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on 4 July 2010
This is the book on mathematics I have been hoping to find for many years.

For a non-mathematician who wants to get a good functioning overview and practical understanding of the whole subject this book is perfect. The book takes a historical and philosophical approach taking us from the Egyptians, Babylonians, Greeks, Hindus and Arabs up to the modern era and Einstein. However, despite all of the fascinating background historical information, this is not a history of mathematics, it is a real mathematics book and is full of clear examples of problems and additional exercises (with answers).

The book progresses from logic, to arithmetic, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, statistics, probability, and non-Euclidian geometries.

The book is also rich on its discussions of mathematical applications and goes into some depth regarding astronomy, painting and perspective, physical laws of motion and gravity, and music.

Morris Kline was Emeritus Professor of Math and New York University. The book was first published in 1967 and is a real classic.
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on 24 September 1996
A Fantastic piece of literature. It is a guide to an amazing
new world for those of us, who will never become the next
Fermat or Gauss. Kline writes in such a way that you are
drawn into the whole mathematic principle, from history to
thought processes all of the time keeping the reader aware
of the implication of this new concept on our reality.
Brillant!!!!
0Comment|10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 February 2014
The author reawoke my love for mathematics. Reading his book is akin to having an excellent teacher by your side, doing mathematics together. I used this book to review high school mathematics, but I got a lot more out of it.

There are many good exercises, which are easy enough for someone who knows elementary algebra. But that is not the only reason you should buy the book. The math is embedded in its historical context; it's this mix of elegant prose and exercises which makes this book invaluable.
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on 18 July 2015
The book is a journey through the all major human conceptual and analytical thinking that have more than anything else shaped our modern day world and at the same time it can serve as a manual for self-study. This rather unusual approach to his subject is doubtlessly a work of art in itself and can only increase our appreciation for Mathematics, that some modern-day physicists are proclaiming to be only substantial reality behind the Universe and phenomenon of existence...
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on 29 October 2014
A really well written book - very well explained with lots of interesting examples.
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VINE VOICEon 29 April 2015
If you were expecting math theory without the math or an opportunity to replace algebra with arithmetic tricks then you will be sorely disappointed.

Like his earlier book "Mathematic s: a cultural approach) this is a sneaky way to introduce liberal arts students to the world of mathematics by showing them a practical approach. Don't by any means mistake this for what it is not; it is not a way to cut corners as by the time you finish this book you will been introduced to just about every phase of mathematics and geometry.

Although it can be a fun approach, you will need to be prepared to learn some stuff about things such as theory of gravity.

It starts off with the historical orientation to math and why math is important.

To give you an idea of the simplicity of this book here is a sample of the contents:

a historical orientation
logic and mathematics
number: the fundamental concept
algebra, the higher arithmetic
the nature and use of Euclidean geometry
charting the earth and the heavens
the mathematical order of nature
the awakening of Europe
mathematics and painting in the Renaissance
projective geometry
coordinate geometry
the simplest formulas in action
parametric equations and curvilinear motion
the application of formulas to gravitation
the differential calculus
the integral calculus
trigonometric functions and oscillatory motion
the trigonometric analysis of musical sounds
non-Euclidean geometries and their significance
arithmetic's and their algebras
the statistical approach to the social and biological sciences
the theory of probability
nature and the values of mathematics

As you can see you're in for a lot of fun especially if you liked mathematics for non-mathematicians. Ha!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 11 April 2015
If you were expecting math theory without the math or an opportunity to replace algebra with arithmetic tricks then you will be sorely disappointed.

Like his earlier book "Mathematic s: a cultural approach) this is a sneaky way to introduce liberal arts students to the world of mathematics by showing them a practical approach. Don't by any means mistake this for what it is not; it is not a way to cut corners as by the time you finish this book you will been introduced to just about every phase of mathematics and geometry.

Although it can be a fun approach, you will need to be prepared to learn some stuff about things such as theory of gravity.

It starts off with the historical orientation to math and why math is important.

To give you an idea of the simplicity of this book here is a sample of the contents:

a historical orientation
logic and mathematics
number: the fundamental concept
algebra, the higher arithmetic
the nature and use of Euclidean geometry
charting the earth and the heavens
the mathematical order of nature
the awakening of Europe
mathematics and painting in the Renaissance
projective geometry
coordinate geometry
the simplest formulas in action
parametric equations and curvilinear motion
the application of formulas to gravitation
the differential calculus
the integral calculus
trigonometric functions and oscillatory motion
the trigonometric analysis of musical sounds
non-Euclidean geometries and their significance
arithmetic's and their algebras
the statistical approach to the social and biological sciences
the theory of probability
nature and the values of mathematics

As you can see you're in for a lot of fun especially if you liked mathematics for non-mathematicians. Ha!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 10 April 2015
If you were expecting math theory without the math or an opportunity to replace algebra with arithmetic tricks then you will be sorely disappointed.

Like his earlier book "Mathematic s: a cultural approach) this is a sneaky way to introduce liberal arts students to the world of mathematics by showing them a practical approach. Don't by any means mistake this for what it is not; it is not a way to cut corners as by the time you finish this book you will been introduced to just about every phase of mathematics and geometry.

Although it can be a fun approach, you will need to be prepared to learn some stuff about things such as theory of gravity.

It starts off with the historical orientation to math and why math is important.

To give you an idea of the simplicity of this book here is a sample of the contents:

a historical orientation
logic and mathematics
number: the fundamental concept
algebra, the higher arithmetic
the nature and use of Euclidean geometry
charting the earth and the heavens
the mathematical order of nature
the awakening of Europe
mathematics and painting in the Renaissance
projective geometry
coordinate geometry
the simplest formulas in action
parametric equations and curvilinear motion
the application of formulas to gravitation
the differential calculus
the integral calculus
trigonometric functions and oscillatory motion
the trigonometric analysis of musical sounds
non-Euclidean geometries and their significance
arithmetic's and their algebras
the statistical approach to the social and biological sciences
the theory of probability
nature and the values of mathematics

As you can see you're in for a lot of fun especially if you liked mathematics for non-mathematicians. Ha!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 8 April 2015
If you were expecting math theory without the math or an opportunity to replace algebra with arithmetic tricks then you will be sorely disappointed.

Like his earlier book "Mathematic s: a cultural approach) this is a sneaky way to introduce liberal arts students to the world of mathematics by showing them a practical approach. Don't by any means mistake this for what it is not; it is not a way to cut corners as by the time you finish this book you will been introduced to just about every phase of mathematics and geometry.

Although it can be a fun approach, you will need to be prepared to learn some stuff about things such as theory of gravity.

It starts off with the historical orientation to math and why math is important.

To give you an idea of the simplicity of this book here is a sample of the contents:

a historical orientation
logic and mathematics
number: the fundamental concept
algebra, the higher arithmetic
the nature and use of Euclidean geometry
charting the earth and the heavens
the mathematical order of nature
the awakening of Europe
mathematics and painting in the Renaissance
projective geometry
coordinate geometry
the simplest formulas in action
parametric equations and curvilinear motion
the application of formulas to gravitation
the differential calculus
the integral calculus
trigonometric functions and oscillatory motion
the trigonometric analysis of musical sounds
non-Euclidean geometries and their significance
arithmetic's and their algebras
the statistical approach to the social and biological sciences
the theory of probability
nature and the values of mathematics
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 8 April 2015
If you were expecting math theory without the math or an opportunity to replace algebra with arithmetic tricks then you will be sorely disappointed.

Like his earlier book "Mathematic s: a cultural approach) this is a sneaky way to introduce liberal arts students to the world of mathematics by showing them a practical approach. Don't by any means mistake this for what it is not; it is not a way to cut corners as by the time you finish this book you will been introduced to just about every phase of mathematics and geometry.

Although it can be a fun approach, you will need to be prepared to learn some stuff about things such as theory of gravity.

It starts off with the historical orientation to math and why math is important.

To give you an idea of the simplicity of this book here is a sample of the contents:

a historical orientation
logic and mathematics
number: the fundamental concept
algebra, the higher arithmetic
the nature and use of Euclidean geometry
charting the earth and the heavens
the mathematical order of nature
the awakening of Europe
mathematics and painting in the Renaissance
projective geometry
coordinate geometry
the simplest formulas in action
parametric equations and curvilinear motion
the application of formulas to gravitation
the differential calculus
the integral calculus
trigonometric functions and oscillatory motion
the trigonometric analysis of musical sounds
non-Euclidean geometries and their significance
arithmetic's and their algebras
the statistical approach to the social and biological sciences
the theory of probability
nature and the values of mathematics

As you can see you're in for a lot of fun especially if you liked mathematics for non-mathematicians. Ha!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

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