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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Desperately needed. We've become rootless.
It's worse - it's almost criminal - than a tragedy that 'myth' has become lately a synonym for 'lie'. Myth is far, far more: it's the symbolism of the human mind, the only way that we can 'see' abstracts, such as loyalty or freedom. Every culture has its mythology: the earlier the myth, the more similar it's likely to be closely like that of even far distant cultures...
Published on 11 Oct 2008 by M.I.

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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Difficult
I found this book very difficult to get into...tried quite a few times on holiday but ended up falling asleep. I'm sure the stories are interesting and i love greek mythology but i just couldn't stay awake long enough.
Published on 22 Oct 2012 by Mr. L. J. Knight


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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Desperately needed. We've become rootless., 11 Oct 2008
By 
M.I. "migoe" (Newcastle, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Heroes of the Greeks (Paperback)
It's worse - it's almost criminal - than a tragedy that 'myth' has become lately a synonym for 'lie'. Myth is far, far more: it's the symbolism of the human mind, the only way that we can 'see' abstracts, such as loyalty or freedom. Every culture has its mythology: the earlier the myth, the more similar it's likely to be closely like that of even far distant cultures. This is clear evidence that the mind needs its myths, its 'archetypal' figures and situations. These are far more, more basic than just children's stories. This poisonous notion cuts us away from our historical and psychological roots.
Kerenyi, the compiler of probably the finest works on mythology of recent times, was a student of the psychologist Jung, who formulated the theory of archetypes. The myths in Jung's work are mainly those of the eastern Mediterranean, still the most familiar. But there are many other bodies of myth, mentioned in passing, for a book can go only so far. There are Celtic, Germanic, Aboriginal, Arctic and many other mythologies too - surprisingly similar in many ways to those of the Greeks. This alone bears out the archetype theory. And one strange feature of mythology: in my experience, in the darkest of times, it's always been a help to read the familiar stories over and over again. Somewhere in there, you're practically certain to find yourself too, and your problems.
Are they history or parables? It seems to vary - yet it scarcely matters. The story itself counts, historical or not. This (Kerenyi) was the source of Mary Renault's original works, The King Must Die etc.
So, get back to your roots: read Kerenyi - and Renault.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Difficult, 22 Oct 2012
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Mr. L. J. Knight "Lewis Knight" (The Netherlands) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Heroes of the Greeks (Paperback)
I found this book very difficult to get into...tried quite a few times on holiday but ended up falling asleep. I'm sure the stories are interesting and i love greek mythology but i just couldn't stay awake long enough.
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The Heroes of the Greeks by H. L. Rose (Paperback - 13 Mar 1978)
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