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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Fantastic Book for an Introduction to Tsarism
I found this book to be clear, concise and straight forward. It deals with the lives of the occupants of Russia's imperial throne with an easily understandible style and tone, which is refreshing for a book on the Romanovs. Having said that at times the language is inclined to be clinical and rather too simplistic.
Although this book does deal with the sensational...
Published on 9 Jun. 2002

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Not much information but good interesting book!
This Chronicle of Russian tsars book is not having deep information but very good short history with good imaginations and description so it is suitable for interesting history lover.
At least I am fan of Chronicle series history books such as Chronicle of Roman emperors.

Worth good buy
Published 9 months ago by Jon


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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Fantastic Book for an Introduction to Tsarism, 9 Jun. 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Chronicle of the Russian Tsars: The Reign-by-Reign Record of the Rulers of Imperial Russia (Chronicles) (Hardcover)
I found this book to be clear, concise and straight forward. It deals with the lives of the occupants of Russia's imperial throne with an easily understandible style and tone, which is refreshing for a book on the Romanovs. Having said that at times the language is inclined to be clinical and rather too simplistic.
Although this book does deal with the sensational scandals which have often haunted the Imperial Throne, it does not get pulled into the more rediculous of these, such as the obsurd notion thar Catherine the Great slept with horses.
As with most of the books from this series, if you want a good general overview of the subject then this book is ideal but for a more indepth account a book such as "The Romanovs:Autocrats of All the Russias" by W.Bruce Lincoln would make this book appear childish.
Of all the books I have read from this series I enjoyed this one the most. The fact that there have only been a small amount of Tsars, in comparison to other subjects the series have covered works to this books advantage and means that briefness is not a too much of a problem here. I would heartily recomend this book to anyone with a curiousity for Russian Imperial history.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars very readable account, 28 Aug. 2011
By 
sally tarbox (aylesbury bucks uk) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Richly illustrated volume begins with a background to tsarism - the princes of Muscovy & Novgorod who preceded it. Then takes the reader from 1462-1918, featuring each tsar in turn, with fascinating eye witness accounts from envoys who visited them and explanations of the wars and revolts that took place. There's also little side articles on relevant matters, such as who were the Cossacks? Interesting and very readable
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Russian Tsars, 8 Aug. 2010
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I bought this book for my husband and he is delighted with it. He said it is very interesting and gives him all the information about the Tsars. We had visited St. Petersburg recently and he became very interested to learn about the history having seen some of the Palaces and heard the commentary from the guides.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well worth a place on the coffee table, 2 May 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Chronicle of the Russian Tsars: The Reign-by-Reign Record of the Rulers of Imperial Russia (Chronicles) (Hardcover)
A good general read, introducing the lineage and history of the Russian royal line. Beautiful pictures, time-lines and clear, informative text make this an ideal coffee table book for those interested in the broad sweep of Imperial Russia's history.
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5.0 out of 5 stars La Russie des Tsars, 15 Jun. 2011
Ce livre n'est pas encore disponible en français. Pour tout adepte de l'histoire russe ce livre est incontournable: il traite de tous les tsars, hommes et femmes, qui ont regné sur cet empire vaste. Il décrit les origines du tsarisme et le contexte culturel et historique de chaque règne. C'est à lire, «l'Atlas historique de la Russie» (de John Channon, traduit en français) à portée.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not much information but good interesting book!, 7 Jun. 2014
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This Chronicle of Russian tsars book is not having deep information but very good short history with good imaginations and description so it is suitable for interesting history lover.
At least I am fan of Chronicle series history books such as Chronicle of Roman emperors.

Worth good buy
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5.0 out of 5 stars I feel that I understand current events in Eastern Europe much better as a result of reading this book, 20 Feb. 2015
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A really interesting book on a history of which I was previously largely ignorant. I feel that I understand current events in Eastern Europe much better as a result of reading this book. Countries do tend to be the product if their history.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Russian History, 27 Feb. 2015
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This review is from: Chronicle of the Russian Tsars: The Reign-by-Reign Record of the Rulers of Imperial Russia (Chronicles) (Hardcover)
Excellent book on Russian History but it needs to be updated.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Russian Roulette, 6 Nov. 2009
By 
Neutral "Phil" (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Following the Soviet Revolution of 1917 the Bolsheviks tried to persuade the British government to grant political asylum to the Tsar, Nicholas the Second and his family. This was turned down by George V who was advised such a course of action would discredit the monarchy in the eyes of the labour movement. Less than a year later the Romanov family were murdered at Ekaterinburg on orders from Moscow. Eighty years to the day on 17 July 1998 the remains of the family were re-buried in the Peter and Paul Cathedral. Their memory had outlasted the Soviet Union.

The first Russian state emerged in the late ninth century and was based on Kiev. Its rulers were Scandinavian in origin although its population was Slavic. In the thirteen century the Tartars invaded and provided Russia with an autocracy which translated into Tsardom, although some historians attribute this to the influence of Kiev and Byzantium. In the centuries which followed Moscovy gradually assumed greater power with military victory over the Tartars.

The foundations of the Russian empire were laid by Ivan the Great (a member of the Rurikid family) who ruled from 1462 to 1505. The Tartars were defeated and by 1500 a number of princes who were subjects of the grand duke of Lithuania (a far larger dukedom than the current country with that name) transferred allegiance to Moscow on the grounds that they were being persecuted for their Orthodox faith. Such expansion required certainty of succession and it was characteristic that Tsars would dispose of wives who were unable to produce children, often to spend their days in nunneries sometimes to die violently. In 1503 Ivan abandoned plans to take over church lands leading to the integration of the Orthodox church and the Muscovite state which lasted until 1917.

This was to prove important in the rise of the Romanov dynasty. The Rurikid dynasty ended in 1598 and for sixteen years Russia endured a "Time of Troubles" when there were several claimants to the throne. The Romanov's were distantly related to the Rurikids and, although they could not claim direct ancestry, were sufficiently close to be offered the throne. They provided stability by means of a combination of carrot and stick with more stick than carrot. In 1649 Serfdom was finally established and, although Peter The Great was regarded as progressive (and at six foot seven who would argue with him!), he retained a ruthlessness which saw his son killed after being interrogated on his orders.

Tsarism reached its zenith between 1725 and 1825. Catherine who ruled from 1725 to 1727 "devoted herself mainly to the pleasures of the table and the bedroom and to indulging her desire for revenge". Her successors, especially Elizabeth, were castigated during Soviet rule as epitomising "the corruption of an imperial court whose luxuries depended on the exploitation of millions of serfs". Contemporaries described her as "disordered and wilful" and she had more dresses than Imelda Marcos had shoes. Yet she was opposed to the death penalty, spared the lives of political offenders, restricted political torture and abolished facial mutilation as a punishment for women.

The problem for the Tsars was balancing the various interests within the country while maintaining absolute control, often through a brutal internal police force. The last four Romanovs were faced with the same problem. The "empire could only be maintained by modernising the economy and administration but (this) involved the emergence of an educated class likely to question the existing system and to aspire to a role in government". Reforms were made. Alexander the Second emancipated the Serfs but was assassinated by members of the politically excluded middle class who belonged to The People's Will. Attempts to combine repression with reform alienated both conservatives and the liberal intelligentsia, leaving neither satisfied with the monarchy as it was. Revolutionary movements spread with the Bolsheviks' ruthlessness winning the day and the Romanovs paying the price.

This book is a wonderful introduction to Russian history. It names its sources and includes a superb range of pictures relating to the reign of the Tsars being written about. There are plenty of sidebars and inserts to explain particular issues or terms, genealogical relationships and observations from contemporaries who were serving foreign powers at the Russian court. There are over 200 illustrations and in depth biographical accounts of all the tsars. There's a useful bibliography for those who wish to read in greater depth. Having read this book, I'm sure many will.
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