% of Germany's Jews came to Britain after this time, in the aftermath of Kristallnacht. As for the British record in war-time, before reading this book turn to W.D. Rubinstein's Myth of Rescue:Why the Democracies could not have saved more Jews from the Nazis. Here you will find a more sensible well-balanced and most importantly, forsaken of all post-holocaust lenses approach. Scholarly dealing with the Holocaust, and the response of the British demands objectivity and a degree of empathy. As far as London's book is concerned, she neglects the latter. Also, more emphasis should have been placed on the role of the British Consular Officials who were in the lion's den that was Nazi Germany, and who held the critical role of facilitating their departure, and of the actions of the British Government in making this a more efficent and far-reaching endeavour. Given the fact that she only donates two pages to this area, there is a major hole which, in a book so wide-ranging, should almost certainly have been filled.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews