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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent reference book.
This book has been hard to find in the hardcover edition, since it was originally privately printed. Dover has done their usual great job in producing this edition, and making it available at a price well within the budget of every magic lover and performer.

The book contains enough information to take the beginner through his/her paces to become a...
Published on 17 April 1997

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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting read, but hardly a guide for beginners.
This book was certainly an interesting read, but as for tips for practical/street magicians, this really won't help you much.
If you're looking to don a stage in a top hat and pull bunnies and hankerchiefs from your sleeves then go buy this, you'll probably love it.
But if, like me, you want to learn sleight of hand routines (coin vanishes, card productions,...
Published on 4 Jan 2005 by T. Hart


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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent reference book., 17 April 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Sleight of Hand: Practical Manual of Legerdemain for Amateurs and Others (Dover Magic Books) (Paperback)
This book has been hard to find in the hardcover edition, since it was originally privately printed. Dover has done their usual great job in producing this edition, and making it available at a price well within the budget of every magic lover and performer.

The book contains enough information to take the beginner through his/her paces to become a finger-flinger capable of amazing audiences of lay people (and some magicians, too) using borrowed props. Not only actual sleight of hand moves, but actual routines built on the sleights and subterfuge are explained, and in many cases, illustrated with clear diagrams.

Not only is this an excellent introduction to the art of magic without gimmics (some call sleight of hand "pure" magic), but it will also serve as the cornerstone of the magician's working library. Ask a performer to name classic texts on magic, and this title will be one of the ones included. Magazine articles in the conjuring periodicals will often cite a particular sleight that appears within these pages. For that reason alone, a copy of Sachs' treatise is recommended.

Submitted by: Brett McCarron ([...]
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good old fashioned magic, 2 April 2010
By 
Paul Solomons (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Sleight of Hand: Practical Manual of Legerdemain for Amateurs and Others (Dover Magic Books) (Paperback)
This book is a great instructional manual for anyone wishing to learn sleight of hand magic. The language is a little old-fashioned, but that merely adds to the atmosphere, building up an image of the author as a Victorian, top-hatted, wand-waving magician of the old days.

Edwin Sachs is passionate about sleight of hand being an art, referring to other magic that invloves mechanical props in fairly derogatory terms. Sleight of hand is primarily about the skill and dexterity of the magician.

There are lots of great tricks and techniques explained in the book. However, with only a few illustrations dotted around, some of them can be difficult to visualise on a first reading.

As well as simple palming of coins and cards, there are lots of bigger, more involved (and audacious) illusions, including the classic pulling a rabbit from a hat. There are also several tricks that involve pricking your volunteers with pins - probably best left alone in view of today's litigious society.

All-in-all, a really fun book. I've seen many far more user-friendly magic books, but this one has an old-fashioned charm that every magic enthusiast should enjoy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book, 29 Jan 2013
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This review is from: Sleight of Hand: Practical Manual of Legerdemain for Amateurs and Others (Dover Magic Books) (Paperback)
First published in 1885, this book contains routines and effects very few modern magicians would think of. Within half an hour into reading this, new and strong ideas had come in my mind. Absolutely great for magicians at all levels.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent for anyone wanting to get into advanced magic, 3 April 2001
This review is from: Sleight of Hand: Practical Manual of Legerdemain for Amateurs and Others (Dover Magic Books) (Paperback)
Although written about 100 years ago most of the sleights n' tricks are still used today, this is great for anyone looking to become serious about magic.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting read, but hardly a guide for beginners., 4 Jan 2005
By 
T. Hart (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Sleight of Hand: Practical Manual of Legerdemain for Amateurs and Others (Dover Magic Books) (Paperback)
This book was certainly an interesting read, but as for tips for practical/street magicians, this really won't help you much.
If you're looking to don a stage in a top hat and pull bunnies and hankerchiefs from your sleeves then go buy this, you'll probably love it.
But if, like me, you want to learn sleight of hand routines (coin vanishes, card productions, etc) then you're probably better off buying a JB BOBO book or something similar...In fact, why not buy a DVD instead? You can check the angles on there and everything is explained step by step, and reading a book written in 1888 might not be the most stimulating or informative read.
The language is obviously dated, which can be a put off to the younger reader, also the tricks detailed aren't really anything that you can't find in more up to date books.
My recommendation, buy this if you're a completist, otherwise find something a little newer or simply buy a DVD - with things as visual as street magic you're probably better off.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great read, 2 Sep 2013
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This review is from: Sleight of Hand: Practical Manual of Legerdemain for Amateurs and Others (Dover Magic Books) (Paperback)
Coin tricks use out dated coins but the theory is still there. Excellent for beginners to wow your friends! Definitely recommend
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