Customer Reviews


32 Reviews
5 star:
 (16)
4 star:
 (12)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unnatural Death - Lord Peter asks not only `whodunnit', and `howdunnit', but was it even dun at all?
First published in 1927, this is the third of Drothy L Sayers' Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries. This review is for the 1975 full cast radio dramatisation starring Ian Carmichael as Lord Peter.

In this story a chance encounter with a Doctor sets Lord Peter off on a puzzling mystery. The Doctor lost his standing in his local community and subsequently had to leave...
Published 11 months ago by Victor

versus
11 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Classic detective fiction with the brilliant Peter Wimsey
While this isn't my favourite D.L Sayers, it's a wonderful story, about a young woman suspected of murdering her rich aunt and a servant who signed the aunt's will...but the post mortem doesn't show anything. Only Lord Peter Wimsey can solve the case, with the help of Chief Inspector Parker and Miss Climpson.
Published on 4 Oct 2000


Most Helpful First | Newest First

4.0 out of 5 stars Real detective work, 8 Jan 2014
By 
Shirley Wittering "Greensleeves" (Cambridgeshire, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
All fans of Lord Peter will enjoy this story, fast and interesting. I read it in one go. A real classic who-done-it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars more murders !!!, 14 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Wymsey at his immitable best. Sound quality excellent, BBC full cast dramatization is just simply the best . well worth the money
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Finally on Kindle, 7 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Have been waiting for my favourite books to be kindle ready for a long time. Well worth the wait. Excellent read as ever.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Dorothy L Sayers Mystery, 9 Sep 2013
By 
JMPBS (Lancashire) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have recently begun to re-read the Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries on Kindle. The impact has not diminished; Dorothy L Sayers continues to shine as the standard to which all mystery writers should aspire. Brilliant
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars DLS at her best, 14 Aug 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Excellent story you know who it is at the start but it is how and whether they get away with it thats the issue. Its very much of its time so some of the language reflect the attitudes of the early 20th century so be warned but otherwise a great read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Great story, 16 May 2013
By 
Mrs. I. E. Allen (Maldon, Essex, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I liked this story - so 'old world' but rather convoluted in parts.
Ian Carmichael is, as always, superb, and I enjoyed the twists in the story
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A good mystery story, 25 Mar 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A good and satisfying Sayers mystery, well written as always. I enjoy Miss Climpson's insights and exploits and was glad she featured in this story as well as Lord Peter
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Classic trip down memory lane, 21 May 2012
By 
Brian R. Martin (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Unnatural Death (A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery) (Paperback)
This a classic `British style' mystery featuring Dorothy Sayers' hero Lord Peter Wimsey, a well-educated rich toff, who, relieved of the necessity of working for a living, spends much of his time investigating interesting criminal cases with the assistance of his long-suffering friend, Inspector Parker of Scotland Yard. This one starts when the pair has a chance meeting in a restaurant with a young doctor. He tells them a story of how he was forced to give up his rural GP's practice because he insisted on investigating the death of an elderly female patient of his, who although terminally ill, was not expected to die so suddenly. Wimsey is intrigued by some details of the story, including the actions of the woman's niece, who inherits her aunt's money in the absence of a Will. Despite the absence of any direct evidence that the death was suspicious, Wimsey decides to investigate further. Having quickly established the bare facts of the circumstances, he quickly concludes that the elderly patient was indeed murdered and believes he knows who was the murderer. He sets out to prove his theories.

This is all too much for Parker, who repeatedly reminds Wimsey that the post mortem found no evidence of foul play. Undeterred, Wimsey presses on and installs another of his assistants, a Miss Marples-like spinster called Miss Climpson, in the village where events took place, to secretly gather information about the many characters involved. Eventually Parker is forced to take the possibility of murder seriously when a former maid at the house is killed and other suspicious evidence emerges involving a recent change in the law concerning intestacy, the circumstances why a Will had not been made, and the possible existence of other beneficiaries. A number of false trails are pursed, involving visits to various parts of Sothern England, and another murder occurs before the final mystery is solved and Wimsey's suspicions are vindicated.

Reading this book was an enjoyable trip down memory lane. There are many stock characters, such as Miss Climpson, the local parson, a dim-witted Chief Constable, and some of the rural inhabitants of the village, but they all seem to fit into the story rather well. Even their prejudices, including casual racism, although jarring to modern ears, seems natural for the times. The plot is sufficiently complicated to keep the reader's attention and the final solution, although largely predictable, has one feature that I had not anticipated until the last few pages. Overall, an enjoyable period piece and a good contrast to modern thrillers.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars An original murder mystery, 21 April 2011
By 
H. M. Holt "souloftherose" (Tring, Herts) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Unnatural Death (A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery) (Paperback)
The third book in Sayers' Lord Peter Wimsey series and my favourite so far (although admittedly I haven't got very far yet).

Lord Peter and Inspector Parker are having lunch one day when they strike up a conversation with a young doctor who mentions to them that he's convinced that a patient of his was murdered although he was able to find no evidence of foul play when he performed a post mortem. Lord Peter is convinced by the doctor's story and decides to investigate further.

I thought this was an unusual and original idea for a murder mystery in that from the very beginning we know 'who dunnit' but not why or how. And it's the why and the how (and some proof) that Lord Peter needs. The body count gets higher as the book progresses and I found myself completely gripped by the story and read the whole thing in one sitting.

We also get to see a more serious side to Lord Peter during a conversation he has with a minister about the morality of killing a terminally ill patient and the amount of responsibility Lord Peter should feel for investigating the crime and prompting further murders.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Mystery with style!, 14 Mar 2006
By 
Kurt Messick "FrKurt Messick" (London, SW1) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Dorothy Sayers, a.k.a. Dorothy Leigh Sayers Fleming, one of the first women to ever be granted a degree from Oxford University, created one of the leading figures in, and indeed in so doing helped to create the genre of, the British mystery novels. Lord Peter Wimsey, an elegant, refined London-based aristocrat with a taste for books and a penchant for the piano, is again here the leading figure, in Unnatural Death, also published as The Dawson Pedigree.
Wimsey is an old Etonian, Balliol Oxford (of course), served with distinction in His Majesty's forces during the War (this book having been written in 1927, I shall leave it to your good services to deduce which War), who resides both town and country somewhat fashionably, and takes great pride in the ancient family history (by the time one gets to be the fifteenth Duke of anything, the family can be easily considered ancient). Wimsey has a vocation as criminologist, not out of necessity, surely, and not by training either (for such training did not formally exist, but, as an Oxford Arts man, he was trained for most anything intellectual, or at least, that is what an Oxford Arts man would tell you). An interesting addition to the beginning of the book is a short biographical sketch of the fictional Wimsey by his equally-fictional uncle.
All of this, of course, is but preamble to the latest mystery to come calling upon Lord Wimsey. There are the requisite features: a dead woman, Agatha Dawson, wealthy and having left a will that might not be a will, but rather a sham (a delirious woman whose nurse insists that there was no possible way of having made a will during the last month, yet oddly there is a document, complete with a witness who claims that dear old Agatha Dawson wanted nothing to do with the signing -- ah, the plot thickens here).
Of course, to most of the world, Wimsey is, well, following a whimsey of his own. The woman was after all elderly and in poor health; surely his investigations are misplaced. The doctor (not the one who tended Miss Dawson's death, to be sure, but an earlier doctor, suspicious of Dawson's sole heir, her niece) was accused of having blackened the name of Miss Whittaker, the niece, unnecessarily, particularly as no evidence of mischief had been uncovered. Wimsey with the assistance of Inspector Parker are able to rectify the situation vis-a-vis the doctor, but there is still the mystery.
Then, more death. This time the maid. To lose one woman may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose two women... (well, you can fill in the rest yourself).
Of course I won't spoil it for you; perhaps my tag-team reviewers will do that for you, but I sincerely hope not. Suffice it to say, Wimsey proves himself a consummate actor in which the truth comes out (in London, and in style!).
One of the glories of Sayers work is the intricacies of her plots. She tends to get a huge number of people involved (the number of people who seemed to have trouped through the ill woman's bedchamber is in itself surprising, given the era) each with subplots and agenda that nonetheless get neatly resolved in the end. Sayers' development of character (even of the already dead ones!) is done with style and subtlety; while Wimsey is developed over several novels, one doesn't feel him a stranger by reading this one alone. The other characters fit their parts admirably (had Sayers not been a writer, she may well have made a good career as a casting director in Hollywood), in physical and personality attributes.
Her descriptions of the milieu, both in town (London) and in the country (the village and surroundings, in this case, of Hampshire, are interesting reading. Sayers is very much the cosmopolitan, and somewhat condescending toward the countryfolk. However, that is not a heavy element, and perhaps can be written off to her attempt to make Wimsey even more the worldly character he turns out to be over the course of her novels.
In all, an excellent read, a great diversion, and well worth musing over while sipping tea on a Regency-style sofa in one's dressing gown.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Unnatural Death (A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery)
Unnatural Death (A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery) by Dorothy L Sayers (Paperback - 1 Nov 1982)
7.19
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews