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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating but Unstructered
Full of mind-blowing and fascinating facts and theories. It's difficult to dismiss the author's proposition that advanced civilisation dates back thousands of years earlier than is currently the "official" view and that these early civilisations may have been virtually wiped out by the catastrophic flooding and volcanic and earthquake activity accompying the ending of the...
Published on 28 Feb 2011 by Miker

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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but not totally convincing
Fingerprints of the Gods seems to be the type of book that is either loved or loathed, either convincing people utterly, or leaving them mocking its credibility. I don't particularly stand in either camp.
Although many of the theories are interesting, and even possible, they are probably not the answers to the mysteries highlighted and the questions asked. Just...
Published on 23 July 2004 by Gryph


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating but Unstructered, 28 Feb 2011
Full of mind-blowing and fascinating facts and theories. It's difficult to dismiss the author's proposition that advanced civilisation dates back thousands of years earlier than is currently the "official" view and that these early civilisations may have been virtually wiped out by the catastrophic flooding and volcanic and earthquake activity accompying the ending of the last Ice Age.

But I do wish the book had been properly edited. It is full of repitition and is not presented in any sort of logical order. It could have been 30% shorter. Nevertherless well worth reading.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but not totally convincing, 23 July 2004
Fingerprints of the Gods seems to be the type of book that is either loved or loathed, either convincing people utterly, or leaving them mocking its credibility. I don't particularly stand in either camp.
Although many of the theories are interesting, and even possible, they are probably not the answers to the mysteries highlighted and the questions asked. Just because there are flaws in accepted Egyptology, that does not mean that a race of super humans built the pyramids.
Hancock raises some very good points, and finds fascinating correlations in the themes of ancient myth. Unfortunately the conclusions he comes up with leave many more questions than you were faced with in the first place, and seem a bit too far fetched to be totally credible. His opinions may point to a different truth than that accepted by the close minded members of the archeological and scientific community, but in taking things too far into the extreme he will not be taken as a credible source by those he seeks to challenge.
The ideas put forward left me with the same feelings I have when reading conspiracy theory websites or books - it all seems possible, but when all weighed up after the event it just all seems too unlikely to wholly believe.
FOTG was definitely an interesting read, but rather than changing my life, as others have stated, it just changed the way I view ancient prehistory and the way it is perceived by modern scholars.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great entertainment, 29 July 2007
By 
Ray Blake (Hemel Hempstead, UK) - See all my reviews
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Whether you subscribe to Hancock's theories or not, there is no denying that this is an excellent read, thoroughly well-researched and written in an engaging and involving way.

Personally, I felt that the book should have sought to ask some of its questions without then feeling the need to speculate wildly to answer them. Nevertheless, it is a fascinating read and this new edition is worth the money even if you have the original.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be compulsory reading!, 29 Nov 2011
By 
T. J. Walton "Tim Walton" (London) - See all my reviews
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This book is so well researched and thought through, it should be compulsory reading. No wild speculation without foundation, but reasoned and realistic. No assumptions passed down and accepted from the ignorant. Open minded and incise.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Never mind Y2K; it's 2012 we need to worry about, 22 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This book is fantastic. Not for those with closed minds, to be sure, but for anyone with an interest in the pyramids, Atlantis, the Incas or the Aztecs or who finds the idea that Western science knows the answers depressing this is essential reading. I have read and re-read this book a dozen times and still have no idea how much of Hancock's theory I believe. But at the end of the day, it's intriguing and, dare I say it, entertaining.
The book opens with mediaeval maps which accurately depict the coastline of Antartica, despite the fact that it's been under miles of ice since the dawn of history. Rattling through flood myths which are pretty much identical all over the world, the mysteries of the lines on the Nazca plain, harbours built miles from the coast, pyramids that we could not build today, the precession of the equinoxes and much more Hancock reaches his conclusion in breathless style. (I would say that the conclusion is startling, but you do pretty much see where he's headed from the off.)
Some people will dismiss the whole book as bunkum, saying that you can twist the facts and suppositions to fit whatever theories you like. And they may well be right. But unlike other books which put the pyramids down to little green men from mars or magic, Hancock offers us a more convincing explanation. Even if you accept the 'conventional' ages of the pyramids, then I just cannot understand why the later ones are falling down while the oldest are still in pretty much perfect nick. The story of civilisations all over the world is that we get better at things as time goes on, not worse.
A fascinating and thought provoking read, with a sobering conclusion. Anyone for an end of the world party round at mine in 2012?
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chilling Finale, 2 Feb 2010
This is about the only book of its type which is convincing enough to leave you worried at the end of it! Without giving anything away, read this with an open mind and try and ignore the one fault ever-present in this author's work: his failure to employ a ruthless editor to trim out the fat and constant repetitions which mar the book's readability.
The theories and alternative explanations of past civilisations and climate change are so well argued that the book still gets five stars. If only Mr Hancock could control his own verbosity, it would merit a 6.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Keep an open mind to all possibilities, 30 Jan 2012
This thought provoking and thorougly absorbing book opens up a history that has been overlooked and ignored for far to long.It's time the archiologists,historians,astronomers and other accademics started to take a closer look at these ideas and put their heads together. Who knows what we my find out about ouselves and the world we inhabit if they do.
A must read book for anyone who dares to question the accepted versions of our ancestry.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars compelling read., 12 Jan 2004
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There will be those who will like a book like this, and there will be those who will never like books that have the capacity of turning one's world view upside down...
It takes an open mind to absorb and evaluate the flood of information presented in this book, a willingness to go beyond what one has learned before as the so-called accepted truth...
It is very much part of the flock-like human character to want to discard the compelling flood of anomalies as irrelevant, dangerous, or worse.
Some comments in these reviews point in that very direction...
Admittely, the book is written from a "let's show established archaeology how it's done" point of view, a little scholar-bashing if you will, but the long list of hints, proofs, hunches, etc. does make one wonder what might lay under thosemiles of ice over Antarctica.
Let's wait and see what the first digs in Antarctica will produce...
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enlightening..., 27 Aug 2006
By 
Duncan Rose "Dunk" (Billingborough, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Fingerprints of Gods (Paperback)
I read this book a few years ago and it inspired me to travel which I have since spent a year of my life doing, during which time I was fortunate enough to visit many of the ancient civilisations' statues and monuments etc. around South America and the Pacific mentioned in the book.

Most of the documented theories in the book cannot be proved, however interestingly enough can also not be disproved by any scientists! I beleive the author Graham Hancock invited his public mockers of the book to a live television debate to which none of them agreed...!

Even if everything discussed in the book is entire fiction it is a work of art and an extremely interesting read which precipitates a plethora of issues to debate.

I've just ordered the sequel... 5/5
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but ultimately pointless, 17 April 2013
By 
J. Stalker "JFS" (London UK) - See all my reviews
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The problem with this book is Hancock's method of selecting information. He constructs some very interesting hypothesis and theories; however these ideas are very hard to entertain and enjoy when you know that he has taken one tiny piece of information that is relevant and supportive of his story from a much larger study, and disregarded the other 99%, which in most cases disproves or discredits his ideas.

For me this book leans far more toward the fiction side rather than fact. The places he visits are real, a small percentage of the information he provides is real, but the vast majority of the theory and ideas in here are complete nonsense.

The frustrating thing is I was really excited about reading this book and I feel let down. It feels someone trying to pull the wool over your eyes when the truth is probably just as interesting as the stories created.

The truth is any one of us could write a fascinating theory on ancient cultures, (or any subject for that matter), if we completely disregarded any factual information and carefully selected snippets which could then be bent with a crowbar to fit our idea.

People saying 'read this with an open-mind' - personally I think that if you are to really enjoy this book you must read it as you would a harry potter novel.
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Fingerprints of the Gods
Fingerprints of the Gods by Graham Hancock (Hardcover - 31 Dec 1995)
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