Customer Reviews


28 Reviews
5 star:
 (19)
4 star:
 (6)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


36 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Go on... ...give it a go...
I urge you to read this insightful book. It's short and is very easy to read yet will give you a tangible way of contemplating further dimensions by reference to a society with only two (hence the title 'Flatland'). This [Dover Thrift Edition] could well be the best ever spend on a present for your head! The only negative for me is the book's portrayal of Women as...
Published on 10 Jan 2005

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing
It sounded a bit obscure, which is why I bought it, but it turns out not in a good way.
Published 11 months ago by Fiona Mathison


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

36 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Go on... ...give it a go..., 10 Jan 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Dover Thrift) (Paperback)
I urge you to read this insightful book. It's short and is very easy to read yet will give you a tangible way of contemplating further dimensions by reference to a society with only two (hence the title 'Flatland'). This [Dover Thrift Edition] could well be the best ever spend on a present for your head! The only negative for me is the book's portrayal of Women as straight lines with pointy ends(!), but you have to take into account that it was written by a Victorian Cleric and this part of the story presents an interesting aside in terms of a view of Victorian Society. Please don't get hung up on this point though - in every other way it is incredibly contemporary, accessible and stimulating to the mind. It is referenced by many leading popular science books and is superior to most (incredible considering its vintage). It certainly represents an essential addition to your bookshelf! I'm sure you won't be disappointed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Open your mind, 16 May 2004
By 
Mad Saint Uden "Mad Saint Uden - it's an anagram" (Kent - UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Dover Thrift) (Paperback)
Some science books make stuff seem complicated. Even more compliacted than it needs to be. This book, does not. This is an excellent example of a book being able to open your mind to wider possiblities by explaining stuff you already know about insticivly but have never put into words yourself. Although this book is not for the expert, it is ideal for someone just getting going or needing the chance to recap the basics.
It had me thinking for weeks.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Charming Yarn!, 12 Oct 2002
This review is from: Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Dover Thrift) (Paperback)
That better understanding comes from simplicity is well known. But this axiom is taken to new heights here!
On the one level this is a cool and very amusing exposee of dimensionality. But on another far more fascinating level, it is a brilliant critique of humanity - of society and its norms and rules. How ridiculous our behaviour must look to beings eyeing us from a 4th dimension!
This book is not just intelligent, it is also funny!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Historical science?, 5 Jun 2006
By 
N. Ball "holographicdoctor" (London England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Dover Thrift) (Paperback)
This is a book that took complex ideas and presented them well at a time when the science was not widely understood. Written as a satire on the victorian society where the author lived it still chalenges some of our modern prejudices.

Consider also reading Flatterland by Ian Stewart, which brings the ideas into a modern context
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Definitely not an allegorical 'Life of Christ', 18 July 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Dover Thrift) (Paperback)
I think the hundreds of reviews preceding this one sum up the book pretty well, so I won't recap it all here. I just wanted to point out that the reviewer who thought that Flatland was a religious allegory, with the Sphere as Jesus has defintely missed the point - Sphere is one of a line (no pun intended) of all too fallible and very much human characters who we meet in the book, illustrating one of its sharpest ironic points (I just can't help myself now).
The first is the Point, utterly convinced, in the teeth of all the evidence, of the non-existence of everything but itself. Then we meet (in a dream) the King of Lineland, who prefers to believe that the Square is a mutant woman, rather than believe in a two-dimensional space (I promise I'm not making this up). Then we have A. Square, our narrator, who has to be forced to accept the reality of three dimensions by being forcibly removed from Flatland.
And, almost at the end of the book, the Sphere, who, until now has seemed to represent enlightened wisdom, shows his own flaws, by reacting angrily and petulantly to the suggestion of fourth, fifth or higher dimensions.
The Sphere is definitely not meant to be divine - he's just as limited in vision as all the other characters. I hardly think that a clergyman would be so unflattering about Jesus.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantasy, society criticism and religion in one book., 8 Oct 2009
By 
Jan Janikovic - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Dover Thrift) (Paperback)
This is an extraordinary book and once you read it you'll try to count how many points, lives, squares and cubes would a hypercube (tesseract) consist of.

The book is very thin and it can be comfortably read in one day. In order to introduce the reader to 2D world, author starts to describe the society, rules and manners of that world. Between the lines he thus provide a small criticism on our human society vy showing some issues from other point of view. When a sphere comes to preach the word about new dimension to Square, who is the narrator of the story, Square has huge problems of visualizing the third dimension, until he sees it on his own eyes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars uniquely brilliant, 22 Aug 2007
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Dover Thrift) (Paperback)
A. Square (!), trying to work out what it might be like as a cube, while we of 3 dimensions watch him and ultimately pine with him for even more dimensions. The author is clearly barmy, and a legend. And not only does it leave you in a happily confused state of mind, trying desperately to understand the nature of space, there's also some hilarious satire, and purely inspired explanations for how the whole thing would work. Although the style is sometimes difficult to follow, and it is a bit too short, Flatland is certainly worth a read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spellbinding!, 27 Nov 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Dover Thrift) (Paperback)
If you've ever tried to imagine a "fourth" (or even higher) dimension, this little gem is for you.
Square is an inhabitant of an infinite flat plane (hence the title of the book) whose inhabitants, flat shapes, are totally unaware of the existence of a third "upward" dimension completely different from their north-south and east-west ones. Sphere, from our world, views Flatlanders as ignorant, and tries to show Square the delights of higher dimensions, as well as showing him the "squalor" of his lower dimensional "lineland" and "pointland" cousins...
There is a delightful class system which ranks flatlanders according to how many sides they have (circles are regarded as the highest class of clergymen) but all women are straight lines, indicating the somewhat Victorian outlook of the author. Also interesting is Sphere's hypocritical reluctance to accept a fourth dimension, as Square refused to accept a third.
Charming and simple, this book really makes you think about the nature of space itself (not an easy task!)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A little gem of a book, 21 Feb 2012
This review is from: Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Dover Thrift) (Paperback)
Flatland is a short, clever story that with great efficiency manages to teach some geometry, critique social values (of the period) and entertain all at once.

It is the descriptions of how the various dimensions appear to the others that I found to be really effective. Not just geometrically but also how lower dimensions are interpreted by individuals in higher ones and the other way round too.

The way beings of different dimensions appear to one another, as being superior or inferior, is reflected in the way the society of the 2 dimensional flatland is organised, with those beings having more sides being higher up in society than those with less.

Women get a raw deal, being mere lines, but i saw this as a rather clever consicous effort to create a satire on the way women were seen in society at the time of the book, rather than simply reflecting it.

Finally the fear of the unknown and the covering up of discovered facts by those in power is touched on and is as relevant now as ever.

Overall it is certainly worth reading and packs a lot into a short read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome, 22 Nov 2011
This review is from: Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Dover Thrift) (Paperback)
Loved this book. Amazingly unique idea, combining geometry, political satire and reflecting on the human condition. The most heroic attempt to help conceptualize different numbers of dimensions I have ever seen.

I was only sad that the square didn't fall in love with the sphere. That would have absolutely made it for me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Dover Thrift)
Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Dover Thrift) by Edwin A. Abbott (Paperback - 14 Dec 1992)
2.25
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews