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on 9 May 2002
The book is divided according to clay types: earthenware, stoneware and porcelain. Each section contains glaze recipes for oxidation and reduction firings. The recipes are fully illustrated with tiles, and information on the quality of the glaze (e.g. matt/satin etc), and what to use the glaze for i.e. domestic, sculptural or decorative ware.
The authors has included sections on raku and soda firing, with a basic description of how each is achieved, and relevant recipes.
However, what really made the book for me, was a gallery of respected ceramicists who describe, briefly, their techniques, and sometimes include a recipe for the specific glaze/s. It helped to put the glazes into the wider context of surface treatment, and provided invaluable inspiration.
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on 14 October 2009
The idea, layout and presentation of this book is excellent. However, I think too many of the stoneware glazes are above 1260 degrees and require a one-hour soak. This is very demanding on a kiln, many of which don't go over this temperature anyway. Also, although it looks as though the book is full of glaze recipes, a closer look shows that often it is the same glaze recipe with minor variations in the stain/oxide addition. This said, it is a great way of learning about glazes, and is ideally laid out for easy understanding. I'm very glad I bought it but wish it was just a bit better.
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on 21 July 2011
All the glazes in this book use nearly the same set of ingredients but in different proportions. This means you can buy in, say 10-20 different raw materials, which are all cheap, and make practically every glaze recipe featured. When you're learning its so useful to use same ingredients over and over in different proportions as you become familiar with how they react to each other, and the effect they have in different ratios to figure out how they work. There are no obscure materials in here, its all basic stuff every pottery supplier will stock.
Quite a few of the earthenware glaze recipes featured are simply a transparent with a coloured stain added (which feels like a bit of a rip off) most of which use lead sesquilicate, so not good for food and not good to breath in. You can probably substitute it for something else, haven't tried this yet though. If you are from ireland or britain its certainly worth getting this book, I bought an american book with this one and have no idea what most of the raw ingredients even are! Great price for it, packed well, delivery was quick enough. happy days.
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on 2 February 2013
Billiant glaze book and ocvers all clays including Raku. I have use some of the recipes and they came out true to the book sample, so really pleased
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on 28 December 2012
This book is excellent value for money. It reads simply and like a cooking recipe book, has a test tile image next to each recipe and is comprehensive in that it offers a taste of glaze opportunities across a wide selection of firing ranges. Where you develop the recipies and tweak for colour depth is up to the progression of the glaze maker, but the initial basics are all in this simple easy to follow guide. I have found it to be a good simple uncluttered teaching aid too.
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on 4 December 2013
As others have said, there actually aren't that many different glaze recipes in this book as most are slight variations on basic recipes. It's nicely produced and organised, but there's an annoying lack of necessary detail if you actually want to use some of the recipes and there's very little discussion of glaze theory.

At about £3 it was good value, and the pictures are nice, but if you're only going to buy one glaze book don't buy this one.
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on 15 August 2002
This is a useful book, well presented and illustrated. Very useful if you are a beginner and need some inspiration and know how. Good guide to basic ingredients and what their purpose is at the beginning. Only annoying thing is why are the leading firing temperatures in degree F, this is 2002 not 1982.
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on 7 August 2015
I use the recipes from this book to teach evening class students to mix glazes. The photos enable them to choose a glaze to aim for and the results have all been good. The range of glazes is very wide and I have found this book to be very handy, and a good visual guide of what can be done with different raw materials.
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on 17 September 2015
Great crafting book for mixing glazes. The majority of recipes rely on colour stains rather than specific oxides etc, but there is enough to keep you busy. Nicely laid out in sections for electric or gas kilns, earthenware or stoneware to provide a quick reference based on colour.
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on 14 September 2014
Very good and useful, loads of recipes with raku, majolica and lustre in there too, however a lot of the recipes use stains, which is a downside for me but i'm sure it wouldn't bother most :)
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