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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Did Somebody Say MacDonald?", 11 Mar. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Cinnamon Skin (Travis McGee Mysteries) (Mass Market Paperback)
John D. MacDonald's 20th Travis McGee book "Cinnamon Skin" reads as well today as it did when published in 1982. It is one of the very few books I have ever re-read and it was refreshing to find that it is just as exciting, just as relevant today as it was when I first read it. In "Cinnamon Skin," we find Meyer's newly-wed niece Norma and her husband being murdered aboard Meyer's boat "The John Maynard Keynes"--and, of course, the circumstances are suspicious. Was the explosion at sea revenge for a drug deal gone wrong? Did it have something to do with Meyer's own past (after all, he'd been in Chile a few years earlier)? Regardless, it is greatly disturbing to Meyer who enlists his friend Travis to help. Meyer's loss is Travis', after all, Travis is rough and tough but philosophic,and the ensuing McGee adventure takes the two on a convulted odyssey from Ft. Lauderdale to Texas to Mexico. MacDonald holds us spellbound with his plot revelations, but he is also a master at capturing the local color (especially noteworthy here is his interesting "history" of Cancun), and of sparking his suspense with daubs of humor. MacDonald's works frequently touch on socially significant issues, such as the environment, and especially on the damages that developers have been plying on the Florida coast, from shabby construction to irresponsible waste disposal. He likes to remind us that we are, after all, in the 20th century. "Soon the bosses of the microcomputer revolution will sell us preprogrammed units for each household which (will provide for everything). It will be the biggest revolution of all, bigger than the wheel, bigger than Franklin's kite, bigger than paper towels." In his many books, sometimes MacDonald seems to assume the role of Cassandra outside the gates of Thebes, crying out his revelations and prophesies, yet he is doomed not to be believed. Tis a pity. "Cinnamon Skin" carries, brilliantly, the MacDonald/McGee mystique, and while the series is over thirty years old, the colors in the titles have not faded; Travis is as relevant today as he has always been. MacDonald's prose--if nothing else-- will transport the reader on a magical, mystical, enthusiastic ride, well worth the fare. Take a trip to Lauderdale--it'll be a treat.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a good mystery, 5 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Cinnamon Skin (Travis McGee Mysteries) (Mass Market Paperback)
I really enjoyed the book. The most interstering parts were when Travis was thinking about why he didn't want to leave Florida.He was thinking about the dolphins and the birds that he would miss. It felt like I wouldn't want to leave either. Another part I like was when travis and Meyers were walking through the shopping mall and the difference between the neardie teens and the teen who were playing the average vidio games. I almost cried. I was thinking about the teens from Colobine High School from Colorado. If those kids have hung in there they would have been the new elete. and the jokes would have been middle magement if that. I loved the part about how Travis was talking to the lady from a small town in Texas to find killer. I am from Texas and that how talk. It was really funny
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5.0 out of 5 stars Free-standing, but a sequel to FREE FALL IN CRIMSON, 14 July 2005
By 
Michele L. Worley (Kingdom of the Mouse, United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cinnamon Skin (Travis McGee Mysteries) (Mass Market Paperback)
"My God, McGee, can't you come up with something more original?"
"I thought it was."
"It's a song, you idiot. Piel Canela: Cinnamon Skin. They sing it all over Mexico."
- sometimes a compliment just doesn't work
CINNAMON SKIN begins on an ominous note; McGee's gentle, scholarly friend Meyer, a year after the events of FREE FALL IN CRIMSON, is still suffering from having broken in the face of some very heavy threats by a particularly murderous psychopath. (As CINNAMON SKIN is self-contained - McGee summarizes Meyer's situation for his current, unusually long-running girlfriend Annie Renzetti at the start of the book - it isn't necessary to read CRIMSON first, although since it introduced Annie as well as Meyer's problem I'd recommend having it handy at least to read afterward.)
However, just as the reader may begin to suspect that this book will follow a predicable formula - Meyer helps McGee with a salvage operation, regains his self-respect - two separate plans to try to help Meyer out yield unexpected results. An old friend and colleague has arranged for Meyer to give a talk in Canada, while Meyer's only living relative, his niece Norma, arranged to visit with her new husband Evan Lawrence, and thanks to crossed wires Meyer's out of town for part of Norma's visit while she and Evan stay aboard his houseboat, the JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES.
Consequently, when Meyer's boat is bombed and lost with all aboard while on a fishing jaunt, Meyer himself isn't there. He's lost the last of his family, his home, and nearly everything he owns thanks to a self-proclaimed terrorist attack - but *that* snaps him out of his frozen depression. He's determined to see Norma avenged, and McGee (of course) is in on this from the start.
But the facts don't add up. The supposed Chilean outfit that claimed responsibility doesn't seem to exist, and nobody else involved in Meyer's only Chilean-related project has ever been threatened. Who was the intended victim? Hacksaw Jenkins, a straight-arrow charterboat row captain known to stay away from drug action? Norma, a rising young field geologist for a Texas oil company? Evan, a footloose good ol' boy?
The scene quickly moves from Florida to Texas as Meyer and McGee begin digging into the recent past of Norma and Evan. The necessary formalities of settling Norma's estate quickly set them on the beginning of a very long trail, where the missing pieces are the most significant of all: missing people, and missing money. The most notable settings in the book are Texas in high summer (various places, Meyer and McGee do a lot of driving without many fast-talking scams) and Cancun (which was a very new development at the time of the action of the book).
Several nice touches, a few of which I'll mention. McGee's relationship with Annie, the very successful manager of a hotel in Naples, has issues other than his long field trips for his job: *her* job involves working for a large company, with up-and-out promotion prospects. Various discourses all over the map, from a brief chat with a farm equipment supplier on the smartest farmer in his county (who works his land with mules) to time-shares in Cancun to various grieving relatives of several people who surely would hate for the state to take several years to try this case and then call it second-degree.
I rather enjoy Michael Pritchard as a reader for unabridged McGee stories, but tastes may vary.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Meyer Takes The Lead, 2 Jan. 2004
By 
Peter Kenney (Birmingham, Alabama, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Cinnamon Skin (Travis McGee Mysteries) (Mass Market Paperback)
In the last few Travis McGee novels, MacDonald focuses more than before on McGee's close friend Meyer. CINNAMON SKIN is a story in which Meyer takes the lead. He has to fight the demons of his past cowardice and also avenge the death of his niece. CINNAMON SKIN is one of the very best entries in the Travis McGee series.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A classic mystery novel, one of MacDonald's fine early works, 28 Jun. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Cinnamon Skin (Travis McGee Mysteries) (Mass Market Paperback)
I like the solid character development and enjoy the clever ways MacDonald finds to draw McGee into events that, at first, seem to have little to do with him.
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5.0 out of 5 stars If you've never read any of John D. MacDonald's ..., 11 Oct. 2014
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If you've never read any of John D. MacDonald's books, you're missing out.
Get out there and buy one !
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5.0 out of 5 stars Cinnamon Skin, 1 Jun. 2009
By 
Mr. N. D. Broadbent (england) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Cinnamon Skin (Travis McGee Mysteries) (Mass Market Paperback)
Cinnamon Skin - Travis Mcgee story, 1 of the Travis Mcgee stories - great read as ever
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Cinnamon Skin (Travis McGee Mysteries)
Cinnamon Skin (Travis McGee Mysteries) by John D. MacDonald (Mass Market Paperback - 1 April 1996)
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