Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
7
4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£16.56+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 8 May 2011
Fascinating study of how artist increasingly have work made for them, ranging from those involved and learning from the `fabricator' to those who are completely detached. Full of intriguing work I wasn't familiar with, he divides it by materials (glass, metal, stone, textiles etc). The feeling of fabricators as master `craft' people is emphasised by this and particularly since painting is not covered. I'm an artist inherently resistant to art conceived by one person but made totally by another (usually unacknowledged) particularly with no understanding of the material by the 'ideas merchant' but I have to say this book gave me much pause for thought. Its undeniable that we are better off with some of the wonderful art shown than without it, and its probably better for having been farmed out to `experts'. Petry tries hard to credit the makers not just the artists which is great and any idea that craft is tame is dispelled by some very edgy and provocative themes. His text is immensely readable, without being dumb, not the usual art-speak babble just clear and straightforward so thank goodness for that. There's far too many flash looking, but totally unreadable books on contemporary art out there. This isn't one of them.
0Comment| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 5 February 2012
'The Art of Not Making" is a study of contemporary art that is dependent for its realisation on expert contributions from artisans. The author, Michael Petry, is a practising artist - a couple of examples of his work are included - and he is well equipped to discuss the work illustrated in the over 300 colour illustrations.

After a contextual introduction, the book has been divided by material: a choice that produces one rather strange consequence, when work in wood finds itself in a final section devoted to 'Other Materials', while glass, metal, stone and textiles - not obviously more difficult or important - earn their own sections. An appendix features interviews with artisans and artists that throw further light on their working relationships.

The work discussed is of a uniformly high standard, and Petry's text makes clear that the relationship between artist and artisan in such work may take many different forms, from almost completely hands-off to intense involvement on the part of the artist. This book makes a coherent case for work of this type. It is hard to imagine the task done better. The wide variety of materials and techniques involved make for a visual feast.
0Comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 June 2011
this book is plush! amazing photos, great selection of work. really interesting in the theory side, vey contemporary and all round a good read. chapters split up by materials such as glass, metal, textile etc
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 April 2012
Really good! A must read!!!, this book explores why artists don't make their work. A good read fr anyone with biased thoughts on not making!
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 March 2015
Love the book and will come back to it over and over.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 22 December 2015
Thank you for the good and useful book!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 January 2015
interesting
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)