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93 of 98 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The One to Beat.
I know some people who hate the movie and will not touch this book. I know a few who own and love the movie but have never read the book. I have lent DUNE to friends who could get no further than page 20 because it was too "out there" or too difficult, with its array of characters and glossary of made-up terms. But of all the people who have gotten past page 20-...
Published on 8 Feb 2001 by Dan Dean

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83 of 91 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Review of Kindle version
I've read this book multiple times in the past and so won't comment on just how good the story is.

The low mark reflects problems with formatting on the Kindle version. Repeatedly, almost once per page, I find instances where quotation marks are missing. Speech starts from characters and I find myself not realising that the story has transitioned from...
Published on 10 Sep 2011 by Stephen McNamara


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93 of 98 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The One to Beat., 8 Feb 2001
By 
Dan Dean (Myrtle Beach, SC USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Dune (Paperback)
I know some people who hate the movie and will not touch this book. I know a few who own and love the movie but have never read the book. I have lent DUNE to friends who could get no further than page 20 because it was too "out there" or too difficult, with its array of characters and glossary of made-up terms. But of all the people who have gotten past page 20- I don't know one who doesn't praise it among their absolute favorites. I am no exception.
I love sci-fi but don't read much of it because I prefer fantasy. DUNE feels like a perfect blend of the two. A war of noble houses set in space. Paul Atreides is heir to the duchy- and to say that he is well trained for the job would be an understatement. His father, Duke Leto, is given charge of Arrakis- a hellish desert-world and the sole source of "the spice" which the entire universe needs. A very prestigious assignment, but treachery and peril comes with it. Paul finds himself thrown into the mystery of Dune and its fierce natives, the Fremen. Is he the savior their prophecy speaks of?
I was first blown away by DUNE at the age of 16, and have since considered it "the one to beat". In 8 years, very few books have made me question that judgment: Game of Thrones, Foundation, Lord of the Rings, Ender's Game. I had to reread it to be sure I wasn't just nave at the time. Was it really THAT great? Absolutely.
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83 of 91 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Review of Kindle version, 10 Sep 2011
This review is from: Dune (Kindle Edition)
I've read this book multiple times in the past and so won't comment on just how good the story is.

The low mark reflects problems with formatting on the Kindle version. Repeatedly, almost once per page, I find instances where quotation marks are missing. Speech starts from characters and I find myself not realising that the story has transitioned from description to speech, meaning I end up going back a sentence to get the full context.

Hopefully Amazon will get the publishers to update the Kindle version with corrected formatting.

In conclusion: great real book, not a great electronic book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most awe enspiring books of this time., 19 Jan 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Dune (Paperback)
Dune is the first in a series of 6 books. Dune is the story of the conflict between many great forces set in the far future where space travel is controled by a group of mutated humans called the spacing guild. The two main forces in the book are however house Atredies recently instaled as goveners of Arrakas, or Dune for short, a inhospitable wasteland that is the only place in the universe that the Spice Melange can be found. The spice is the fuel for space travel and also enables long life and phychic powers. House Harkonnan are the ones that have been removed from Dune but viciously want it back. They set a plan in motion that will see house Atredies destroyed, for now. Within the rocks of dune live a people know as the Fremen who have long wanted to have control of their world, when the young leader of house atredies flees into the desert they reluctantly acept him into their ranksnot aware that he is the producty of a millenium long breeding program to create a super human with the power to see all the posabiltys in the future. Little do the Fremen know that the actions that they will take will not only take back their world but will end with the overthrowing of a millenium old dynacy...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dune, 27 Mar 2013
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This review is from: Dune (Paperback)
I'm not going to lie, I found Dune hard going; at times it was the literary equivalent of wading through desert sand. That's not to say it is not an enjoyable and rewarding read, but rather that it does require an element of concentration and persistence on the behalf of the reader. It's a catch twenty-two though, because many of the elements that make it a more complicated read also add to the richness and texture of the book, its characters, and the setting. It is also these elements that draw you so completely into the alternate world of Arrakis that you begin to understand how this book is viewed as a classic of (not just sci-fi) literature.

Dune is built on a grandiose scale, one of interstellar travel, imperial emperors and apocalyptic reckoning. It is one of few books I know of that not only boasts a glossary of terms, but also essays on the ecology and religion of the subject [planet]. It also requires the digesting of a myriad of `made up' terminology, and the buying-into of some metaphysical shenanigans. In amongst all this there is always a danger that everything can become so detached from our reality that the story lacks a familiar grounding and is diluted by consequence. However, it is through the central characters, namely Paul Atreides and his mother Jessica, that the story is really held together as a tale of personal attrition, retribution, and discovery.

I cannot believe it has taken me so long to get around to reading this, I will certainly be reading Dune Messiah now.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The voice from the outer world..., 22 Dec 2002
By 
Mr. Dt Hawkins (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dune (Paperback)
Dune.
Even the name commands power, tells the reader that this is novel is something special...
The book details the story of one Paul Atreides, the son of a highly respected Duke in the far future society of the Landsraad and Padishar Empire, as he is caught betwixt the feud of his own noble house and that of their rivals, the Harkonnen. And yet, this is just the tip of iceberg as his family collapses around him, he comes to realise that the destiny he was bred for is much more sinister...
Words cannot do justice to the greatness of this book: there is just so much going on within its pages. The universe is just so elegantly realised, the story, just so epic in scope and the attention to detail of the ecology of the alien world, Arrakis...
What we end up with is a complex tale of politics, intrigue and warning: an over-reliance is the same as crippling oneself. From man's over-reliance of machinery to water and to the most important substance in the universe, the geriatric spice melange.
Dune is by far and away my favourite novel. The universe, the story, the ideas scattered throughout the prose...almost everything about it is just the pinnacle of literature. The only bad point is Frank Herbert's characterisation doesn't fully mature as a writer until the last two books in the sequence.
This book is sci-fi at its best but don't let the 'pigeon-hole' of sci-fi put you off: at the heart of this novel is an extraordinary tale which could take place in any environment.
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47 of 52 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic and timeless, 7 Feb 2006
By 
A. Morley (Ripley, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dune (Paperback)
Epic in scale. Epic in vision. Epic in ideas. Dune’s place as the greatest science fiction novel of all time can be attributed to these three phases. Whilst the other contenders that are frequently thrown around as the best ever (such as The Demolished Man, Ender’s Game, Foundation, 1984, The Forever War, etc.), Dune surpasses them in all aspects from writing style, story and, most overlooked in the genre, depth of character.
What really sets this apart from other books is its length. Whilst this has never ensured consistent quality (quite the opposite in many cases), Herbert has filled the 600-odd pages with superb prose that never wanders, never sags and always is delightful to read. The story is told from multiple points of view (often changes occur within a paragraph), so we learn effectively about the characters but we are never confused by this style. Every thought is recorded for our digestion which means the characters of Dune are wonderfully complex, each with their own nuances and failings. However I don’t imply that the book is full of dense, terse, symbolic writing that would make English graduates salivate. Rather the plot moves along with a large amount of dialogue and the subtle action sequences ensure even the most impatient reader is never bored.
The story revolves around Paul Atreides of the House Atreides. In a galaxy far away and far into the future, Dune features no aliens and few of the usual SF trappings. This is essentially a character-driven story so a hard SF fan may not enjoy it to the extent that I (and others) have. As we follow Paul and his family relocate themselves to the planet Arrakis/Dune as new rulers, much of the first act is concerned with the ducal court that surrounds Paul. At this point it could easily be classed as a fantasy novel because of the abundance of swords and of the royal hierarchy, ritual and betrayal. But it is definitely grounded in science fiction with its limited use of force fields, flying vehicles and highly-conditioned individuals that can perform extreme logical computations.
The most enjoyable part of the book for me was when the natives of Arrakis/Dune (the Fremen) ride the massive sand worms. Where Herbert got the idea for them I don’t know but they take the book to such a higher level that any comparison with Lawrence of Arabia seems redundant and misguided. One definitely thinks of T.E. Lawrence throughout the book with the galactic Emperor being the Ottoman Sultan, the spice melange being oil and the CHOAM corporation being OPEC etc. But after a while Paul’s ascent to greatness is unique and distinctive and is genuinely inventive.
I have not read the other 5 or so sequels, let alone the prequels written by Brian Herbert and have no intention to do so. For me, Dune is a standalone novel that needs no further explanation with other pieces of literature (save the fantastic glossary included, which clarifies everything you need to know). Very few books deserve a five star rating. This is one of them.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The One to Beat., 8 Feb 2001
By 
Dan Dean (Myrtle Beach, SC USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Dune (Hardcover)
I know some people who hate the movie and will not touch this book. I know a few who own and love the movie but have never read the book. I have lent DUNE to friends who could get no further than page 20 because it was too "out there" or too difficult, with its array of characters and glossary of made-up terms. But of all the people who have gotten past page 20- I don't know one who doesn't praise it among their absolute favorites. I am no exception.
I love sci-fi but don't read much of it because I prefer fantasy. DUNE feels like a perfect blend of the two. A war of noble houses set in space. Paul Atreides is heir to the duchy- and to say that he is well trained for the job would be an understatement. His father, Duke Leto, is given charge of Arrakis- a hellish desert-world and the sole source of "the spice" which the entire universe needs. A very prestigious assignment, but treachery and peril comes with it. Paul finds himself thrown into the mystery of Dune and its fierce natives, the Fremen. Is he the savior their prophecy speaks of?
I was first blown away by DUNE at the age of 16, and have since considered it "the one to beat". In 8 years, very few books have made me question that judgment: Game of Thrones, Foundation, Lord of the Rings, Ender's Game. I had to reread it to be sure I wasn't just nave at the time. Was it really THAT great? Absolutely.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic book, 11 May 2009
By 
Mr. Dsc Menzies "UK.BOY" (UK.BOY) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dune (Paperback)
Frank Herberts "Dune" is, for me, one of the most intelligently written pieces of literature I have ever read. I think the people that write negative reviews about this book have not concentrated fully whilst reading the text. He has an abstract way of describing events, which sometimes demands that one gives 100% concentration to what's being written. Otherwise, I can see how his work can be described as boring and long-winded. However, THIS IS NOT A DAN BROWN NOVEL. It is not an easy fix. My favourite thing about his writing is his ability to explain, clearly and easily, how people interact. How they feel, think and talk. He takes basic communication and makes it interesting, bringing you into the mind of the given character, and allowing you to love him, as if it was you speaking. The plot is at first a rather strange one. But upon reading a few of the squeals one sees the magnitude of the universe that frank has created. Honestly said, I was not blown away by the first book, but I was naive. I didn't give it the attention it deserved. Upon reading Dune Messiah I realised what I was in for in the forthcoming sequels. Now, I'm addicted. And there's no going back. Oh dear, what have I done?
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book; kindle edition a bit of a let-down, 24 Oct 2011
By 
S. D. Barnett-cormack "SamBC" (Lancaster, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dune (Kindle Edition)
This book is as wonderful as ever, and for the most part the kindle version is great. It has quite a lot of typos in, though, many of which read like OCR errors - Yueh written Yuen, for example, and quite a few instances of missing opening quote marks.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Prepare to lose your mind..., 15 Nov 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Dune (Paperback)
Just an astonishing work of Fiction, easily the finest series of books I have ever read, and all kicked-off by the cream of the crop, Dune!
Enough people have summarised the content and general themes and I have no argument with any of them. This book is a must read! That said..........
Beware of some of the content. I read the book at 27, and consider myself an intellectual chap, but some parts of the book were clearly intended for beings higher than myself.
Mr Herbert enjoyed confusing his audience from time to time. Some of his talk of genetics, especially given the current GM climate, is simply decades before its time, but some of his other passages, especially surrounding prescience, can be a bit esoteric to say the least.
Having said all that, just an immaculate book. I couldn't put it down (even when my head hurt!) and am now on book 5. For me, book 2 is more enjoyable, but far less startling and challenging than the original. I have never seen the film, and I'm in no hurry to do so. How could anyone ever do the book justice??
Prepare for the ride of your life (but take some Ibuprofen with you.. ;))
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Dune by Frank Herbert (Paperback - 1 Feb 1982)
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