Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Summer Savings Up to 25% Off Cloud Drive Photos Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Oasis Learn more Shop now Learn more

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars6
3.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
2
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 9 July 2002
This boook is much better than the other reviews have suggested. One of the other reviewers stated that Williams is opinionated. I certainly don't disagree with that. If you want an introductory book that will present you with the various different positions commonly held in moral philosophy this is not the book for you. But if you accept the book for what it is, Williams' view of morality, presented in a fairly basic way, this is pretty good. I find myself coming back to it a lot.
Having said that, if you are looking for a single introduction to moral philosophy, I would recommend Piers Benn's Ethics.
0Comment|11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 13 May 2013
The book is great, but there are two editions (1993 and 2012), buy the latter as it's 5 pounds cheaper but otherwise the same.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 November 2006
I agree with those reviews below which have stated that this book is opinionated. However, I don't think that it hamstrings the arguments contained within as much as some reviewers seem to believe; whilst I am a philosophy student, I haven't been recommended this book, and wish I had been, as it is an excellent overview (not at all exhaustive though, as Williams himself admits within) of some arguments against current 'trendy' philosophical ideas, e.g. relativism. If some readers found his style obtuse, then I might suggest that they re-read this text, as I found it pretty clear. The title is misleading; not an introduction, but rather a look at some areas which are easily missed. Highly recommended, however.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 December 2009
Bernard Williams was a highly regarded writer and teacher of philosophy. He had a comprehensive knowledge of the subject and obvious insight. Both of these qualities come across in this short but interesting little book about moral philosophy. It definitely made me look at a few old ideas in a slightly new and more interesting way. Unfortunately the book was written, I think, in 1971. Perhaps this is one of the reasons for the slightly ponderous and pompous writing style. Ignore that and focus on the ideas. If you do so, I think you will find this a slightly quirky but worthwhile introduction to the field of ethics.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 December 2000
Tthis book always appears on recommended reading lists for philosophy students.
It is however not the best introduction to philosophy. Williams is extremely opinionated and judgemental in what he writes, for example in his description of the amoralist, there is little foundation for what he writes about this individual except for what appears to be his own opinion which i don't think he's put much thinking into.
However, the faults of what Williams says lead me to make criticisms of it and in making my criticisms i developed my own points of view.
The book is difficult to read, and this is not because the concepts are hard to grasp, but because Williams' style is awkward. It's been coded to appear to contain wisdom, but it doesn't tell you anything new.
If you want to read about morality, and actually enjoy and gain something out of it get Plato's Republic, which is enlightening and extremely entertaining at the same time (what more could you ask for?).
0Comment|5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 November 2001
... It is curious that this book is quite widely recommended as an introduction to moral philosophy. In fact Williams disguises the fact that he has nothing much interesting to say or anything new to add by a long-windedness and turgidity of style thought to make him sound philosophically respectable. (His sentences aren't that long -- they just take remarkable effort to get through.)
Williams is the typical example of someone created by the self-fulfilling world of academic philosophy. Indeed, if you want to read something by someone with a real passion for solving ethical problems, Plato would not be a bad start.
0Comment|3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.