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4.4 out of 5 stars49
4.4 out of 5 stars
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on 9 December 2005
My brother and I were given a copy of this by an Austrian aunt when we were children and we loved this book. I bought it for my sons (age 6 & 8) and they feel much the same. It is not perhaps a good choice for the easily frightened or very sensitive child but if your target audience like Dahl or Snikett then they will have no problems with the content. The poems are honest, clever, great fun and most have a lesson you would want your child to think about. The illustrations are fabulous. This is a classic that unites the generations in my family. Intelligent and accessible with a good dose of the macarbre. Highly recommended.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 8 October 2014
I was brought up on Struwwelpeter - a series of hilarious 'morality rhymes' for children from 1840s Germany. Who could forget 'Fidgety Phil' pulling the tablecloth and all its contents onto his head? ("Table oh so bare, and ah! Poor Papa and poor Mama Look quite cross, and wonder how They shall make their dinner now.") Or chubby Augustus who wouldn't eat his soup and met a sticky end ("He's like a little bit of thread, and on the fifth day - he was dead!")
More grotesque is the Long Red Legged Scissorman who cuts off Conrad's thumbs when he sucks them ("Mama had scarcely turned her back, the thumb was in, Alas! Alack!")
But 21st century readers may have more sympathy with the hare who runs off with the hunter's gun and turns it on him; the boys who mock a black child and are dipped in a huge bottle of ink by 'Great Agrippa', and the dog who bites Cruel Frederick, then eats his dinner.
24 utterly unforgettable pages. I would certainly disagree with reviewers who think it's too bloodthirsty for children (I adored it - I got my book aged around 8), and have just bought a copy for my granddaughter.
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on 14 March 2000
I have been a fan of Struwwelpeter for many years and have a very early English edition which has been passed down through the family. I particularly like this edition as it gives a brief but interesting biography of the author and history of the book. As a child I was always fascinated by the rhymes and I think they should be read to every girl and boy!
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on 20 April 1998
Cautionary tales written and illustrated by a German psychiatrist over 150 years ago continue to alarum children and amuse parents. Racial intolerance is the target in "The Inky Boys," vicious acts in "Cruel Frederick," and of course hygiene in the title story "Shock-Headed Peter.".
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on 18 April 2015
Dad bought this book for me back in the mid-1970s, when I was around six or seven and I found it both fascinating and a little scary at the time, especially the pictures of the Thumb-Sucker having had his fingers cut off by a wandering tailor with a pair of giant scissors. Don't habitually suck your thumbs, kiddies! Struwwelpeter (1845) aka Shockheaded Peter is a book containing morals for potentially naughty children. Each tale is rhymed and is accompanied by fairly graphic images.

Tale One
This is the story the book title is taken from and tells of Struwwelpeter, and unkempt boy is remains unpopular because of his slovenly grooming habits.
Tale Two
The Story of Bad Frederick, in which a violent bully of a boy terrorizes people and animals until he is bitten rather badly by a dog, one of his potential victims.
Tale Three
The Dreadful Story of the Matches sees a girl who refuses to stop playing with matches burned to death.
Tale Four
The Story of the Black Boys: three boys are making fun of a coloured boy and a caught by Saint Nicholas, who dips each one in a giant pot of ink to teach them a lesson.
Tale Five
The Story of the Wild Huntsman is the only tale no directly involving children. In this one a hare filches the hunters musket and glasses and reverses the situation by hunting the hunter.
Tale Six
The Story of the Thumb-Sucker as described in the beginning of this review.
Tale Seven
The Story of the Soup-Kaspar: Kaspar is a robust young boy who one day decides he will no longer eat his soup and steadily wastes away to a skeleton of a boy before he dies.
Tale Eight
The Story of Fidgety Philip is about a boy who cannot sit still. He eventually, though accidentally, knocks all the food on the floor one day, much to the annoyance his parents.
Tale Nine
The Story of Johnny Head-in-Air tells of a boy who walks around all day refusing to look where he is going, his head constantly tilted up to the sky. One day he walks right into a deep river.
Tale Ten
The Story of the Flying Robert: Robert goes out of the house during a big storm and the wind catches his umbrella. He is propelled into the air and sails off into the distance.

I remember taking the book to primary school and the teacher asking if she could read some of the stories to the whole class. I hate to think of the nightmares some of them may have had. Still, I thought it was a pretty cool book and a pretty cool present.
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on 27 April 2013
I grew up as a young boy in a home without television......but stacks of books and this was just one amongst the many I used to read through as a little boy. The illustrations are curiously dated and funny now but the one of 'Shock headed Peter' used to give me nightmares! Didn't stop me from growing my own hair long though as a rebel teenager of the 60s!

I bought this for my two year old Grandson to pass on some of my crazy childhood memories. As with many childrens books from that era it was written and illustrated with a message of what can become of 'naughty boys'!
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on 11 March 2013
I had this book when I was little and when I saw it at a museum I decided to nip on Amazon and buy it for my children. The pictures are hilarious and the scary wording of the Victorian warnings and morals disguised as poetry had my children in stitches!
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on 12 September 2009
Was thrilled with my copy of Stuwwelpeter. The stories and illustrations were exactly as I remembered them in my childhood - evoked lots of wonderful memories, thank you. Booked was despatched promptly and in perfect condition and I was reading it within a few days of having placed the order.
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on 22 May 2009
This is a true classic. I am ancient and I had the book when I was a child. Now I will give it to an 8 year old boy who loves stamping on frogs but is learning its not nice.
I am only sorry it seems to be unavailable in hardback, as its a book one wants to keep for ever.
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on 14 November 2009
I remember this from my 1950s childhood, so good to find it still available. Not for sensitive small children, but for those of more robust disposition it's great fun!
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