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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Valuable but still controversial
The title of this book is most apt. Singer presents his view of ethics by considering practical situations that may present moral dilemmas. He arranges the chapters so as to provide progressive examples in which he puts forward a coherent, if in places controversial, approach to ethical behaviour. Chapter headings are:

1. About Ethics
2. Equality and its...
Published on 16 July 2008 by Gareth Greenwood

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A not entirely practical set of ethics
I read this as an undergraduate in philosophy over 30 years ago and returned to it as research for my own book of ethics 'Natural Ethics'. There is a lot to be said for the humane aspects of the ethics propounded is this book, but the inherent inhumanity of utilitarianism raises questions as to how 'practical' Singer's ethics are when human beings are not on the whole...
Published 16 months ago by Rickythewiz


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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 3 Nov. 2014
By 
M. King - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Practical Ethics (Paperback)
Simply fascinating. It takes you out of your bubble of small politics and day time TV.
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47 of 70 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ethics - of a sort, 26 Mar. 2001
This review is from: Practical Ethics (Paperback)
In this book, Peter Singer examines core questions of ethics and expounds his own framework for ethical thought, which he describes as "preference utilitarianism". He develops his theory by considering, in turn, some of the most important questions in ethics, concentrating particularly on those dilemmas which involve questions about the moral status of human beings and other creatures. Within his wider "preference utilitarianism", Singer adopts a personhood-based approach to issues of moral status - while he acknowledges that attributes like sentience confer a certain degree of moral considerableness, Singer ultimately regards "persons" (rational, autonomous, self-conscious agents)as the exclusive bearers of "full" moral status. "Persons", for Singer, is a group which includes most adult human beings, great apes (gorillas, chimpanzees and orang-utans), and possibly also other "higher mammals" like dolphins. It excludes "lower" vertebrates, invertebrates, and, controversially, some human beings, including very young children (those who have not yet attained self-consciousness or rationality)and severely mentally-impaired adults (either through mental disability or through degenerative neurological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease). Unsurprisingly, Singer has caused great offence to many people who argue that, by proposing a category of 'human nonpersons' he disregards the moral value of many human beings whose lives should be valued and respected despite severe disabilities. Singer, for his part, argues that to value a life for no other reason that it is a human life would simply be "speciesism" - discrimination in favour of our own species and against others. He claims that when we consider the moral status of humans, apes, etc, the fact of whether a being belongs to our species is no more relevant than whether or not he or she belongs to our race. Personhood theory is, of course, open to wide-ranging attack from advocates of a more "relational" morality and critics of overly-rationalitic, abstract moral theories. Singer, in particular, has been attacked for resurrecting the spectre of Nazi-era policies like non-voluntary euthanasia for those human beings deemed subnormal, or "nonpersons". This criticism obviously hits a nerve - Singer devotes a lengthy appendix of his book to an unconvincing refutation, in which he portrays himself as a much-maligned martyr for free speech.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 5 Sept. 2014
This review is from: Practical Ethics (Paperback)
An excellent book for anyone struggling with modern ethical issues.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 19 Dec. 2014
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This review is from: Practical Ethics (Paperback)
Fantastic book. It was so exciting. I couldn't put it down
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 13 Sept. 2014
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Came quickly and as described
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5.0 out of 5 stars All fine. As described, 5 Aug. 2014
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All fine. As described.
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Practical Ethics
Practical Ethics by Peter Singer (Paperback - 29 Jan. 1993)
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