Customer Reviews


14 Reviews
5 star:
 (3)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (5)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Read to enjoy, not to impress your friends
To respond to the previous writer's criticism: The reason this book lacks a coherent, logical structure is that it is a collection of essays. Consequently, one should not be surprised that it is not nicely tied together by an introduction and conclusion.
I seldom agree with Baudrillard, not least because I am never too certain how seriously (given his anti-academic...
Published on 23 Jun 2004

versus
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A simulation of communication and the subsequent implosion of meaning!
Baudrillard takes 164 pages of dense writing to propose unsubstantiated claims that could have been written over ten pages at the most, as if he were paid by the word. He frequently invents words and creates new definitions for already existing ones.

My favourite passage:

`Nihilism no longer wears the dark, Wagnerian, Senglerian, fuliginous colors of...
Published on 27 Mar 2010 by Lucas Muller


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A simulation of communication and the subsequent implosion of meaning!, 27 Mar 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Simulacra and Simulation (The Body in Theory: Histories of Cultural Materialism) (Paperback)
Baudrillard takes 164 pages of dense writing to propose unsubstantiated claims that could have been written over ten pages at the most, as if he were paid by the word. He frequently invents words and creates new definitions for already existing ones.

My favourite passage:

`Nihilism no longer wears the dark, Wagnerian, Senglerian, fuliginous colors of the end of the century. It no longer comes from a weltanschuung of decadence nor from a metaphysical radicality born of the death of God and of all the consequences that must be taken from this death. Today's nihilism is one of transparency, and it is in some sense more radical, more crucial than in its prior and historical forms, because this transparency, this irresolution is indissolubly that of the system, and that of all the theory that still pretends to analyze it. (Page 159)

The main simulation I see here is that of communication itself, and as Baudrillard might say, the implosion of meaning!!

Amazon, please reclassify under fiction.

Guillaume
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Read to enjoy, not to impress your friends, 23 Jun 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Simulacra and Simulation (The Body in Theory: Histories of Cultural Materialism) (Paperback)
To respond to the previous writer's criticism: The reason this book lacks a coherent, logical structure is that it is a collection of essays. Consequently, one should not be surprised that it is not nicely tied together by an introduction and conclusion.
I seldom agree with Baudrillard, not least because I am never too certain how seriously (given his anti-academic stance and avowed debt to pataphysics) he intends us to take him. However I always enjoy reading him because is such a consummate stylist. The essays in this book are more difficult than some of his work but, nonetheless, very enjoyable.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


26 of 33 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Provocative, 18 Aug 2003
This review is from: Simulacra and Simulation (The Body in Theory: Histories of Cultural Materialism) (Paperback)
Baudrillard is indeed modern philosophy's equivalent of Nietzsche, but in this work at least does not live up to that great man. Be prepared for a struggle if you want to read this book; the writer's arguments are painstakingly condensed to the point that it is hard to tell whether he has really justified his observation with evidence.
While the chapters on Clones and Holograms are very interesting, inherently suited as the subjects are to the books concern, in other places the subject matter and arguments do seem the result of whim rather than an attempt to locate truth.
So while this book contains a lot of value, and will certainly change the way the reader interprets the world, Baudrillards style of writing forces the intelligent reader to approach his claims critically and selectively.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Three stars for reality, 9 Mar 2012
This review is from: Simulacra and Simulation (The Body in Theory: Histories of Cultural Materialism) (Paperback)
Out in the world I noticed that the resolution seemed to be much higher than 1080p and that I could actually walk around. My studio monitors are pretty good but even though the sounds out there in the streets were discordant and scattered scraps, their fidelity still managed to impress. Rather than emerging from two speakers sound travelled towards me from all over the place. Each leaf on each tree that I passed seemed to have its own speaker and each spot up to the horizon also seemed to have its own speaker system, creating a remarkable feeling of immersion. I could also feel the wind on my face and I think that this had something to do with the sense of touch that I had heard about. I wasn't as impressed by this feature and considered asking for my money back but I hadn't paid any and besides I wasn't sure which company was providing this sensation. In terms of audio visual quality the world out there superseded even the most expensive high definition equipment. The software didn't seem to be much good though and I'm not even sure if there was any running. The programme seemed to involve people walking around and lots of cars driving about. It was a bit like GTA4 but without any explosions, gunfire or action of any sort. If the programmers rustle something up I might try 'the world out there' again. I'm sure that they will ask for a fee once reality has a killer app but hopefully there will be an option to pay as you go. I also sensed a rasping emptiness threatening to draw us all down into its acidic embrace but the manual didn't make mention of this so maybe I had received a defective batch of reality. I have half a mind to contact trading standards about this fault because it was mildly terrifying. I noticed that Amazon have a good deal on mass psychosis at the moment and so I would suggest giving delusions of grandeur a whirl instead because the 'world out there' is having a few teething troubles.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Difficult as a whole, but interesting in parts, 8 Jun 2011
This review is from: Simulacra and Simulation (The Body in Theory: Histories of Cultural Materialism) (Paperback)
I bought 'Simulacra and Simulation' second hand after hearing that 'The Matrix' was allegedly based on it (and also cameos in the film for a split second). The book itself is condensed into commentaries on particular topics coupled with critiques from the author and aligning things with a post-modernist viewpoint i.e. the concept of hyperreality in today's world, the use of language.

I thought that in small bite-size readings it does pay off, to an extent though. Like with many of the reviews, especially Markgoats' review, I agree that it is indeed annoyingly difficult where you may feel whether it was worth opening it in the first place or whether you are attempting to get up on your post-modern high horse. It tests the reader in ways that it is difficult to determine what Baudrillard wants us to think (or not think given the paradoxical nature of post-modernism). That said, the obscuring of points and drawn out sentences become second nature and you question whether or not you understand the book at all. Indeed a thesaurus and patience are required to tackle this, and adverse reactions of confusion may follow, but once deciphered like I said it pays off but in select areas. For instance the first chapter is enjoyable and pretty much details what a simulacra is, and it is interesting to delve into the essence of simulated realities without having to believe in them. On the other hand, the last chapter 'On Nihilism' to me dragged and I didn't feel as if I was learning anything about Baudrillard's philosophy.

Thought-provoking sometimes, but difficult and tedious at others
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice!, 12 Dec 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Simulacra and Simulation (The Body in Theory: Histories of Cultural Materialism) (Paperback)
A very interesting collection of observations about life. The subject of simulation is tackled using a wide variety of examples and case studies. Not always the easiest book to read, but well worth the effort.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sublime prose from one of history's greatest minds, 16 Oct 2012
This review is from: Simulacra and Simulation (The Body in Theory: Histories of Cultural Materialism) (Paperback)
Some favourite quotations:

"It is no longer a question of imitation, nor duplication, nor even parody. It is a question of substituting the signs of the real for the real, that is to say of an operation of deterring every real process via its operating double." (p.2)

(on god) "This is precisely what was feared by Iconoclasts, who millennial quarrel is still with us today . This is precisely because they predicted this omnipotence of simulacra, the faculty simulacra have of effacing God from conscience of man , and the destructive annihilating truth that they allow to appear - that deep down God never existed, that only simulacrum ever existed, even God himself was never anything but his own simulacrum - from this came their urge to destroy the images." (p.4)

"We are fascinated by Ramses as Renaissance Christians were by the American Indians, those (human?) beings who had never know the word of Christ. Thus at the beginning of colonization , there was a moment of stupor and bewilderment before the very possibility of escaping the universal law of the Gospel. There were two possible responses: either admit that this Law was not universal, or exterminate the Indians to efface the evidence. In general, one contented oneself with converting them , or even simply discovering them, which would suffice to slowly exterminate them." (p.10)

"Parody renders submission and transgression equivalent, and that is the most serious crime, because it cancels out the difference upon which the law is based," (p.21)

"History is our lost referential, that is to say our myth," (p.43)

"Neofiguration is an invocation of resemblance, but at the same time the flagrant proof of the disappearance of objects in their very representation: hyperreal." (p.45)

"Today, it is the real that has become the alibi of the model, in a world controlled by the principle of simulation. And paradoxically, it is the real that has become our true utopia - but a utopia that is no longer in the realm of the possible, that can only be dreampt of as one would dream of a lost object." (p.123)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Nice ideas, far too wordy, 26 Mar 2009
By 
Scott Rennie (Kilmarnock, Scotland) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Simulacra and Simulation (The Body in Theory: Histories of Cultural Materialism) (Paperback)
On reading this book it often feels like Baudrillard was given a list of long words and challenged to get as many of them into each sentence as he could. Now I like words, and am fond of many of the longer ones, but I get the feeling he impresses himself by stringing so many of them together when less would do just as well. And a few of his ideas have proven wrong through time - sure, I say that with the benefit of hindsight, but if you are going to put yourself on the line and then you turn out to be wrong, can you really claim to have such great insight into the way things "are"?

Overall pretty disappointing, some good ideas but given the choice again I'd not bother.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


25 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars beautiful nihilism, 15 Mar 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Simulacra and Simulation (The Body in Theory: Histories of Cultural Materialism) (Paperback)
'Nice' is hardly the word to describe 'The Precession of Simulacra'. Baudrillard, who to my mind is the best contemporary philosopher (along with Deleuze), is also the most entertaining. His perception is incredible, his writing beautiful - and most importantly, his nihilism is profound yet optimistic, in a Nietzschean kind of way. If you haven't read this, you just don't know what's going on.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No Baudrillard, No Matrix, 14 Mar 2009
By 
O. Neale (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Simulacra and Simulation (The Body in Theory: Histories of Cultural Materialism) (Paperback)
This book is directly referenced in the first Matrix film. That alone should warrant its place as a classic. However, its influence on philosophy and academia is vast and wide as well. It's the book that nobody gets but everyone takes little quotes out of to suit their own agenda. In a way, that might have been exactly what Baudrillard wanted. For my English degree I quoted the first page of the book without bothering to read the rest. But I later read the rest and found it strangely poetic. Postmodernism is the philosophy of the alienated. We all get alienated by our media saturated environment occasionally. This is one of the books that tries to explain why.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Simulacra and Simulation (The Body in Theory: Histories of Cultural Materialism)
11.91
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews