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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Closed Passages and Ancient Secrets
I've remarked elsewhere that Caitlin Kiernan has gone a long way to establishing herself as a bright light in the firmament of horror writers. Kiernan has four novels to her credit, the first of which has only appeared as a limited edition. Threshold, which is her second commercial novel (and the first involving Chance Matthews and Deacon Silvey), is one of those...
Published on 13 July 2004 by Marc Ruby™

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Was I reading the same book?
Sorry but I found this book a challenge to complete and I am not looking forward the Low Red Moon.
The use of adjectives were too much or maybe I am not poetic enough to appreciate them.
I didn't find myself drawn in, Barb Hendee's Dhampir series is far superior in character development and engaging with the reader to hunger for more.
At the end of this...
Published on 28 Jun 2008 by Mrs. J. L. Varney


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Closed Passages and Ancient Secrets, 13 July 2004
This review is from: Threshold (Paperback)
I've remarked elsewhere that Caitlin Kiernan has gone a long way to establishing herself as a bright light in the firmament of horror writers. Kiernan has four novels to her credit, the first of which has only appeared as a limited edition. Threshold, which is her second commercial novel (and the first involving Chance Matthews and Deacon Silvey), is one of those brilliant exercises that leaves the reader stunned and hungry for more.
This is Chance's novel, as Red Moon Rising is Deacon's. A run of deaths among Chance's friends and family have left her numb and at sea. In the middle of the sorrow two things happen to her In searching through her house, she discovers a box of her grandmother's research materials - paleontological artifacts, a diary, and a vial with the preserved body of a curious insect that bears an uncanny resemblance to a trilobyte. All are drawn from the same local mine. The second event is the appearance of Dancy Flammarion a monster hunter who knows more than she possibly could.
In between her explorations of the lives and relationships of Chance, her ex-boyfriend Deacon, his current lover Sadie Jasper, and Dancy, Kiernan lets us have glimpses of an ancient horror that has come to see them as a threat. It manifests in many forms - a fellow bus rider, the ghosts of friends, eerie animals that live in the darkest corners, and something thoughtlessly evil that lurks in the depths of the mines.
Once touch at a time the horror builds subtly for the most part, until the reader experiences a sense of free form unease. Kiernan works with small crises rather than apocalypses, but the potential is always just under the surface. And then the writer finds a finish that is both intrnsely satisfying and deeply mysterious.
This is a superbly crafted book. Kiernan's habit of choosing the lost and the hopeless as main characters will invite comparisons will Poppy Brite, but she is really a different sort of writer. And in my minds eye, possible the better of the two. She draws from sources as diverse as Lovecraft and Beowulf without a blink, and manages to keep the concoction marching to the satisfaction of the reader. Read it, and prepare for a nightmare or two.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars poetic horror, 19 Aug 2005
This review is from: Threshold (Paperback)
Wow! I had wanted to read a full novel by Caitlin for several years (having read her Vertigo work and the story in The Sandman Collection) and boy was it worth the wait. This shoots onto my all time favourite list. The quality of her writing, both lyrical and moving, is stunning. There were times reading this when I was gob smacked at her use of the english language. Gaiman's quote about her being 'the poet and bard of the waste and the lost' is spot on.
The story itself moves at a wonderful pace, the ending - if anything - came too quickly as I wanted more. More of Chance, Deke, Dancey and Sadie, fully realised character with quirks and differing traits. More of the creepy dog people and Beowulf monsters. I want to be immersed back into Kierman's deep Southern vision of horror. So much so that I have already order another of her books.
Read This Book. Say it with me, "Read this book"
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everyday Horrors, 13 July 2005
By 
Sandy Buchanan (Buxton, Derbyshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Threshold (Paperback)
If you begin to read the prologue of this book and it suddenly stops make sense, don't worry, keep reading: there is a reason for this confusion, and discovering it will be well worth your time. Time is very much out of joint in this story, and something very old is very keen that there should be no suriviving witnesses to its existence.
There are no world-threatening apocalypses in this book, but the charcters all have real enough personalities for you to genuinely care when they find themselves in danger. Although the prose does on occasions get a little purple- Kiernan has a nasty habit of creating ugly compound adjectives- the writing is generally rich and intense, with vivid, everyday world of geology labs, cheap appartments, back roads and laundrettes nicely setting off the chthonic nasties, all against an evocatively sticky Southern backdrop. In fact, the Lovecraftian horrors are all the more terrifying for frequenting municipal parks, greyhound buses and civic waterworks rather than mysterious ruins or sinister catacombs. Time warps, latter-day Grendels and alibino monster-slayers are much easy to take seriously against this background.
Despite my fears of crashingly dull info-dumps when I saw this book had a technical glossary, Caitlin Kiernan manages to interleave her knowledge of paleontology seamlessly into the book. My only complaint is that a lot of the exposition is blink-and-you-miss it: pass over the wrong line and the ending won't make sense. But in general, this is a superbly sinister book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Over rated, 16 Feb 2010
This review is from: Threshold (Mass Market Paperback)
With positive reviews from Neil Gaiman and Clive Barker on the cover I was very much looking forward to reading this book. However, I thought it was a load of Emo Tween nonsense that had zero tension, little originality, sorry make that no originality and which I abandoned about 3/4 of the way through because it was getting on my nerves. I joins a very short list just 2 or 3 of books that I have ever walked away from without finishing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Was I reading the same book?, 28 Jun 2008
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This review is from: Threshold (Mass Market Paperback)
Sorry but I found this book a challenge to complete and I am not looking forward the Low Red Moon.
The use of adjectives were too much or maybe I am not poetic enough to appreciate them.
I didn't find myself drawn in, Barb Hendee's Dhampir series is far superior in character development and engaging with the reader to hunger for more.
At the end of this book, wouldn't have minded if the characters had been killed off in one go.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A book that will divide the crowd, 7 Aug 2012
This review is from: Threshold (Mass Market Paperback)
Not book for everyone, in fact some will hate it but it was a hit for me: a fabulous piece of weird fiction that provokes and intrigues. Suspend the normal rules and imagine ancient things that go bump in the night! I think this is kiernan's best novel, though it was the glitteringly good short story "houses under the sea" that first turned me on to kiernan's work. This short story can be found in a mammoth book of horror sold on Amazon elsewhere.
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3 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A twisted, disturbing, wondeful follow-up to "Silk", 29 Dec 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Threshold (Paperback)
This is a great book. Just like her last novel "Silk" it's pretty weird and slightly confusing although I found it easier to follow; and it seems that her writing has improved.
The storyline is very original and very interesting (especially if you like geology!). The ending is completely unexpected. As I said it's a fab book that I could hardly put down - it took me three days to read.
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Threshold
Threshold by Caitlin R. Kiernan (Mass Market Paperback - 1 Jan 2007)
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