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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is amazing!!!
Honestly this book has been sooo liberating for me.
No longer does post-modernity have to be considered an enemy of christianity (as it often has been seen by a church stuck in its modern ways). Rather, it is a culture with good points and bad points just like any other.
If you love Jesus, yet you sometimes find yourself identifying more with those around you...
Published on 30 Jun. 2005 by Paul Sheriffs

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars what kind of faith?
I've often been quoted as saying, Jesus never died for us to be nice!
And I believe this will all of my heart.

Christianity is woven with offence, invitation and complexity. We cannot hold to a 'gentle Jesus meek and mild', for the controversy, challenge and crucifixion of Christ is ever left with us in the footprints of history. We cannot engage with...
Published on 4 Mar. 2013 by J. DOUGLAS


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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is amazing!!!, 30 Jun. 2005
By 
Paul Sheriffs (Watford, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Honestly this book has been sooo liberating for me.
No longer does post-modernity have to be considered an enemy of christianity (as it often has been seen by a church stuck in its modern ways). Rather, it is a culture with good points and bad points just like any other.
If you love Jesus, yet you sometimes find yourself identifying more with those around you than with those in the church, then this book is for you.
Or if you are just intrigued by him or some ideas of christianity, yet don't like the idea of a controlling, irrelevant religion then this is for you too.
It is written as a narrative rather than a textbook, so is very easy to read. The downside of this (and, perhaps, of its American audience) is that it has moments of cheesiness that you will need to forgive. But look beyond this and you will find a tale that may resonate with something deep within you.
WARNING: This book is not for everyone. If, for example, you think that evolution and christianity are inherently opposed then you will probably not like it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Refreshing and challenging, 3 Dec. 2008
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This review is from: The Story We Find Ourselves in: Further Adventures of a New Kind of Christian: Book 2 (Jossey-Bass Leadership Network Series) (Paperback)
Described in the foreword as 'creative non-fiction', this is the fictional tale of a scientist and her unorthodox Jamaican pastor friend, Neo, as the latter seeks to explain the the story of our lives, the Bible, and our relationship to God.

As the story unravels, so 'Neo' unravels the story of Creation, Crisis, Conversation, Christ, Community (Church), and Consumation. It's all fascinating stuff, starting with emergence rather than strictly evolution, and how God has sought to love us and woo us, giving our lives purpose and meaning.

As an evangelical Christian, some of the 'theories' are challenging, whilst some are told in such a refreshing new way, that they give new colour to what God is saying.

Read it knowing that it doesn't present all the answers, rather seeks to raise questions and encourage to seach deeper.

The only downfall is that the story is slow at times, but it's worth persevering to the end.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth Reading, 6 April 2007
By 
H Crittenden "nell overland" (Kent, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
If you are struggling with the contradictions between traditional Christianity and living in the modern world this could be the book for you, whether you see yourself as a Christian, someone who is looking for faith or from a more anthropoligical persepective. The downside to the book is that in trying to weld the theology to a fictional storyline it can feel rather slow going at times.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars what kind of faith?, 4 Mar. 2013
By 
J. DOUGLAS "Johnny Douglas" (Nr London, England) - See all my reviews
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I've often been quoted as saying, Jesus never died for us to be nice!
And I believe this will all of my heart.

Christianity is woven with offence, invitation and complexity. We cannot hold to a 'gentle Jesus meek and mild', for the controversy, challenge and crucifixion of Christ is ever left with us in the footprints of history. We cannot engage with Jesus, with amiable indifference. Sadly Brian McLaren offers little tension, drama or turn, here and it's a story minus any true meaningful impact. Though part of a multi-book series, this second parts spends less time talking about cultural shifts, rather it seeks to unpack a resulting 'new' theology. Ironically I think there is more dogma than life offered here by McLaren, for as C.S. Lewis once said, "anchoring any faith in the findings of science is a mistake."

There are more than a few disturbing elements, such as the spiritual enemy described as a 'metaphor to put a personality on evil." Further mentions of the enemy are similarly vague, yet there is an enemy, and removing references doesn't do anyone any favours except, of course, the enemy! Perhaps there's more truth in the lines from the movie, The Usual Suspects:- "The greatest lie the devil ever perpetrated on humanity was to convince the world that he doesn't exist."

While you can agree with McLaren that the communication of the gospel is changing as society changes, there is much more that is disagreeable in this book. The extent to which he blurs, abolishes and repaints the gospel, more than knocks on the door of heresy.

Jesus did live, die and rise again, as some form of unitarian cosmopolitan love-act.
Though this seeks to be bold and controversial, all that remains is an erroneous ambivalence born out of angst with faithful orthodoxy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars thought provoking novel, 11 Mar. 2009
This review is from: The Story We Find Ourselves in: Further Adventures of a New Kind of Christian: Book 2 (Jossey-Bass Leadership Network Series) (Paperback)
If you like to be stretched and challenged, if you wonder if many of the frequently heard talks about Jesus in churches are off target - then this book and series together with 'The Secret Message of Jesus" by McLaren - are well worth a read.

Sometimes I get to talk in churches and with groups of teenagers. The concepts in here have added to my understanding and been found inspiring. They have certainly caused many to think again and be re-invigorated.

You may disagree with McLaren or some of his characters - but listen closely and think hard.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the story of creation, 17 Mar. 2009
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This review is from: The Story We Find Ourselves in: Further Adventures of a New Kind of Christian: Book 2 (Jossey-Bass Leadership Network Series) (Paperback)
I read the trilogy in order & couldn't put down the first. This one was similar- an interesting approach to looking at creation (without seeing scientists as people who are deliberately trying to 'fix' their findings to keep God out of the equation) and as part of the big Story. I also like the approach to suffering in this book- praying for release (knowing it is possible) while also accepting that mostly we do end up learning through suffering rather than healing...
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stories about the Story?, 23 May 2004
By 
Richard M. Seel (Norfolk UK) - See all my reviews
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Dan & Neo from ‘A New Kind of Christian’, together with a couple of new characters, explore and expound the story we find ourselves in—the great story of life, the universe & everything. According to Neo there are seven main episodes: Creation, Crisis (the fall, sin & disobedience), Calling (of Abraham & Jews), Conversation (with priests, prophets, poets & philosophers), Christ, Community (of the church) and Consummation.
The book tends towards a kind of universalism or justification by works in its final stages but has many striking insights and offers a way of inviting people to make sense of their own lives by seeing them as part of this greater story.
Like "A New Kind of Christian" it is easy to read and offers much food for thought. Some postmodernists, like Lyotard, would say that no metanarrative is possible any more but McLaren makes a good case for saying that this one is compelling enough for people to intuitively accept it.
Richard Seel.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A worthwhile effort, 29 Jun. 2012
This book is a really good idea. If you have something to say, tell it as a story. It's more interesting and it's more likely to make you think. Didn't somebody else use stories like this...

However, it doesn't get 5 stars in my view because the quality of the story telling doesn't match the laudable ambition. The characterisation is generally OK and the ending is a well-worked way of making a telling point, but the narrative drags in the first part of the book. The dialogue often feels artificial. The author is clearly most at home in the Neo:Dan conversations. In contrast, the "scientists" come across as caricatures that (eventually) cheerfully agree with the author's salvation narrative and his easy accommodation of evolutionary theory. Some heartfelt disagreement might have livened the exchanges.
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4.0 out of 5 stars New Kind of Christian Part 2, 26 Sept. 2012
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I loved the trilogy but liked this one the least - but at least the cause of my main irritation (how much Neo seemed to know/thought through ostensibly by himself)was removed in the final part. But what I really liked about this and the other two is how much it made me rethink my own views. In many ways I ended up with more questions and uncertainties and yet at the same time with more faith - a good trade off!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brian does it again!!, 25 Jun. 2014
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Once again Brian McLaren expresses what is being said and thought among searching people - people seeking a Truth to live by in a pot-modern world. Couldn't put it down. Beautifully imagined as to style and expressed more eloquently than I can what I believe about Life, the Universe and Everything.........
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