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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Some good advice
This contained some quite good and useful advice. I did learn a few things from it.

They layout is a bit of a mess and considering the cost it does have a bit of a cheap feel to it. This hasn't affected the rating that I have given the book but it is somewhat irritating and sadly all too common from this publisher.

It is a quick and easy read and I...
Published 20 months ago by The Emperor

versus
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great - if you can afford an external consultant!
Anyone who has any interest in Management books has read or heard of Patrick Lencioni. He writes in a style that is very accessible with lots of anecdotes and stories to help make the point.

This book is no different and is very readable.

As he will state himself, most of it is actually just uncommon common sense.

There was definitely a...
Published 19 months ago by Peter Roxburgh


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Some good advice, 26 Oct 2012
By 
The Emperor (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business (J-B Lencioni Series) (Hardcover)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This contained some quite good and useful advice. I did learn a few things from it.

They layout is a bit of a mess and considering the cost it does have a bit of a cheap feel to it. This hasn't affected the rating that I have given the book but it is somewhat irritating and sadly all too common from this publisher.

It is a quick and easy read and I thought that it was a lot better than most business books. It does make changing behaviour seem a lot easier than it is and it was a little light on specifics.

I do feel that `culture' is often exaggerated and that it is more of a symptom rather than a cause of success.

However despite these criticisms I did feel that I have gained some knowledge from reading this book.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great - if you can afford an external consultant!, 12 Dec 2012
By 
Peter Roxburgh (Dorset, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business (J-B Lencioni Series) (Hardcover)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Anyone who has any interest in Management books has read or heard of Patrick Lencioni. He writes in a style that is very accessible with lots of anecdotes and stories to help make the point.

This book is no different and is very readable.

As he will state himself, most of it is actually just uncommon common sense.

There was definitely a lot to take out of it given I have just recently joined a growing charity in a Senior Management position. The only problem however, is that much of what he prescribes requires an outside person to really do. For example, he talks about being Vulnerable and suggest that senior managers sit round and talk about one anothers childhood as a starting point.

I am not sure how well a suggestion like that would go down in my organisation, which is a charity and where we actually know each other quite well, let alone in an organisation where you have only ever been work-colleagues and it's a more 'aggressive' culture.

But if you are in senior management then you will definitely get some good ideas - some of which you may well be able to implement without outside intervention. Whatever it is, this will make you think or re-think the accepted norms of management. And that can only be a good thing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Concepts and Some Good Ideas, 30 Dec 2012
By 
Alison "runninggirlcycling" (Derbyshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business (J-B Lencioni Series) (Hardcover)
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The Advantage is focused on large organisations with management consultants working with CEOs and their management groups. There are some good ideas that can be transferred to different sorts of management and leadership groups, but all the examples are with high level leaders. Vague examples of activities are provided, but the message really is to get a consultant (such as one of Patrick Lencioni's company or similar) to actually be able to carry out the activities and make specific changes. There is not enough practical guidance in the book for it to be a manual to help towards gaining "The Advantage" in an organisation. I have enjoyed reading it and got some fresh perspective on organisational health, but the practical side of the book is lacking. Lencioni makes it sounds very easy to make changes but is too light on the specifics of what to do to make those changes in a defined way.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Every Board member should read this book, 31 Aug 2012
By 
R. Oppenheimer "Melville" (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business (J-B Lencioni Series) (Hardcover)
Clearly, there are some business leaders who are more progressive than others. In my company we have some modern people who understand the value of teamwork, integrated strategy and communication. We also have dinosaurs who think anything that does not involve deal-making is just HR rubbish. This book is going to be massively helpful to both. For sceptics, it will be refreshing because it studiously avoids the touchy-feely stuff. And for those who understand the benefits of organisational health, this book will still be full of useful tips.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars About setting mission statements and core values, 12 Jan 2013
By 
Rosey Lea (london, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business (J-B Lencioni Series) (Hardcover)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This isn't the book I thought it was going to be. It's not about "organizational health" as the title says, it's about the operational health of the most senior tier management team and the actions of the CEO towards that team, with the successful key to both (according to the book) being a clear company mission statement and stated core values.

So the book is pretty much 100% about setting that mission statement and core values.

Yes, some of the observations are useful - such as how can you have friendliness in your values if the management team all routinely stab each other in the back? But it would be an extremely brave (foolish?) person that would stand-up and ask for a mission statement to be revised in light of that. The advice that all the management team should open their vulnerability to each other by discussing their childhoods is utterly bonkers for the UK public and third sector markets I work in.

I'll admit I was horrified when the author actually recommended firing high performing staff that aren't a good `cultural fit' to the values (page 170). Suggesting that the empire would fall if a single person didn't identically meet the cultural criteria. In the real world, having created your mission statement and values from this book, you'd now be firing your legal team and ICT team for starters, preferring someone who can really pitch that baseball...as opposed to having a degree in contract law.

(I'm not familiar with the author, but the book jacket blurb states he "specializes in Executive Team Development". So I'm guessing all this stuff about childhood and honesty is what he'd deliver in a closed 3-day team building session, and hasn't considered how it would fail to work as a 10 minute AOB agenda item for people already working 70 hour weeks. This would also explain why the book is so short - 200 pages of double line spacing, large font and wide spacing.)
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The power of redundant "overcommunication" of what is most important to achieve and sustain organizational health, 12 April 2012
By 
Robert Morris (Dallas, Texas) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business (J-B Lencioni Series) (Hardcover)
After eight bestselling business fables, Patrick Lencioni has written a book in which he gathers his most important insights from them in a single volume. However, as he explains in the Introduction, "The book is the result of an unpredictable journey, one that began when I was just a kid, probably eight or nine years old." (He was born in 1962.) It draws upon but almost expands upon those books and really should be judged on its own merits, not theirs. That said, I wish to add that this is not a "best of" book, per se. Those who read it need not have read any of its predecessors, although I hope they eventually do read a few.

First, Lencioni makes a case for organizational health, not because the value of organizational health is in doubt but, rather, because it is ignored. "This is a shame because organizational health is different." It seems reasonable to me that many (most?) executives take their company's health for granted just as they take their own health for granted, at least until....

Next, Lencioni introduces "The Four Disciplines Model" and devotes a separate chapter to each discipline. With appropriate modifications, this model can be of substantial value to leaders in any company, whatever its size and nature may be. "An organization does not become [and remain] healthy in a linear, tidy fashion. Like building a strong marriage or family, it's a messy process that involves doing things at once, and it must be maintained on an ongoing basis in order to be preserved. Still, that messy process can be broken down into four simple disciplines." They are best considered within the book's narrative, in context. Suffice to say now that both a company's health and an organization's health (be it a company, school, church, etc.) requires a team effort. Moreover, in addition to being competent in what they are expected to do, members of the team must also communicate, cooperate, and collaborate effectively with each other. Lencioni recommends four specific steps to build such a team

To achieve clarity (i.e. everyone involved "being on the same page"), Lencioni recommends that "six simple but critical questions" be asked and then answered. My own opinion is that these questions should be posed frequently. Why? The best answer to that is provided by this anecdote. Years ago, a colleague of Albert Einstein's at Princeton pointed out to him that he always asked the same questions on his final examination. "Yes, that`s quite true. Each year, the answers are different."

Question #3 is "What do we do?" and reminds me of another anecdote. When Home Depot held a meeting of its store managers many years ago, one of the company's co-founders (either Bernie Marcus or Arthur Blank) reminded them that when a customer came through the door, it was not to purchase a quarter-inch drill. Rather, to purchase a quarter-inch hole.

The section entitled "The Centrality of Great Meetings" provides an explanation of how to sustain the rigor of the four disciplines, hence the health of the given organization. My own opinion is that very few meetings are "great." Most accomplish little (if anything) while wasting precious time, energy, attention, and enthusiasm. They are usually detrimental to organizational health. However, Lencioni asserts - and I agree - that there are four different types (conducted on a regular basis) that can be "great" if leaders follow the guidelines he recommends. (Please check out the material in Pages 175-187.) Of course, if an organization's leaders are inept with regard to establishing and then following the four disciplines, meetings will accomplish nothing.

For whom will this book be most valuable? It will help leaders of an organization that either needs to "get in shape" or "get in better shape" to gain or increase its competitive advantage. The key considerations include teamwork and clarity. An effective leader is imperative. If everyone is in charge, no one is. Moreover, with regard to clarity, repetition is imperative. There must be constant reminders - perhaps in the form of affirmations - of the shared vision and of what is most important to achieving it. Lencioni calls it "overcommunication."

Patrick Lencioni brilliantly explains why organizational health trumps everything else in business and, in fact, in all other domains of human initiatives. I presume to add, so does terminal illness.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Truly superb, 16 Jun 2014
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This review is from: The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business (J-B Lencioni Series) (Hardcover)
This is a truly enlightening read. As Lencioni makes each point you just realise how true the point is from your own experience. The team I am in runs much better now we have implemented some of this advice. Excellent!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great principles, but rehashed!, 13 April 2014
By 
Dave Conroy "Condyk" (Birmingham, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business (J-B Lencioni Series) (Hardcover)
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If you've read the authors previous books then you pretty well know what's coming in this one. Even tho' this is less storified than previous offerings, the examples are similar/the same and so are the principles. Is that a criticism? I guess so, but then many6 won't have read his previous offerings and so, for the newbie, this book distills anything of use and lays it out much more clearly than any of his other works. In essence a healthy company communicates openly and undertakes its tasks, the 1001 things that have to be done to be successful, with a genuine, human sense of togetherness and openness. OK, this isn't rocket science, but it is a handbook for success. I really don't think you need an external consultant as one other reviewer suggested. What you need is a CEO/Director/whoever with integrity and a willingness to push beyond day to day norms and establish new ones with his/her team. Personally, I've read his other stuff so this was a useful refresher. For a new manager, or one stuck in a rut, then this is a great investment. But success is about discussion, sometimes heated, and action ... not just about reading!
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5.0 out of 5 stars clear, simple and insightful, 25 Feb 2014
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This is the first book I read of the author and definitely not the last. Extremely easy to read and structured in the approach. A pleasure I would recommend.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Easy reading but a bit light on substance for my taste, 13 Jan 2014
By 
Toast (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business (J-B Lencioni Series) (Hardcover)
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An enjoyable read, one that I found informative and entertaining. Personally I would have preferred more practical and directly applicable examples than a general and holistic view but never the less a book I would readily pass on to others to read.
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